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How to be competitive for neuro postdoc

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by TiptoeConqueror, Nov 22, 2017.

  1. TiptoeConqueror

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    To prevent me from going insane waiting to hear back from internship sites, I’m just curious what I need to do to be competitive for neuro postdocs aside from landing a neuro internship? Any advice is much appreciated!
     
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  3. Kadhir

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    Many previous threads on this. One piece of advice that routinely pops up is publish and present at conferences to the extent you can. This is valued in any specialty, but especially in neuropsychology.
     
  4. TiptoeConqueror

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    Can you post a link to these previous posts? I’m having trouble finding them.
     
  5. Pragma

    Pragma Neuropsychologist
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    Definitely publications, as well as solid letters from boarded people.
     
  6. CatsFan

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    This is something I've been wondering about lately--how important is it to have letters from boarded people? If I love an internship site, but the primary supervisor is early career/not boarded, am I shooting myself in the foot for post-doc if I still rank them highly and match there?
     
  7. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Boarding is better, but not necessarily required.
     
  8. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member

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    grad school:

    PCSAS or scientist practitioner program
    Neuroscience/neuropsychology dissertation
    Mentor, board certified neuropsych clinical mentorship
    Some number of integrated neuropsych reports
    Publish and present

    Internship:
    Division 40 internship
    Board certified clinical mentorship
    Strong letters from said neuropsychologists
    Publish/present
    d
     
  9. Justanothergrad

    Justanothergrad Counseling Psychologist
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    I always heard students saying that a 100% neuro / div40 internship was required to get a neuro post doc, but I've seen numerous folks (100% of those who have tried) go from a generalist internship to a neuro postdoc at extremely well reputed places. I'm sure it was the neuro research and previous training experiences along the way that made them stand out, as well as neuro tracks in internship to solidify that training. My point is that, from an outsiders perspective, it seems there may be several ways to that skin the cat so long as (1) neuro clinical experience and (2) neuro-related research are developed.

    I'm not sure if my perspective has been full of outliers or not- I'm curious what the neuro folks say.
     
  10. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Many students are misinformed about the Houston Conference guidelines. I keep hearing this 50% internship myth trotted out. You can get good postdocs with a generalist internship, but those are mostly people with heavy neuro backgrounds in grad school who also had good research experiences. So yes, definitely more than one way to get where you need to go, it's the totality of experience, not just the experience at one stop along the way.
     
  11. Justanothergrad

    Justanothergrad Counseling Psychologist
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    Wonder where that 50% myth got started? It seems like it is a really pervasive one.
     
  12. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Probably a mis-read of the HCGs. It does state "The expected period of residency extends for the equivalent of two years of full-time education and training. The residency experience must occur on at least a half-time basis."

    But this refers to postdoc, and still isn't the same.
     
  13. AcronymAllergy

    AcronymAllergy Neuropsychologist
    Moderator Psychologist Gold Donor Classifieds Approved

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    I tracked down the origin of the "50% rule" a few years back, but can't remember exactly where it originated. I think it might've been a paper that either Reitan or Greiffenstein wrote describing their thoughts on what they felt would qualify someone for practice in neuropsychology. I believe it was either right before the HCG or soon after their release.

    Edit: I stand corrected. At least somewhat, unless Reitan or Greiffenstein wrote a follow-up paper later. The 50% rule comes from INS/Div. 40's initial guidelines in 1987 on internship training in neuropsychology. Title of the paper for those interested (it's in the Clinical Neuropsychologist):
    Reports of the ins - division 40 task force on education, accreditation, and credentialing: Guidelines for doctoral training programs in clinical neuropsychology
     
    #12 AcronymAllergy, Dec 12, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
    Jon Snow and Justanothergrad like this.

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