pencilcase

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Oct 1, 2012
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Can anyone who has been able to climb up the rungs of hospital administration as an EM doctor share some insight about the most efficient way to do this.

Does getting an MBA help?

Below is a recent article about how MDs don't get into administration. This may partly be because many docs do not want to deal with that kind of stuff. Personally, administration sounds like a job I'd be interested in doing so Im curious how to get this going. Recent EM graduate BTW. I haven't seen a lot of MDs in administration kinda like the article below explains. RNs are more active in administration and sometimes it causes strange policies to be adopted.

Can anyone in administration share how they got there. There isn't a lot in the search.

I suspect the way to get in is being active in committees and trying to be medical director. Any other useful advise?

If you are not interested in administration, feel free to bypass this thread.

Thanks.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/make-medicine-great-again-what-female-doctors-need_us_57a4cd45e4b0ccb023722eda
 

The White Coat Investor

Practicing Doc and Blogger
Partner Organization
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In my view it isn't particularly hard to do, at least on the medical staff. But medical staff positions are poorly paid and generally a coalition of the willing. If you're really interested in being in the C suite (CEO, CFO etc) you'll probably need an additional degree and a willingness to move from time to time. And sell your soul.

Consider whether you'd be happier with an administrative position in your physician group.
 

Atlas Shrugged

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More power to you. We need more physicians involved in the business and politics of medicine. Just remember where you came from.
 
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emergentmd

10+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2008
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Can anyone who has been able to climb up the rungs of hospital administration as an EM doctor share some insight about the most efficient way to do this.

Does getting an MBA help?

Below is a recent article about how MDs don't get into administration. This may partly be because many docs do not want to deal with that kind of stuff. Personally, administration sounds like a job I'd be interested in doing so Im curious how to get this going. Recent EM graduate BTW. I haven't seen a lot of MDs in administration kinda like the article below explains. RNs are more active in administration and sometimes it causes strange policies to be adopted.

Can anyone in administration share how they got there. There isn't a lot in the search.

I suspect the way to get in is being active in committees and trying to be medical director. Any other useful advise?

If you are not interested in administration, feel free to bypass this thread.

Thanks.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/make-medicine-great-again-what-female-doctors-need_us_57a4cd45e4b0ccb023722eda
If you want to be CMO, then it will take some work.

If you want to be ED director or part of the Med exec committee at a podunk or small hospital - they will beg you to do it for the most part. At big and nice hospitals, may be alittle work but for the most part, just work there for 3-5 yrs and you will get the job if you want.
 

Jlaw

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Admin fellowships are becoming bigger these days. I think most of those give you an opportunity to get your MBA as well.
 

Vandalia

5+ Year Member
Feb 21, 2014
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A few quick points as I am heading out of town:

1) "Administration" covers a wide range of situations. There isn't much in common between being the Dean of a medical school, a Vice President of HCA, or the chair of the credentials committee of a critical access hospital.

2) EM is one of the best physician specialities for administration. First, you are used to dealing with and managing a relatively large number of different people. Also, you interact with just about every specialty and every part of the hospital.

3) Don't think there is any real money in it. The amount you will make on administration is pretty good for a pediatrician. However, even a medical school dean would probably make more working the same number of hours in the ED. And for every hour that you get paid for, prepare to work 3-4 more in preparation/recovery. Yes, there is probably some corporate VP physician making $1-2M/year, BUT he is one guy out of the 100 that started in that career path to get that job. You would have better odds playing blackjack in Vegas. Also, it is not easy work. Believe me, I would rather spend 2 hours working in the ED than attending some 2 hr meeting with someone droning on over Powerpoint slides. If you don't believe me, try it for a year; you will either agree with me, or discover that you are insane.

4) I am biased, but the best preparation was the military. Now, this was in the days before 9/11 when there was actually plenty of money for CME and it was possible for them to pay for things like CPE certification (Certified Physician Executive), or what used to be the ABMM. Generally speaking, something is as valuable as the amount of effort you put into it. If someone says they can turn you into a physician executive after a weekend of watching videos from home...., well you can guess what that is worth. The best preparation is probably to attend committee meetings, ask questions, and ask people to tell you about their job. If a lawyer comes in, spend a minute or two making small talk about healthcare law, the same way with the IT guy in for back pain, etc., etc., Yes it will hurt your productivity a bit, but no gain without some pain. Listening trumps just about everything else, and you will be amazed what you pick up.

5) An MBA or a MPH? If you are interested in that stuff, then sure. It is probably overkill for most physician jobs. On the other hand, if you are university faculty, and they offer a "healthcare executive MBA" then that might be worth considering.

6) The best (read my) motivation is that I don't want to suffer from someone else's idiotic decisions. If nothing else, I have no one to blame but myself.