How to get business experience for MBA as an MD student?

a1s30

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    Third year MD student here. I'm interested in pursuing an MBA after medical school and I've noticed that some of the top programs I was looking at (Yale, Duke, U Chicago Booth, etc.) all value at least 3-4 years of work experience for their MBA applicants. What's a feasible way I can start to get some business experience while managing the rotations and future residency schedules at the same time? I'm specifically interested in consumer medical technologies but I'm open to anything. This is the time to explore after all!
    I'm sure residency will count as work experience on paper but I assume having some other business oriented experiences would strengthen my application overall and bring me up to par with other applicants. I would be completely wrong, so feel free to correct me. Thanks in advance.

    EDIT: Forgot to add this before posting, but future goals are to ultimately transition away from medicine and traditional clinical work and instead work in the tech sector. Possibly doing a leadership role in marketing or design there. Not a fully developed goal but I know I want to go in that general direction. I'm not too interested in healthcare administration/management/business either.

    ANOTHER EDIT: I've been researching some related threads and it seems that the general consensus is that MDs are valued for their knowledge and ability to contribute that knowledge regardless of whether they have an MBA or not. While I understand and agree with that perspective, that is not the type of role I envision for myself. I want to be actively involved in a leadership position rather than serve as a consultant or advisor on the "sidelines". The MD will get me a lot of places but companies that I want to work with (Google, Apple, etc.) will obviously go for a qualified applicant rather than the person with the MD and no formal business experience. That's just how I see it.
     
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    GoSpursGo

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      The short answer is you can't. Residency is a full time job.

      Some residencies and/or fellowships may have special tracks that allow you to get an MBA while in training, so those programs are probably ones that you should target when applying to residency/fellowship. Alternatively, you could practice clinically for some number of years. But bottom line, you're not going to be like any other applicant with traditional experiences, you're going to be a doctor who has a specific interest in obtaining an MBA. Presuming that you can articulate why you want the MBA, I would imagine that will make you an interesting applicant.
       
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      a1s30

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        The short answer is you can't. Residency is a full time job.

        Some residencies and/or fellowships may have special tracks that allow you to get an MBA while in training, so those programs are probably ones that you should target when applying to residency/fellowship. Alternatively, you could practice clinically for some number of years. But bottom line, you're not going to be like any other applicant with traditional experiences, you're going to be a doctor who has a specific interest in obtaining an MBA. Presuming that you can articulate why you want the MBA, I would imagine that will make you an interesting applicant.

        Thank you for the input! I'll definitely have to do some research in those residency+MBA programs and see what they have to offer. But you do bring up a great point about how I'll be a doctor with a specific interest in obtaining an MBA. Hopefully that's enough to get me in front of admissions committees but that's when I figured having specific business experience would be helpful and enrich the application further.
         
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        Dave1980

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          Thank you for the input! I'll definitely have to do some research in those residency+MBA programs and see what they have to offer. But you do bring up a great point about how I'll be a doctor with a specific interest in obtaining an MBA. Hopefully that's enough to get me in front of admissions committees but that's when I figured having specific business experience would be helpful and enrich the application further.
          having an MD will not get you admission into a top business school.

          you need more than interest.
           

          Dave1980

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            Third year MD student here. I'm interested in pursuing an MBA after medical school and I've noticed that some of the top programs I was looking at (Yale, Duke, U Chicago Booth, etc.) all value at least 3-4 years of work experience for their MBA applicants. What's a feasible way I can start to get some business experience while managing the rotations and future residency schedules at the same time? I'm specifically interested in consumer medical technologies but I'm open to anything. This is the time to explore after all!
            I'm sure residency will count as work experience on paper but I assume having some other business oriented experiences would strengthen my application overall and bring me up to par with other applicants. I would be completely wrong, so feel free to correct me. Thanks in advance.

            EDIT: Forgot to add this before posting, but future goals are to ultimately transition away from medicine and traditional clinical work and instead work in the tech sector. Possibly doing a leadership role in marketing or design there. Not a fully developed goal but I know I want to go in that general direction. I'm not too interested in healthcare administration/management/business either.

            ANOTHER EDIT: I've been researching some related threads and it seems that the general consensus is that MDs are valued for their knowledge and ability to contribute that knowledge regardless of whether they have an MBA or not. While I understand and agree with that perspective, that is not the type of role I envision for myself. I want to be actively involved in a leadership position rather than serve as a consultant or advisor on the "sidelines". The MD will get me a lot of places but companies that I want to work with (Google, Apple, etc.) will obviously go for a qualified applicant rather than the person with the MD and no formal business experience. That's just how I see it.

