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How should I spend my time right now because of COVID?

MSMsong

Full Member
Apr 30, 2020
37
10
36
  1. Pre-Medical
Hey all, I'll be graduating undergrad next month and was wondering if I can get some pointers on how I can spend time post graduation.

Initially the plan was to get hired for a scribe position somewhere, but I haven't heard back from ScribeAmerica or ScribeConnect yet. Given the fact that I applied in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas, I'm assuming that the positions through these large scribing organizations are highly competitive and they might not be looking to hire right now. I've pretty much exhausted other sites like Glassdoor, Indeed and Ziprecruiter but haven't heard back from anyone yet. Considering the fact that I only have emergency department experience and no scribing experience on my resume, maybe that's what's also hindering me from getting hired. Should I cold email private practices to see if they'd be willing to take me come June? Should I contact large hospitals asking if they have scribing opportunities?

I'm planning on getting EMT certified at some point over the summer to try and open up my options for jobs so I can apply to be a tech or EMT somewhere. But I really want to be a scribe and any advice on how I can get hired as one would help. I was really hoping that I could land a job post graduation, but it's looking pretty dismal right now, so how can I spend my time right now in a meaningful way that will help me get into medical school?

Currently, I'm signed up for classes at UCLA Extension, so I'll be doing an online post bacc to continue getting A's in my classes, but that's all I have set up right now. I want to get a job or find some sort of volunteer opportunity so I can have some more stuff to put on my resume. What should I do? Let me know, any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks!

Here's some information of where I'm at, it might help getting a better idea of what I need. I was going to study for the MCAT, but I wanted to wait until I took biochemistry and potentially some other relevant courses at UCLA Extension before I started to officially study for it
 

jhmmd

supernatural
Apr 28, 2020
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desert highway
Hmm, have you looked into patient transport or patient care attendant jobs? Pretty much the same thing but they don't require an EMT cert. Just in case you don't find a scribe job. You also might want to try mental health tech (ER tech jobs typically req. EMT certification, but mental health tech jobs don't). Good luck and hope this helps! :)
 
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MSMsong

Full Member
Apr 30, 2020
37
10
36
  1. Pre-Medical
Hmm, have you looked into patient transport or patient care attendant jobs? Pretty much the same thing but they don't require an EMT cert. Just in case you don't find a scribe job. You also might want to try mental health tech (ER tech jobs typically req. EMT certification, but mental health tech jobs don't). Good luck and hope this helps! :)
Hey jhkmd, how would getting a job as a behavioral health technician (mental health tech) look to medical school counselors? I really want to work as a scribe, but I want to have something else to do while I wait to hear back from various places in case ScribeAmerica or other places don't get back to me for a while. Let me know, thanks!
 
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GreenDuck12

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2014
2,107
2,271
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  1. Medical Student
EMT certifications can be a long process and depending on where you are located the market is oversaturated by premeds. In my area, volunteer EMT shifts fill up months in advance due to the high number of premeds who pursue this route to getting clinical exposure. If the market in your area is positive, I would say go for it if it interests you.

Getting exposure in a medical setting where you are interacting with patients and staff, and learning how staff interact with patients is a plus. Jumping straight into scribing can be a challenge. If there are training courses I would look into those just to help move you up the pile of applicants. Additionally, getting any medical experience will help future job applications if you aren't able to land the position you are looking for initially.

One thing you should also keep in mind is that it is not necessary for your have paid employment in a medical setting to have a competitive application for medical school. You do need to have clinical exposure, whether that be from volunteering or paid employment makes little difference. I've come across some really competitive applicants with compelling stories who had a wide variety of post undergraduate employment.
 
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MSMsong

Full Member
Apr 30, 2020
37
10
36
  1. Pre-Medical
EMT certifications can be a long process and depending on where you are located the market is oversaturated by premeds. In my area, volunteer EMT shifts fill up months in advance due to the high number of premeds who pursue this route to getting clinical exposure. If the market in your area is positive, I would say go for it if it interests you.

