CrazyLikeAFox

10+ Year Member
Apr 3, 2007
44
0
0
Status
I will be starting a program in epidemiology in the fall.

What should I be doing during my time at school to ensure a job when I graduate? Should I be doing an internship the whole time? Take a job during the summer? Are there special certificates I should be pursuing?

I am just curious what is the best approach (other than the obvious of doing well in classes etc).

Any recent grads out there that wish they knew something before starting? thanks!
 

Stories

Life Afficianado
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2009
1,700
109
281
Los Angeles, CA
Got a job that utilizes epidemiology skills and work it during the whole time you're a student. The more experience you have, the better. You'll also have an internship at some point during your time as a student, so you should have at least 2 separate experiences on your resume at graduation.

Grades are nowhere near as important as that experience and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Unless, of course, you'd like to pursue further education beyond the masters. In which case, get A's in all our course (grad grades are higher than undergrad grades so you should be able to maintain a very high GPA).
 

CrazyLikeAFox

10+ Year Member
Apr 3, 2007
44
0
0
Status
Thanks for the reply

Would this include working on campus in the department or should i look off campus. Sorry about all of the questions i just want to make the best of my time in school.

Also, would working in a health related position, but not necessarily epi, help as well?

Thanks
 

Stories

Life Afficianado
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2009
1,700
109
281
Los Angeles, CA
Thanks for the reply

Would this include working on campus in the department or should i look off campus. Sorry about all of the questions i just want to make the best of my time in school.

Also, would working in a health related position, but not necessarily epi, help as well?

Thanks
Experience is most helpful if it's directly related to what you want to do in the future or if the skills you learn at that job are transferable. If the job has no relevance to anything you want to do in the future, then it's a waste of your time. Location does not matter.

Keep in mind, even doing this will not "ensure" you a job. It'll significantly improve your odds, though.