            I am surprised by how often this needs to get said but going to med school without wanting to go into clinical medicine is not a good financial plan. it's almost a useless degree without residency...rightfully so
             
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            a1s30

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              I am surprised by how often this needs to get said but going to med school without wanting to go into clinical medicine is not a good financial plan. it's almost a useless degree without residency...rightfully so

              With all due respect, I'd have to disagree. MDs that end up going into business, consulting, or research (to name a few) make a decent income and enough to justify and pay back their degree. The overwhelming majority of medical students obviously aim for clinical work, but there are other career paths out there that don't always have to circle back to clinical work. I think the entire medical community (especially MDs and DOs) need to normalize the idea of people taking "alternative" paths after a residency and proper certification/licensing, but that is a different topic of conversation. My plans for residency are still intact but I do not want to follow in the footsteps of traditional clinical work since that's not what I'm entirely interested in.

              having an MD will not get you admission into a top business school.

              you need more than interest.

              Again, with all due respect, my original post did allude to the fact that I was searching for ways to become involved early on so I could show more than just interest at the end of the day. I also mentioned that an MD will get me a lot of places except for a position that I'm unqualified for. Hence the reason why I was seeking out some advice! 😀
               

              Dave1980

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                With all due respect, I'd have to disagree. MDs that end up going into business, consulting, or research (to name a few) make a decent income and enough to justify and pay back their degree.

                Just because a few people have done it does not mean it is a viable plan. Otherwise I'd be spending my salary on lottery tickets.
                 

                a1s30

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                  Just because a few people have done it does not mean it is a viable plan. Otherwise I'd be spending my salary on lottery tickets.

                  I think it's a pretty viable plan for anyone that is interested in and willing to pursue it. On the same token, just because a few people stuck with clinical medicine until day 1 of retirement does not mean it's a viable plan for anyone else. I don't see any problem with a physician integrating their degree and knowledge base with another industry; whether this is brought on by pure inherent interest or physician burnout. If everyone went for clinical work only:
                  -insurance companies wouldn't have a medical advisor to draft guidelines for patient care
                  -medical schools wouldn't have experienced and knowledgable professors teaching the next generation of physicians
                  -biomedical technology companies would be lacking in proper clinical and medical knowledge about their newest inventions

                  There are countless more examples but the point I'm trying to get across is that physicians can serve numerous roles in the world outside of basic everyday office work. It's not only viable, but absolutely necessary to help our society function. Hope that helps.
                   

                  AD04

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                    OP,

                    If you're a beast, you can start your own business while in medical school. It is high risk, high reward scenario as it could affect your clinical career down the line (lower grades in medical school and on licensing exams which will limit your options for residency). I recommend you finish residency and become board-certified as that will open a lot more doors. Jump into private practice afterwards or get involved with administration in big institutions and those will count to as business experience.

                    Frankly, I think MBA is a waste of money and time. Business is market-dependent. If you're good at business (e.g. negotiation, marketing, tax optimization, product / service positioning, etc. ), you'll make money no matter if you have a business degree or not.
                     
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                    a1s30

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                      OP,

                      If you're a beast, you can start your own business while in medical school. It is high risk, high reward scenario as it could affect your clinical career down the line (lower grades in medical school and on licensing exams which will limit your options for residency). I recommend you finish residency and become board-certified as that will open a lot more doors. Jump into private practice afterwards or get involved with administration in big institutions and those will count to as business experience.

                      Frankly, I think MBA is a waste of money and time. Business is market-dependent. If you're good at business (e.g. negotiation, marketing, tax optimization, product / service positioning, etc. ), you'll make money no matter if you have a business degree or not.
                      Very solid advice, so thank you for that. I'm definitely interested in starting my own business but I was going for the MBA with the intention of working in a larger company as a leader or chief officer of some sort. That's when I thought an MBA plus whatever business related experience would come in handy. Nonetheless, definitely it will all have to come after residency!
                       