Getting exposure in a medical setting where you are interacting with patients and staff, and learning how staff interact with patients is a plus. Jumping straight into scribing can be a challenge. If there are training courses I would look into those just to help move you up the pile of applicants. Additionally, getting any medical experience will help future job applications if you aren't able to land the position you are looking for initially.

One thing you should also keep in mind is that it is not necessary for your have paid employment in a medical setting to have a competitive application for medical school. You do need to have clinical exposure, whether that be from volunteering or paid employment makes little difference. I've come across some really competitive applicants with compelling stories who had a wide variety of post undergraduate employment.
Hey GreenDuck12, thanks for the insight. I'm afraid the EMT job market is also pretty saturated where I'm living and I'll probably run into the same problem I am right now with trying to land a scribing job. I know I don't have to necessarily have paid clinical exposure, but it'll definitely benefit me since I'll be earning money while working in a medical office.

Question for you or @Goro I know people don't hold chiropractors to a high standard, but would it be alright for me to scribe at a chiropractor's office so that I can get scribing experience so hospitals or private medical practices would be more likely to hire me? Or does it not work like that? Let me know, thanks!
 
D

deleted1040417

One thing you should also keep in mind is that it is not necessary for your have paid employment in a medical setting to have a competitive application for medical school. You do need to have clinical exposure, whether that be from volunteering or paid employment makes little difference. I've come across some really competitive applicants with compelling stories who had a wide variety of post undergraduate employment.

Wouldn't 200 hours of employment and volunteering be viewed differently? Most people say anything less than 6 months of scribing, for example, is not enough exposure. However 200 hours of volunteering makes good clinical exposure. Is this because of the long-term commitment adcoms would like to see?
 
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HouseJC

If nobody hates you, you're doing something wrong
2+ Year Member
Mar 22, 2019
427
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  1. Medical Student
It's hard to say, as its not just a numbers game. You can have A LOT of hours, but if you can't articulate what you did in your descriptions/MMEs/personal statement/secondaries, it will not reflect on you during the review process. In fact, it might backfire and make you look like a stat padder. But yes, long-term consistent commitment will be more favorable, as it demonstrates who you are and that you value the opportunity/ties despite everything else going on in your lives.
 
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Jun 11, 2010
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Hey GreenDuck12, thanks for the insight. I'm afraid the EMT job market is also pretty saturated where I'm living and I'll probably run into the same problem I am right now with trying to land a scribing job. I know I don't have to necessarily have paid clinical exposure, but it'll definitely benefit me since I'll be earning money while working in a medical office.

Question for you or @Goro I know people don't hold chiropractors to a high standard, but would it be alright for me to scribe at a chiropractor's office so that I can get scribing experience so hospitals or private medical practices would be more likely to hire me? Or does it not work like that? Let me know, thanks!
It's employment and you can also say that it allowed you a window to explore other career options. Just don't use it as honest to god shadowing or clinical experiece.
 
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GreenDuck12

Full Member
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Mar 30, 2014
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  1. Medical Student
Wouldn't 200 hours of employment and volunteering be viewed differently? Most people say anything less than 6 months of scribing, for example, is not enough exposure. However 200 hours of volunteering makes good clinical exposure. Is this because of the long-term commitment adcoms would like to see?

My point with the employment piece above wasn’t to discourage the OP from working in a medical setting or continuing to seek employment in one. Instead, I was trying to highlight that there are many different types of employment that can look interesting on a medical school application should other positions be out of reach for now given how competitive they are. But yes, volunteering looks differently than paid employment.
 
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D

deleted1040417

My point with the employment piece above wasn’t to discourage the OP from working in a medical setting or continuing to seek employment in one. Instead, I was trying to highlight that there are many different types of employment that can look interesting on a medical school application should other positions be out of reach for now given how competitive they are. But yes, volunteering looks differently than paid employment.

I no means was I trying to take a jab at you (sorry if it seemed), honest question that may help others as well. Idk much myself hehe.
 
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