coldcase331

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So my first exam is tomorrow and I feel like I've put in some good work to memorize/understand the material. However, I feel like the sheer volume of it is making it difficult to be competent in 100% of material. After talking to a lot of people in my class, it seems like we're all in the same boat. I just want to know if this is a normal thing for medical school, to never feel 100% going into a test. In undergrad I always felt like I was able to truly master the information, but I feel like it's nearly impossible in medical school.
 

VisionaryTics

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So my first exam is tomorrow and I feel like I've put in some good work to memorize/understand the material. However, I feel like the sheer volume of it is making it difficult to be competent in 100% of material. After talking to a lot of people in my class, it seems like we're all in the same boat. I just want to know if this is a normal thing for medical school, to never feel 100% going into a test. In undergrad I always felt like I was able to truly master the information, but I feel like it's nearly impossible in medical school.
 
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eteshoe

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... But (no pun intended) in actuality just brace yourself, do your best, and use the exam as an opportunity to see if your efforts have to be adjusted for the next one.
 

Spikebd

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So my first exam is tomorrow and I feel like I've put in some good work to memorize/understand the material. However, I feel like the sheer volume of it is making it difficult to be competent in 100% of material. After talking to a lot of people in my class, it seems like we're all in the same boat. I just want to know if this is a normal thing for medical school, to never feel 100% going into a test. In undergrad I always felt like I was able to truly master the information, but I feel like it's nearly impossible in medical school.
Keep it up, sounds like you've got the right attitude to be successful. Work as hard as you ever have during the first couple months of medical school and find out how you do from there. My experience was that whenever I let my guard down was when I did poorly, don't let up!
 
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operaman

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I feel like I studied my arse off every day until one day an exam happened. Feeling 100% in ownership of the material never happened for me. Still hasn't. Get humbled pretty much daily my the sheer vastness and complexity that is medicine.
 

Syncrohnize

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So my first exam is tomorrow and I feel like I've put in some good work to memorize/understand the material. However, I feel like the sheer volume of it is making it difficult to be competent in 100% of material. After talking to a lot of people in my class, it seems like we're all in the same boat. I just want to know if this is a normal thing for medical school, to never feel 100% going into a test. In undergrad I always felt like I was able to truly master the information, but I feel like it's nearly impossible in medical school.

I was honestly more nervous for my first college calc exam and that turned out to be way easier than med school tests. The approach to the test was pretty miserable overall and like I felt like I just had poured all my energy into memorizing and understanding everything in the Coursepack. I wasn't nervous walking in because to get to med school I feel like all of us have had their fair share of tests. The first test wasn't bad and I did almost a SD better than average on the written section. Don't get me wrong, every school has that one (or multiple) notorious exams that are known for their difficulty. It's just that most medical schools are smart enough to know not to make it the first exam.

Side note: I know you haven't taken your test yet, but take your results with a grain of salt. It's one thing to always set high goals but it's another to sabotage yourself by letting pre-medical school ideals/goals ruin the equilibrium you've built for yourself over these last 21-24 years. My mistake was not settling for my performance after my first couple exams and trying to go to extreme measures (less sleep, more caffeine, mild self-hate) to do even better. In undergrad, my academic schedule consisted of working my hardest and then doing well on the test and then enjoying the hell out of the next few days. In medical school, that cycle totally broke off as I never felt satisfied with my scores so I never got a mental-break (at our school we get our results once we hit submit). Sometimes, I would literally spend the entire post-exam day pre-reading the material for the next day angry at myself for not doing as well as I thought I should have. While I was never in any sort of academic jeopardy, I feel like this mentality led to a general decline in my performance overall as my grades got progressively worse as the year progressed.

Try as hard as you can for the first couple semesters and if you're in the top 5/10% awesome. If you're not, don't erode your state of well-being trying to get yourself there. Always do your best, but give yourself adequate rest.
 

sloop

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Recognition is the key to med school. Know that you could recognize the rights answers. You don't need to feel confident that you could produce them without options.
Yeah, but this is only good advice if your school is exclusively multiple choice or your recommendation is solely regarding usmle exams, etc. At my school, a significant portion of each exam in every first year subject relied on essays. So for immunology, for instance, it was not enough to just recognize concepts—you had to be able to write an essay explaining the process of inflammation from start to finish, cytokines and all. Second year and on, the game was all multiple choice though.
 
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Yeah, but this is only good advice if your school is exclusively multiple choice or your recommendation is solely regarding usmle exams, etc. At my school, a significant portion of each exam in every first year subject relied on essays. So for immunology, for instance, it was not enough to just recognize concepts—you had to be able to write an essay explaining the process of inflammation from start to finish, cytokines and all. Second year and on, the game was all multiple choice though.
Wow I have never heard of that in medical school.
 

Taddy Mason

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Wow I have never heard of that in medical school.
During 1st and 2nd year we only had exams at the end of each block and they consisted of 1 day of two 4hr essay tests and 1 day with a 180 question MCQ exam. So if you relied primarily on recognition and couldn't explain concepts in solid detail etc. you were pretty much f-ed for the essay tests.
 
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bon22

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Don't forget to bring a diaper to each exam. I go through a lot of them.
 
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Goro

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By this point in time you have learned all you can learn, so now it's important to quit fussing and just go take the damn test. And do your best, because that's all you can do.

Most med students know more than they think they know, too.


So my first exam is tomorrow and I feel like I've put in some good work to memorize/understand the material. However, I feel like the sheer volume of it is making it difficult to be competent in 100% of material. After talking to a lot of people in my class, it seems like we're all in the same boat. I just want to know if this is a normal thing for medical school, to never feel 100% going into a test. In undergrad I always felt like I was able to truly master the information, but I feel like it's nearly impossible in medical school.
 
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coldcase331

coldcase331

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I'm not shooting for AOA, watching college football on Saturdays is a must for me.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile app
 
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