                      ChordaEpiphany

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                        having an MD will not get you admission into a top business school.
                        Yup. While I bemoan the fact that HBS and Wharton grads get to make off with huge sums of money at a young age for relatively little work, your MD won't cut it. Likely your grades and test scores will be more than enough. Even top 10 business schools aren't as competitive as top 50 med schools, but your application is built for med school, not B school. The path you want to be on for an "easy" entry to top B school is management consulting or a stab at the startup world. Bonus points for spending your rich parents' money on a startup that was destined for failure from the start.
                        With all due respect, I'd have to disagree. MDs that end up going into business, consulting, or research (to name a few) make a decent income and enough to justify and pay back their degree.
                        Going into business, consulting, or research as an MD without doing a residency is throwing money down the drain. A surgeon who left academia to start a consulting company spoke at my school and literally said, "an MD without a residency is a useless language degree." Want to make more money than a doctor as an MD? Go to a top med school, do a top residency, do a top fellowship, and then either immediately leave or practice in an academic center for a few years. Then, go into consulting, pharma, etc...
                        I think the entire medical community (especially MDs and DOs) need to normalize the idea of people taking "alternative" paths after a residency and proper certification/licensing
                        Absolutely not. The entire medical community needs to normalize the idea of not training people unnecessarily. You want med school to be the next law school? I don't need anyone to normalize anything for me. If better opportunities arise for MDs, I'll take those opportunities.
                         

                        AD04

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                          The MD will get me a lot of places but companies that I want to work with (Google, Apple, etc.) will obviously go for a qualified applicant rather than the person with the MD and no formal business experience.

                          I see where you're coming from now. Why did you go into medical school if you wanted to work for large corporations?

                          People who pursue medicine but want to be a c-level executives in a large company tend to target CMO positions. That's where the education and experience adds value. I don't see how MD / DO would add value for a c-level position for big tech unless it is to work in some type of capacity that requires medical expertise.

                          I'm under the wing of my institution's CMO but he doesn't have MBA. He's really smart and really good at what he does -- building medical institutions. A good friend of mine wants to be CMO of a large pharmaceutical company and would like to work for the one of the large companies you're targeting. He doesn't have MBA but has MD / JD and was has an executive insider vouching for him. Both of these people completed residency.

                          And I also know a few physicians with MBA and not much came out of that (e.g. running their own practice or working as a clinician when they could have done that without MBA).

                          At the end of the day, if you're good and you can produce results, you can get into a lot of places without the proper credentials.
                           
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                          shispare

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                            There are several factors to consider here.

                            First, the highest probability bet for a doctor who wants to get into a top MBA is to already be admitted to the associated medical school. Naturally this isn't exactly easy, but most schools that offer both MD and MBA offer 5 year combined degree programs, and you could certainly choose to use the strength of the affiliated B-school as something of a tiebreaker should you have a choice between more than one medical school.

                            That said, you really should reflect on exactly what value the MBA offers you. It serves several primary purposes. The first is offering access to recruiting pipelines that are nearly closed otherwise. These pipelines include the well-known tracks in finance and consulting, and also management training programs/fast-track jobs with major corps whether it's tech, pharma, industrials, or any other industry. It is FAR easier to get onto a good track such as these if you come through a recruiting pipeline. Another reason people get an MBA is to rebrand either their pedigree or their industry (mediocre undergrad-->better MBA brand-->more opportunity) or (works in widget manufacturing --->wants more money/career switch --> leaves for finance after MBA). A third reason is because it's required for professional advancement (employer won't let you progress without a graduate degree). Fourth and least significant reason, being candid, is actual learning and knowledge development. This is the least important of them because it can be had more cheaply and faster with real world experience and some dedicated reading on your own. 2 years of lost attending salary + 2 years of additional debt is a huge opportunity cost for physicians who get a full-time MBA after med school, and bluntly speaking the simple "know-how" you get from the degree is almost never worth it unless you can tap in to one of the primary purposes I mentioned above. In this scenario executive MBA is the way to go, not full-time.

                            Unfortunately, none of these fit especially well with the career track of physicians, even those with business interests as long-term goals. To go through 4 years of med school and 3+ years of residency, just to follow this up with 2 more years of expensive school for the privilege of jumping on an entry-level career track with minimal job security and letting your actual specialized knowledge atrophy is an extremely poor bet and use of time, especially when the MD adds very little competitive value to your profile as an applicant for these roles. From a rebranding perspective, a US MD doesn't gain much additional "pedigree" from any MBA unless it's H/S/W, and even then it's of rather dubious value relative to your primary degree. Should you want to change industries, the MD is worse than useless and would be viewed as a red-flag by any prospective employer. Moving into management within your organization by virtue of getting an MBA sometimes works for MD's who want to lead hospitals/healthcare organizations, get involved in certain capacities within the healthcare industry etc, but it's more of a feather in the cap than a real prerequisite in these scenarios. I'd much rather have strong/deep networks from top-flight residency training than a weak medical CV with a shiny MBA for roles like this. For entrepreneurship, again the MBA is a feather in the cap but certainly not necessary.

