Loopo Henle

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I am a MIII at a very small southeastern medical school with essentially no reputation or research. I am looking to apply to pretty top shelf residencies for internal medicine next year (MGH, BWH, Brown, Hop, Duke etc...). I have the grades and scores 260+ on step 1. Junior year AOA etc... I was wondering how much these residencies look at where you went for medical school. Is it going to be detrimental, or do they not care? Also any opinions on what else I can do to make myself more attractive during my fourth year?
Thanks :D
 

med1234

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a top student at any school will always have a shot,
but if you're a so-so student at a top school, the school's name can help a lot. going to a top school also help in a lot of other ways - getting the chance to work with top researchers and having recs from known people. Most places i think try to have people who interview you in the field you're interested in. I've been surprised by how many of my interviewers know my PI, or at least have heard of him on paper. Plus, if you do well at your school and it has a good rep, the programs have a better idea of what they're getting. Long story short, it matters, and can actually matter a lot. however, it doesn't mean that you don't have a shot, especially with your stats. I know if you went to my school, you'd probably be one of the top guys going to a derm or rad onc type program without any problems and IM would be a walk in the park.
 

the citizen

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Do an away month at one or more of the places you mentioned. That way they will see you are not only good on paper.
 

Pili

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med1234 said:
a top student at any school will always have a shot,
but if you're a so-so student at a top school, the school's name can help a lot. going to a top school also help in a lot of other ways - getting the chance to work with top researchers and having recs from known people. Most places i think try to have people who interview you in the field you're interested in. I've been surprised by how many of my interviewers know my PI, or at least have heard of him on paper. Plus, if you do well at your school and it has a good rep, the programs have a better idea of what they're getting. Long story short, it matters, and can actually matter a lot. however, it doesn't mean that you don't have a shot, especially with your stats. I know if you went to my school, you'd probably be one of the top guys going to a derm or rad onc type program without any problems and IM would be a walk in the park.
I think some places, such as UCSF, are notorious for offering interviews mainly to big name schools. Somebody name a student they know from a lesser school getting an interview at UCSF.
 

Jamezuva

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Pili said:
I think some places, such as UCSF, are notorious for offering interviews mainly to big name schools. Somebody name a student they know from a lesser school getting an interview at UCSF.
I actually know of one....however, she's also from a relatively famous medical family... ;)
 

med1234

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the citizen said:
Do an away month at one or more of the places you mentioned. That way they will see you are not only good on paper.
agreed... however, the risk is that you have to stand out which might be tough if you're in a new system and new environment being compred to people who have done all their rotations there. Our school actually suggests against doing away rotations unless applying to a field where's it's absolutely necessary, because it can do more harm than good if you've got a school name to back you up. Even without a big name school though, i think it's still a risk. Your attending, etc.. can be completely random. They can be really nice or not, or somewhere in between. some hospitals may even invite you for an interview, but not have you meet with someone when you're there because they feel that they know you from your rotation there. That's a lot of pressure, and you look pretty strong on paper. Doing an away rotation is a toss up i'd say.
 

souljah1

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Jamezuva said:
I actually know of one....however, she's also from a relatively famous medical family... ;)

One of my interns on medicine here at UCSF graduated from Drexel Med and he was sharp as hell on the wards.
 

med1234

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souljah1 said:
One of my interns on medicine here at UCSF graduated from Drexel Med and he was sharp as hell on the wards.
I remember seeing people from schools i didn't really recognize at SF, but there and elsewhere, it was definitely a minority, like 1 for every person from a top 20 school. I actually said something about that when i was at columbia and my interviewer said something about how there are so many applicants and with all things being equal, you know that with a big name school, someone else has presumably done the screening for you.

i also have to say that research makes a difference at most top places - these are really research institutions and that's how they make their name and money - it's probably why mdphds walk right through even though their main focus may not always be on taking care of patients. That doesn't mean that top places aren't interested in sending clinicians into the community. Someone with top notch reasearch from a lesser known place can stand out that way too.
 

buz

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med1234 said:
I remember seeing people from schools i didn't really recognize at SF, but there and elsewhere, it was definitely a minority, like 1 for every person from a top 20 school. I actually said something about that when i was at columbia and my interviewer said something about how there are so many applicants and with all things being equal, you know that with a big name school, someone else has presumably done the screening for you.

i also have to say that research makes a difference at most top places - these are really research institutions and that's how they make their name and money - it's probably why mdphds walk right through even though their main focus may not always be on taking care of patients. That doesn't mean that top places aren't interested in sending clinicians into the community. Someone with top notch reasearch from a lesser known place can stand out that way too.
The best answer to your question will come in one month, after Match Day.
 

med1234

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actually, there's probably no need to wait until match day. just look at prior match lists from your school. I'm sure in any given year, there have been solid performers from your school. See if there are people going to top programs in previous years. If so, you're probably ok. if not, you may have to do something extra.