Syncrohnize

PGY-1
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Dec 28, 2010
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As a 3rd year, with the risk of tooting my own horn, I feel way more mature than I was in college with better self awareness/control and just a better understanding of how the real world works. That being said, I still occasionally slip up on the execution of my actions so I'm nowhere near perfect.

Interestingly, academically I feel I haven't really grown but that may be due to my own perception as to what academics really are.
 
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SilverCat

The Friendly Reapp Cat
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Aug 17, 2012
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I refuse to consider myself any older than 20.
 

anaesthetic

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Sep 22, 2014
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Before, during, and after medical school, I still felt like a kid pretending to be important.

Having finished intern year, I realize I've grown exponentially as a person. I think it's the combination of actually having some responsibility in the care of your patients and experiencing all of the ups and downs of being an intern. You'll have patients and nurses looking at you to make medical decisions at critical moments, most of the time without an attending or upper level present, and you'll realize that whatever you ordered will actually be given. It's easy to blow off learning "minutiae" as a medical student when you don't think it matters, but when you make wrong decisions that affect patients directly because you didn't know the minutiae, it will light a fire under your ass. I read and studied a lot more as an intern than I ever did as a medical student, and it paid off because at some point towards the end of the year, you will feel like you kind of know what you're doing and people calling you "doctor" in the hospital won't feel fraudulent anymore.
 

Psai

This space for lease
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Before, during, and after medical school, I still felt like a kid pretending to be important.

Having finished intern year, I realize I've grown exponentially as a person. I think it's the combination of actually having some responsibility in the care of your patients and experiencing all of the ups and downs of being an intern. You'll have patients and nurses looking at you to make medical decisions at critical moments, most of the time without an attending or upper level present, and you'll realize that whatever you ordered will actually be given. It's easy to blow off learning "minutiae" as a medical student when you don't think it matters, but when you make wrong decisions that affect patients directly because you didn't know the minutiae, it will light a fire under your ass. I read and studied a lot more as an intern than I ever did as a medical student, and it paid off because at some point towards the end of the year, you will feel like you kind of know what you're doing and people calling you "doctor" in the hospital won't feel fraudulent anymore.
Yes this is so true f. So many things that I didn't think were important in med school show up and I have to do a quick uptodate search. Definitely had those moments where I'm like holy **** I just made this decision and all these people are doing what I say, did I just do the right thing?
 

SurfingDoctor

"Hooray, I'm useful"
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Oct 20, 2005
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Having a wonderful time on Omicron Persei 8
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Yes this is so true f. So many things that I didn't think were important in med school show up and I have to do a quick uptodate search. Definitely had those moments where I'm like holy **** I just made this decision and all these people are doing what I say, did I just do the right thing?
This won't change at any point in your career. The mature things are owning up to mistakes, learning from them and moving on making sure you don't make the same mistakes again. That has been my approach when I make mistakes. We are all human and are prone to errors, but the best of us learn from those errors to make us better physicians.
 
Jun 13, 2016
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I never feel like an adult. Some of my undergrad friends tried to tell me that I seemed grown up because I got married and we own matching dishes and occasionally don't eat takeout but I never feel like I'm an adult. When I'm on my AIs I'm basically struck with sheer terror and feel like a 7 year old in her mom's white coat playing doctor with real lives.
 
Jun 22, 2015
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I am an MS3 and feel less like an adult than I did at the end of college and my gap year. I feel older but still somehow less of an adult.
 
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Cyal

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Oct 13, 2012
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I read and studied a lot more as an intern than I ever did as a medical student, and it paid off because at some point towards the end of the year, you will feel like you kind of know what you're doing and people calling you "doctor" in the hospital won't feel fraudulent anymore.
This is why I never understood people who say don't study before PGY1. I studied before intern year and it has been been helpful. And it was light studying which consisted of looking at cases and reviewing old information.
 

Señor S

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Jul 28, 2014
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Not at all. I'm the same jerkoff I always was.
 

Phloston

Lifetime Donor
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The fact that you'll get mixed responses about growing in med school or residency, or wherever, tells you the actual time point is irrelevant. People need their own impetuses to incite change in themselves, and everyone's journey is different.

The commonality you'll find in people's stories about growth mostly involve 1) gaining humility, and 2) acquiring a greater sense of putting others before themselves.

For 1, I think what it really comes down to is having setbacks/making mistakes, and growing from them, as SurfingDoctor has put it. Setbacks are blessings.

For 2, I believe it comes from #1. If one can work through his or her egocentricity and solipsism, then the focus is more on others.

Therefore I'd say the degree to which one genuinely thinks about others first corresponds directly with his or her level of humility.
 
Mar 8, 2015
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I think I did a lot of my growing up already, although I hope there will be more to come. I still do feel a bit uncomfortable interacting with the actually obviously adult people in my class (not a factor of age, it's just obvious, they feel more like coworkers than classmates). I guess that is a signal that I have not reached my final form yet.
 
Feb 25, 2016
105
115
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Medical Student
I feel like the opposite of many of those posting above- I feel like a 60 year old man in a 20-something body.

I spent a lot of my childhood around adults though and I've always considered myself somewhat more "mature" and intellectually focused than my peers.

Definitely don't feel like a 7th grader..
 
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Mad Jack

Critically Caring
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Jul 27, 2013
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I was going strong for 2 years. I regressed a lot socially, intellectually, and mostly sexually after getting my Step Scores back.
Did getting the triple twos give you a case of impotence and shatter your ego to the point you're no longer a human being?
 

MSTPlease

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Oct 11, 2009
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As a 7th year MD/PhD (MS3) I feel less mature/competent than I did coming out of college - although I still feel way more mature than the vast majority of my new classmates.
 
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OnePunchBiopsy

General Surgery
Feb 3, 2014
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I feel like I crossed the line from college kid to young-adult once I had a credit score, bills, and a car note to pay.
 

sloop

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May 12, 2015
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I definitely feel more mature, but I've also always been kind of "mature" for my age. I was 17 when I matriculated to college and, looking back, I was more mature at that time than most of my classmates were during senior year (and than many of my classmates were during MS1). I think a lot of it, though, is that I have a pretty resilient, laid back, emotionally stable, and somewhat stoic personality while also being an ambitious, driven person. I've always been that way. Time and experience interacting with classmates in college and med school has just helped me refine things by cultivating those aspects of my personality that are adaptive and mellow some of those that have been problematic.
 

zeppelinpage4

10+ Year Member
May 17, 2009
1,301
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I think I've become more mature in some ways...but I've regressed in others too.
 

osckey

5+ Year Member
Sep 12, 2013
733
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Medical Student
I'm on average, older than my first year peers. Having said that, I still feel like a little kid - especially given that so far M1 is the year of beating the confidence out of me while making me feel like a useless little kid.
 

fancymylotus

A Whole New World
10+ Year Member
Jul 21, 2004
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Compared to your self in college? and not necessarily just academically/intellectually
Like a little kid pretending to be a professional. Still amazed on a regular basis that people actually listen to me.
 

HybridEarth

2+ Year Member
Mar 27, 2015
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I feel like the same person I was my junior/senior years. Except I have to dress nicer because punk rock shirts don't give off a great vibe.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 

Kaz

7+ Year Member
Jan 1, 2012
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Over time, I've become a little more secure about certain topics and perceptions. For me, feeling like an adult has boiled down to this.
Sorry for being vague.

Lol what is this, 2006?