                            If you really just want to move into biotech and want some specialized knowledge, why not get a rigorous masters in bioengineering, pharmaceuticals, or some related field at a university with a good MBA program and follow that up with an MBA application? You'll save enormous amounts of time, effort, and money; arguably the time that you don't waste on clinical training you'll never use can be put towards either building a business, doing internships, or finding other ways to get far more directly applicable experience to your real goals. In any career (business, medicine, you name it) time is truly your most valuable asset, and collecting baubles without an extremely clear value-add is a practice best avoided. Climbing to true leadership roles (as opposed to mere advisor-type roles) is also much more about innate gumption, savvy, and ability to play the game than collecting credentials once you have the bare prerequisites to get in the door and be taken seriously.
                             
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                            a1s30

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                              Yup. While I bemoan the fact that HBS and Wharton grads get to make off with huge sums of money at a young age for relatively little work, your MD won't cut it. Likely your grades and test scores will be more than enough. Even top 10 business schools aren't as competitive as top 50 med schools, but your application is built for med school, not B school. The path you want to be on for an "easy" entry to top B school is management consulting or a stab at the startup world. Bonus points for spending your rich parents' money on a startup that was destined for failure from the start.

                              Thanks for the input. I understand that my MD will not cut it for entry into a top business school. And just like you said, the path that one should be on for "easy" entry is management consulting or startups. That's the experience and advice I was hoping to hear about. How a person like me (MD -> residency -> business) would get experience like that. I find it hard to believe that there are companies/startups/organizations that wouldn't value and give experience to an MD student.

                              Going into business, consulting, or research as an MD without doing a residency is throwing money down the drain. A surgeon who left academia to start a consulting company spoke at my school and literally said, "an MD without a residency is a useless language degree." Want to make more money than a doctor as an MD? Go to a top med school, do a top residency, do a top fellowship, and then either immediately leave or practice in an academic center for a few years. Then, go into consulting, pharma, etc...

                              Just like I said in my original post, my plans for residency and even a top fellowship are still intact. I knew that was the bare minimum from the very beginning, before I even decided to show interest in getting involved with the business/MBA world. And just like I alluded to as well, I would "immediately leave" and then transition into the roles such as the ones you listed. I came on here looking for advice to how I as a third year could start to become involved in that world (if there is a way to begin with). I'm sure someone on here has done something similar.

                              Absolutely not. The entire medical community needs to normalize the idea of not training people unnecessarily. You want med school to be the next law school? I don't need anyone to normalize anything for me. If better opportunities arise for MDs, I'll take those opportunities.

                              I respect your opinion, but there's no need to normalize the idea of people training unnecessarily because majority of medical students have intentions to practice clinically. Doesn't really sound like unnecessary training to me. Medical school becoming the next law school shouldn't be a concern either. Entry to medical school is gated by prerequisites and an entry exam, both of which are highly dependent on one another. Anyone can study for the LSAT despite their background and course schedule in undergraduate. The MCAT tests on information taught in specific, mandatory prerequisite courses. I don't think any comparison can be drawn there. Nonetheless, I do agree that taking advantage of better opportunities for M.D.s is beneficial. With the physician shortage that AAMC has forecasted (see: AAMC Report Reinforces Mounting Physician Shortage), I think that better opportunities should be created so it prevents physician burnout or medical student dropout. It's a separate topic from my original post, but I think it's something everyone should think about.
                               

                              a1s30

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                                I see where you're coming from now. Why did you go into medical school if you wanted to work for large corporations?

                                People who pursue medicine but want to be a c-level executives in a large company tend to target CMO positions. That's where the education and experience adds value. I don't see how MD / DO would add value for a c-level position for big tech unless it is to work in some type of capacity that requires medical expertise.

                                I'm under the wing of my institution's CMO but he doesn't have MBA. He's really smart and really good at what he does -- building medical institutions. A good friend of mine wants to be CMO of a large pharmaceutical company and would like to work for the one of the large companies you're targeting. He doesn't have MBA but has MD / JD and was has an executive insider vouching for him. Both of these people completed residency.

                                And I also know a few physicians with MBA and not much came out of that (e.g. running their own practice or working as a clinician when they could have done that without MBA).

