Sep 4, 2017
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Okay, y'all, I'm new to posting on SDN, so I hope I'm doing this right. I'm a freshman pre-med at a community college (to save money) and I finished all of my gen eds in high school through dual credit courses. Right now, I'm enrolled in General Bio, General Chem, General Psych, and a one credit tennis class. For next semester, I plan on taking Gen Chem 2, gen bio 2, gen psych 2 (or sociology), and statistics. I'm having trouble planning out my schedule for the next couple years. I plan on being a biochem major, so I need to fit in the rest of my prereq's and major classes. I'm transferring to a university next fall. Could someone lay out a possible timeline for my classes for me and/or give me some tips for planning? Also, what do y'all think of a biochem major for premed? Thank you!

Edit: I know next year I'll take O Chem and the year after that (university) I'll take Biochem.



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mellie0

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There are some schools that won't accept prereqs taken at a CC, so make sure you investigate those. Otherwise, it seems doable. I always recommend to take it easy at the beginning until you get used to college-level courses and then taking harder courseloads and classes as you go.
 
OP
L
Sep 4, 2017
5
1
Status
Pre-Medical
There are some schools that won't accept prereqs taken at a CC, so make sure you investigate those. Otherwise, it seems doable. I always recommend to take it easy at the beginning until you get used to college-level courses and then taking harder courseloads and classes as you go.
Thank you so much for the reply! I've looked on the websites of the med schools I'm interested. None of them appear to have any issue with it. I'm trying to take the minimal amount of prerequisites at my CC, but also trying to stay here for the cheaper price.


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mellie0

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Sounds good to me!!
 

21Rush12

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Anecdotally I had no trouble using CC credits for prerequisites, my major was Bio so I think I proved myself in upper level classes. I was interviewed at one of the schools that @gonnif likes to (accurately) cite as discouraging CC credits, so I'm sure it isn't set in stone. Keep on working hard, make sure you advocate for yourself and make sure your credits are confirmed to be transferable by schools you want to transfer to (and which class they will substitute for!), and get it in writing if you can.


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@Lagmdoc Biochemistry major may be difficult to complete on time considering the math requirement component. Often this math component is a prerequisite basis to prepare students for physical chemistry. All majors that are "biochemistry" are quite different aside from the basic prerequisites you have completed. I would advise that you talk to an academic counselor regarding your course time frame.
 

gonnif

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Anecdotally I had no trouble using CC credits for prerequisites, my major was Bio so I think I proved myself in upper level classes. I was interviewed at one of the schools that @gonnif likes to (accurately) cite as discouraging CC credits, so I'm sure it isn't set in stone. Keep on working hard, make sure you advocate for yourself and make sure your credits are confirmed to be transferable by schools you want to transfer to (and which class they will substitute for!), and get it in writing if you can.
Very few school have direct bans on prereqs from CC. Even JHU change that a few years ago
 
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OP
L
Sep 4, 2017
5
1
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Pre-Medical
@Lagmdoc Biochemistry major may be difficult to complete on time considering the math requirement component. Often this math component is a prerequisite basis to prepare students for physical chemistry. All majors that are "biochemistry" are quite different aside from the basic prerequisites you have completed. I would advise that you talk to an academic counselor regarding your course time frame.
Thank you for mentioning this! I was kind of nervous about not completing everything in time, but I'm a year ahead since I took a year of my gen eds through dual credits. Do you believe that will allow me to be on time?


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Thank you for mentioning this! I was kind of nervous about not completing everything in time, but I'm a year ahead since I took a year of my gen eds through dual credits. Do you believe that will allow me to be on time? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It's more efficient to filter this question through your own admissions office / course program. If you Google: "____ University + course requirements + Biochemistry major" then you can figure it out on your own.
 
