Apr 25, 2015
218
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Do program directors view "accepted publications" the same way as published? For me it's just a matter of time when the publication actually goes into press. Hopefully before sept. 15
 
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P
Apr 25, 2015
218
27
It depends.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20531151

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=publication+misrepresentation+residency

Once you see enough people lie, you tend to get suspicious of "accepted" publications.
ok thanks b/c i just started a clinical research program this summer and was able to first author a few publications and co-author a few more. They've all been accepted and I have the e-mails from the editors to confirm this but they are not in press. I guess worse comes to worse i'll just print out the manuscript, confirmation e-mail, etc. and bring them with me in the interview.
 

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It depends.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20531151

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=publication+misrepresentation+residency

Once you see enough people lie, you tend to get suspicious of "accepted" publications.
I think it kind if depends on the totality if the circumstances. If a guy already has a dozen peer reviewed publications listed in pubmed and lists a thirteenth as accepted, that is going to be regarded as legit without much inquiry. If the guy provides as one of his references/LORs a letter from his PI that mentions the research/papers, that's also going to fly. If the guy ONLY has unverifiable submitted/accepted things that i imagine is taken much more with a grain of salt. I still think the number of people who lie about publications is pretty rare, and the likelihood of an application turning on a single "accepted" paper is pretty unlikely, so most PDs don't sweat it, and just see if the guy can talk intelligently about the research on the interview day. But in general making up credentials is academic fraud and I can't imagine the benefit ever outweighs the risk.