                                At the end of the day, if you're good and you can produce results, you can get into a lot of places without the proper credentials.

                                The business/MBA world is a newfound interest of mine. I came into medical school without any higher career goals other than "being a doctor". I wasn't too keen on it but I didn't know what else existed outside of it. As I met more people and did some basic research, I realized that I had an interest in biotech and businesses in that circle. So I figured I could work towards that sweet spot of doing both.

                                Thanks for the advice. You do bring up a solid point about being good and producing results. Especially with your friend who had an exec vouching for him. Ultimately I know I will learn 10 fold more than I do right now at the early stages of my formal clinical experience, but I figured having an MBA would not only open up the doors for networking and experience, but also lend some credibility to my background as a whole and set me up to work in those larger corporations doing leadership and management. I would obviously want to find something that allows me to contribute medical expertise at the same time. But I think all signs point to me figuring out those next steps a little bit down the line, possibly while I'm in residency even!
                                 

                                ChordaEpiphany

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                                  There are several factors to consider here.

                                  [...]

                                  If you really just want to move into biotech and want some specialized knowledge, why not get a rigorous masters in bioengineering, pharmaceuticals, or some related field at a university with a good MBA program and follow that up with an MBA application? You'll save enormous amounts of time, effort, and money; arguably the time that you don't waste on clinical training you'll never use can be put towards either building a business, doing internships, or finding other ways to get far more directly applicable experience to your real goals. In any career (business, medicine, you name it) time is truly your most valuable asset, and collecting baubles without an extremely clear value-add is a practice best avoided. Climbing to true leadership roles (as opposed to mere advisor-type roles) is also much more about innate gumption, savvy, and ability to play the game than collecting credentials once you have the bare prerequisites to get in the door and be taken seriously.
                                  I agree with the vast majority of this comment, especially on the value of the MD. Most people will have a really hard time making the time/money of an MBA worthwhile outside of hospital admin. There are roles for MD/MBAs in industry, but people happen upon them. There is no established track, and likely the MBA won't really help you. At the very least, seek mentorship informally first. However, I disagree with the opportunity costs laid out in this post. I also disagree with the take on biotech/industry, as someone who worked in small pharma for several years prior to med school.

                                  To defray the opportunity cost, the MBA can be obtained part time after residency or as part of a residency/fellowship program during academic enrichment/research years (depending on the program). However, in these cases the best case scenario is likely a move into hospital administration. It's not like consulting firms or VC outfits are begging for MD/MBAs to join their ranks. You would have almost no advantage in the traditionally lucrative MBA tracks over fresh B-school grads.

                                  As far as biotech goes, hard disagree. I'd go as far as saying that the above paragraph is awful advice. No offense, I just want to be clear for OP and anyone reading. Your value in biotech/pharma is either preclinical R&D, clinical trials/development, medical science liaison, or a slew of business roles unrelated to medicine or biological science. The field is flooded with PhDs, even highly accomplished ones with FA papers in CNS, who can do preclinical R&D work at a high level and will work for $100-150K/year. Unless you are an MD/PhD with a specific translational skill set, it's hard to justify your worth in that sort of role. So what's left is clinical trials/development or MSL. Clinical trials and/or post-approval surveillance absolutely require residency. MSL probably won't pay as much as you want, but is a definite track if you just hate medicine.

                                  Basically any industry job worthwhile for an MD requires a residency, and OP is completely right to continue down that path, even if he/she plans to never practice another day in their life afterwards. A former surgeon turned founding partner of a mid-sized healthcare consulting firm once told me, "an MD applying here without a residency might as well have a degree in 'Medical Language.' We just don't care." Getting a "rigorous" bioengineering degree (no such thing in a field flooded with PhDs, btw) costs time and money. You'd be playing to your weaknesses and competing in a flooded market with poor credentials. You're much better off leveraging the MD, doing a residency, and joining the biotech world in a role set aside for board certified physicians.

                                  What it all comes back to is this: Trained and board certified MDs are so much more scarce and valuable in industry than MBAs. Pursue the field and if you find you need the MBA, which I think is unlikely, then pursue it. As far as getting experience, industry interfaces with academia all the time. Do a fellowship at a big academic center and find PIs who run clinical trials or consult for companies. See if you can volunteer your time or, better yet, do some consulting yourself.
                                   
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                                  a1s30

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                                    There are several factors to consider here.