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begoood95

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I would research the specific degree requirements for the biochemistry majors offered at the university to which you're transferring, first.
  • Are there courses that require prerequisites? What are the prerequisites, and can I take them at CC without repercussions?
  • Is the biochemistry tract very "structured," in that there are certain courses offered at specific semesters? If so, you'll want to pay attention to timing.
  • Last but not least: look at the courses required for biochemistry. Is it interesting to you? Do you see yourself excelling? Then, look at other majors you might be interested in, or feel as though you'd excel in. If something like, say, Anthropology or History or Literature interests you more—look into it. Because after all—and many adcoms will back me up—it is not the degree which you obtain that is impressive but your success in whichever degree you choose (3.8+ GPA is the goal). In other words, your major doesn't matter.*
In all, I think you have a good plan! Now focus on other things too—like your volunteering and extracurriculars and leadership positions—because they are just as if not more important than you academic success; these things will make you stand-out amongst the field of 3.8+/520's out there when you're vying for that spot at X Top 20.

*Your major slightly matters in some cases: a 3.8+ GPA for chemical engineering or some other math-intensive degree program is sometimes more impressive to some adcoms than a 3.8+ GPA in, say, Art History. Nevertheless, the consensus is that taking harder majors (or a combination of multiple majors) does not usually have any appreciable effect on your chances for admission into medical school.
 
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@begoood95 Do not pursue oncology. This is a joke.

In the same post you contradicted yourself saying that major doesn't matter, then you said it slightly matters, then concluding that it doesn't matter again. The joke is that if you were an oncologist you would be talking about tumors or benign or malignant matters of interest. A convoluted way of getting there, but here we are.
 
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OP
L
Sep 4, 2017
5
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I would research the specific degree requirements for the biochemistry majors offered at the university to which you're transferring, first.
  • Are there courses that require prerequisites? What are the prerequisites, and can I take them at CC without repercussions?
  • Is the biochemistry tract very "structured," in that there are certain courses offered at specific semesters? If so, you'll want to pay attention to timing.
  • Last but not least: look at the courses required for biochemistry. Is it interesting to you? Do you see yourself excelling? Then, look at other majors you might be interested in, or feel as though you'd excel in. If something like, say, Anthropology or History or Literature interests you more—look into it. Because after all—and many adcoms will back me up—it is not the degree which you obtain that is impressive but your success in whichever degree you choose (3.8+ GPA is the goal). In other words, your major doesn't matter.*
In all, I think you have a good plan! Now focus on other things too—like your volunteering and extracurriculars and leadership positions—because they are just as if not more important than you academic success; these things will make you stand-out amongst the field of 3.8+/520's out there when you're vying for that spot at X Top 20.

*Your major slightly matters in some cases: a 3.8+ GPA for chemical engineering or some other math-intensive degree program is sometimes more impressive to some adcoms than a 3.8+ GPA in, say, Art History. Nevertheless, the consensus is that taking harder majors (or a combination of multiple majors) does not usually have any appreciable effect on your chances for admission into medical school.
Thank you for this! Yes I understand that your major doesn't matter to admissions. I picked biochem because it's a major that I'm interested in and doesn't stray too far from the prerequisites.
As for extracurriculars, I'm a volunteer at a cat orphanage (yes, I LOVE cats), I just got hired at a scribe company, and I've joined a Christian organization and a pre health club at my school. I plan on applying for a research paid internship at a university this summer (they come recruit CC students), so hopefully I can get it.

The only thing left is to make sure I can stay organized and keep my grades and motivation up. :)


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begoood95

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@begoood95 Do not pursue oncology. This is a joke.

In the same post you contradicted yourself saying that major doesn't matter, then you said it slightly matters, then concluding that it doesn't matter again. The joke is that if you were an oncologist you would be talking about tumors or benign or malignant matters of interest. A convoluted way of getting there, but here we are.
I contradicted myself by saying "your major doesn't matter" with an asterisk, then noting that, on occasion, adcoms do indeed see the difference between majors? Ok. You're right, I shouldn't pursue oncology. Good thing you're out here patrolling these forums!

I'm saying that usually it doesn't matter, but in some cases it could. You don't understand nuance in the admissions process, that things aren't black and white?
 
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