How important are the USMLE scores if you decide not to do residency in the states?

Steiner83

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Thought of doing my internship, PhD and residency outside of the states but in order to get a working permit the USMLE:s are required.
How important is it though to have high scores on theese tests in order to get a decent job?
 

doc05

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remember you can't practice in the US without doing a residency here. why would you do something like this?? and where are you looking for residency??
 
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Steiner83

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Hmm. Talked to someone who apperently did not have to do any residency (or what we call speciliazation) as she already was certified as a cardiologist + had a PhD in cardiology working withing the EU.
Have the rules changed or do they differ from state to state?
 

doc05

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Steiner83 said:
Hmm. Talked to someone who apperently did not have to do any residency (or what we call speciliazation) as she already was certified as a cardiologist + had a PhD in cardiology working withing the EU.
Have the rules changed or do they differ from state to state?
methinks the rules have changed. if you plan on practicing in the US, you'd be a fool to train elsewhere.
 
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Steiner83

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I am just looking at my options. Spoke to someone else today who told me that specialized doctors have to do USMLE part 3 apart from 1+2.
In what sense would it be silly to practise in the US without doing the residency there?
 

camry

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Hello,
Even if you are a practicing attending in a foreign country and decide to then practice in the U.S., you will have to redo your residency (not sure about internship). If you are a U.S. medical graduate and plan on practicing here in the long run, I think you'd would be hard-pressed to validate a decision to go elsewhere for your training since you'd have to repeat it upon returning to the U.S.
 
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Steiner83

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But from what I have heard (several sources by now) is that once you are specialized you DO NOT have to re-do your residency. If that was the case certainly I wouldn´t consider to spend 5 years within the EU just to re-do it trying to get a position in the states....

Please, if anyone could find any OFFICIAL PRINTED information to put in the thread I´d be more than grateful.
 
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Blade28

Even if you're a practicing cardiologist (for example) in another country, if you want to practice ANY kind of medicine here in the US, you have to repeat residency. That means being certified by the ECFMG...so you need Step 1, Step 2, Step 3, etc. You'd have to go through some kind of Match (or acquire an out-of-Match contract).

Bottom line, if you want to practice in this country, you need to go through this country's training program. Sorry.
 

doc05

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Steiner83 said:
I am just looking at my options. Spoke to someone else today who told me that specialized doctors have to do USMLE part 3 apart from 1+2.
In what sense would it be silly to practise in the US without doing the residency there?
I see you are grossly misinformed. First, EVERY physician must take step 3...in order to get a license. Next, yes, there have been exceptions, but they don't happen anymore. And these exceptions have been for foreign attendings/professors taking academic positions (as someone else had mentioned). I have worked with a few residents and attendings who re-did their entire residencies upon moving to the US. Unless you plan on permanently relocating to the EU, don't train there.
 

InductionAgent

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Steiner83 said:
Thought of doing my internship, PhD and residency outside of the states but in order to get a working permit the USMLE:s are required.
How important is it though to have high scores on theese tests in order to get a decent job?
If you're that lazy/cheap/insecure in your ability to pass the USMLE steps, it's kind of scary that you might be practicing medicine anywhere.

Granted, they're not the most fun in the world, but neither are a lot of the difficult aspects of becoming a physician that set us apart as qualified practitioners.
 
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Steiner83

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Hmm, hard words from a lot of people. I am just asking some simple questions not trying to say that the system in USA is stupid or whatever. Please show some level of being mature.

Regarding the USMLE scores...I am thinking of doing the tests this summer, however I will work at the cardiology clinic at the same time and there might not be as much time to study - pararell to school and work, hence my question if it is worth to try taking the test at all.

So to conclude the thread.


To write and pass the USMLEs (1-3) is a requirement for any person wanting to practise as a doctor. To practise medicine in the US one has to get a residency no matter what.
Being a certified cardiologist in UK for 10 years for example, does not naturally mean that the person can work in the US with the same position although he/she has passed the USMLEs in the past.

Am I getting this correct?
 
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Blade28

Yes, you are correct. To practice in the US as a medical doctor (MD), you must take and pass all three Steps of the USMLE. You must also complete a residency here in this country. There may be exceptions, but as mentioned earlier, these are VERY rare.
 
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Steiner83

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So for cardiology, as an example. One would first need 3 years of "Internal medicine residency", then an additional 2-3 years of "Cardiology Residency" no matter how much previous experience, numbers of certifiactes, published articles, etc etc a foreign MD has?

Sorry for keeping asking "silly questions" as I have uttered before I am just trying to plan ahead....
 
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Blade28

Yes. To be a practicing cardiologist in this country, you need to go through an Internal Medicine residency (which requires passing USMLE Steps 1, 2, 3), then a Cardiology fellowship.

Come on, everyone's telling you the same thing here:

doc05 said:
remember you can't practice in the US without doing a residency here.
camry said:
Even if you are a practicing attending in a foreign country and decide to then practice in the U.S., you will have to redo your residency (not sure about internship).
flindophile said:
While undergraduate medical education is transferable between countries, postgraduate training is not. It makes absolutely no sense to train outside the US if you plan on working in the US -- unless you want to repeat your postgraduate training.
doc05 said:
First, EVERY physician must take step 3...in order to get a license...Unless you plan on permanently relocating to the EU, don't train there.
 
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Steiner83

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Ok, ok, GOT IT!