                                    First, the highest probability bet for a doctor who wants to get into a top MBA is to already be admitted to the associated medical school. Naturally this isn't exactly easy, but most schools that offer both MD and MBA offer 5 year combined degree programs, and you could certainly choose to use the strength of the affiliated B-school as something of a tiebreaker should you have a choice between more than one medical school.

                                    That said, you really should reflect on exactly what value the MBA offers you. It serves several primary purposes. The first is offering access to recruiting pipelines that are nearly closed otherwise. These pipelines include the well-known tracks in finance and consulting, and also management training programs/fast-track jobs with major corps whether it's tech, pharma, industrials, or any other industry. It is FAR easier to get onto a good track such as these if you come through a recruiting pipeline. Another reason people get an MBA is to rebrand either their pedigree or their industry (mediocre undergrad-->better MBA brand-->more opportunity) or (works in widget manufacturing --->wants more money/career switch --> leaves for finance after MBA). A third reason is because it's required for professional advancement (employer won't let you progress without a graduate degree). Fourth and least significant reason, being candid, is actual learning and knowledge development. This is the least important of them because it can be had more cheaply and faster with real world experience and some dedicated reading on your own. 2 years of lost attending salary + 2 years of additional debt is a huge opportunity cost for physicians who get a full-time MBA after med school, and bluntly speaking the simple "know-how" you get from the degree is almost never worth it unless you can tap in to one of the primary purposes I mentioned above. In this scenario executive MBA is the way to go, not full-time.

                                    Unfortunately, none of these fit especially well with the career track of physicians, even those with business interests as long-term goals. To go through 4 years of med school and 3+ years of residency, just to follow this up with 2 more years of expensive school for the privilege of jumping on an entry-level career track with minimal job security and letting your actual specialized knowledge atrophy is an extremely poor bet and use of time, especially when the MD adds very little competitive value to your profile as an applicant for these roles. From a rebranding perspective, a US MD doesn't gain much additional "pedigree" from any MBA unless it's H/S/W, and even then it's of rather dubious value relative to your primary degree. Should you want to change industries, the MD is worse than useless and would be viewed as a red-flag by any prospective employer. Moving into management within your organization by virtue of getting an MBA sometimes works for MD's who want to lead hospitals/healthcare organizations, get involved in certain capacities within the healthcare industry etc, but it's more of a feather in the cap than a real prerequisite in these scenarios. I'd much rather have strong/deep networks from top-flight residency training than a weak medical CV with a shiny MBA for roles like this. For entrepreneurship, again the MBA is a feather in the cap but certainly not necessary.

                                    If you really just want to move into biotech and want some specialized knowledge, why not get a rigorous masters in bioengineering, pharmaceuticals, or some related field at a university with a good MBA program and follow that up with an MBA application? You'll save enormous amounts of time, effort, and money; arguably the time that you don't waste on clinical training you'll never use can be put towards either building a business, doing internships, or finding other ways to get far more directly applicable experience to your real goals. In any career (business, medicine, you name it) time is truly your most valuable asset, and collecting baubles without an extremely clear value-add is a practice best avoided. Climbing to true leadership roles (as opposed to mere advisor-type roles) is also much more about innate gumption, savvy, and ability to play the game than collecting credentials once you have the bare prerequisites to get in the door and be taken seriously.

                                    Thank you for the valuable input! You brought up a lot of great points that helped clarify things for me.
                                    Firstly, I did read on another forum a while back that an executive MBA doesn't yield the same experience or value as a traditional full-time MBA. I think someone else referred to it as money making scheme for business schools that want to tap into the world of working professionals that need/require an MBA for career progression, another position, etc. I'm going based off memory here but that's what I remember reading from another SDN forum. I'll definitely have to do some self directed research and see what those EMBA programs have to offer.

                                    Secondly, I definitely understand where you're coming from about the MD not offering competitive value for business roles down the line. I definitely want to find an area where I can integrate both with each other and get use of out both (if I do end up following through with my MBA plans). Leadership/management/innovation/healthcare is that intersection for me. In regards to the Masters in bioengineering or something similar, I never showed interest to those as I felt they were too technical for me. I think medical school was a lot of technical and applied learning and I wouldn't want to jump back into that for the sake of my own sanity. I think I'm more interested in gaining formal leadership and administration skills so I can actively lead and be involved in a business. Rather than just an M.D. leading a hospital or healthcare organization. It's a matter of diversifying my skillset. I'm probably not articulating that properly so I apologize if that doesn't make sense, but I hope you understand the general direction of where I'm going.
                                     
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