How to pay for your graduate studies as an internationanl student

Mar 23, 2010
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Psychology Student
Hi, I'm a new member and was wondering if anyone can give me some advices about any process or tips to pay tuition? I'm a foreigner, and I applied to some PsyD program, but the huge challenge for me will be how to pay in order to achieve my goals to be a clinical psychologist. I haven't got any answer yet about getting accepted or rejected...
Please feel free to support me and thank you in advance.:)
 

Annakei

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Erg23 are you sure you didnt start this thread under another name to flame the fires all over again? :thumbdown:
 
Mar 23, 2010
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Psychology Student
Loans.....or win the lottery
Thanks! Well, I'm still learning how education function in the US. So my questions are maybe unapropriate, but I would welcome some support.

Of course I've been thinking about getting loans. But I have read that some students get some scholarhips. Some other get assistantship. for exemple. Well I'm concern on how to avoid to repay money (as much as I can). For instance, what is the process of geting an assitantship? Who decide for that, the school or any process to apply?
 

erg923

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My most blunt suggestion would be to hold out until you can get into a ph.d program so you wouldn't have to worry about borrowing large sums of money since most ph.d program offer tuition remission and a stipend. However......

Psy.D programs sometimes offer asssitantships, usually teaching assistantships. But keep in mind that theese assitantships often pay very modestly, and/or only cut-down slightly on tuition costs. Its not going be enough to support you. Only a handful of psy.d programs (Baylor, Pepperdine, Rutgers) offer real significant financial support through assitanstships. Talk to your specific program about any oppourtunities. Other than that, apply for APA fellowships/ scholarships via their website to help out. If military service is an appealing option, explore HPSP scholarship programs offered by the US Navy, Air Force, and Army. Part-time work may be possible for the first couple year (particuarly if its a research position), but it certainly wont pay all the bills.

You are correct, you should be concern about how you will pay back masive amounts of students loans. Generally speaking, getting into 150K debt for a career that will pay you about 60k-80k per year (on average) is pretty foolish.
 
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purplebutterfly

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Generally speaking, getting into 150K debt for a career that will pay you about 60k per year (on average) is pretty foolish.
What data is this based on, exactly? The APA's 2009 salary survey does not differentiate doctoral level practitioners according to type of degree (PsyD or PhD), and the median salary for direct care practitioners in private practice ranged from $57,500 to $100,000 or more depending upon years of experience. I happen to know that doctoral level practitioners in my part of the country make easily in the six figures regardless of whether they have PsyDs or PhDs. Granted, some of them work their butts off, but when you're in private practice, your limit is the number of clients you feel you can take and still be effective.
 

erg923

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Im talking bell curve here, not indivduals.....Moreover, the OP made no mention of doing PP.

but when you're in private practice, your limit is the number of clients you feel you can take and still be effective.
The only limit? Maybe, but how long did it take to build that bottomless referal base?
 
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Therapist4Chnge

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I believe there is an international forum on SDN, which focuses on med school stuff, but I'm guessing the loans/finances side would be similar. I don't venture much over there, though it may be worth checking out.

As for financing as an international student in regard to psychology...I know people do it, though you'd be best served to find a program that will waive your tuition and provide a stipend because you may be limited in what kind of private funding and work you'll be able to complete as an international student. There are both Psy.D. and Ph.D. programs that will do this, though they all will be competitive, and you'll have to have good stats to get interviews.

ps. I changed your title so it will be more reflective of the topic, and hopefully it will attract some people with knowledge in the area. I know it is common for Canadians to come to America to study, though I'm not sure if it is any different for them, since they are America's Top Hat. :D (I kid, I kid!)