how well has your school prepared you?

Discussion in 'Step I' started by FLmed08, Dec 21, 2005.

  1. FLmed08

    FLmed08 Junior Member
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    does anyone else wonder how well their courses have prepared them for the boards? it seems like there are a lot of concepts in the 'review' books that i have never seen before... (while a lot of random info covered in the courses is not in the review books)
     
  2. DOCTORSAIB

    DOCTORSAIB Ophtho or bust!
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    Yeah, I've noticed that also. I've been using review books since last year and there's always at least 1-2 HY topics on every exam that are either not covered in class or never asked about on exams. However, for the most part, PCOM is doing an awesome job of preparing students. Our curriculum is systems-based, well-organized, and thought by mostly department chairs and clinicial faculty of whatever system we're covering.
     
  3. gerido

    gerido Senior Member
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    Is it true that some school teach to the board while others emphasize on what they deem as important? Are there standard curriculum that all schools are suppose to follow?
     
  4. funkless

    funkless Apatheist, Anestheologist
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    Our school refuses to teach to the boards. :thumbdown:
     
  5. John Deere Gree

    John Deere Gree my tractor IS sexy!!!
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    Our's teaches what they feel is important. Which means hours upon hours of BullSh*t!!!
     
  6. gerido

    gerido Senior Member
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    If it's at all relevant, I would prefer that they teach us what they feel is important. You can study on your own for the board. If every school strictly teaches to the board, what's the point of going to a top-rated school. Or is that not a factor in education too?
     
  7. DOCTORSAIB

    DOCTORSAIB Ophtho or bust!
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    I've had this discussion with my classmates before. IMO, schools/professors should at least teach what is HY for boards and add meat to it as necessary. Sure, we're here to learn medicine, not Step 1, but I think teaching students about a particular professors research topic is a HUGE waste of time and money for 99.9% of medical students.
     
  8. imlefunny

    imlefunny New Member
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    Maybe it's a waste of time if they do, but let's be honest, very little of what we learn in the classroom is that important. The hospitals are where it's at. No matter what school you go to, third and fourth years and residents all say that the first two years are bull**** and the hospital is where the real education is. Sure, you prolly need some of the basics, but on the whole, we're all going to forget 95% of what they teach us the second we choose a field and no longer need it. That's why some schools are willing to teach to the boards. Other schools think that that's probably not the point of an education and that aiming for a competitive program/field is your choice and therefore up to you to make the sacrifices when it comes to the boards.
     
  9. Paws

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    Our school does not teach to the boards, and some courses are so filled with extraneous junk that it is really hard to sift through and say: ok, 53 pages on angina, I am thinking maybe I just need to know the basics.

    I feel like we are also just left to ourselves on this. I am glad to have sdn because if I didn't I would be way scr^^ed.
     
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  10. quideam

    quideam Too tired to complain
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    Same thing with my school... i basically just do boards studying parallel with my classes, but in the end i put the boards material first. I just don't care to memorize the 53 pages on angina :p
     
  11. SCSlug

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    Hi, I am just entering medical school this fall. I am wanting to make sure I do not loose track of the board exam material during my first to years. What materials do you use to make sure that you are keeping up with Board material while going through M1 and M2?
     
  12. DOctorJay

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    basically use the review books while you study for each class/topic. the review books help you to find the high yield info and help you build your basic knowledge, then delve into the stuff (notes, texts, etc.) your particular school actually wants you to know for their exams.

    -J
     
  13. chintu

    chintu Senior Member
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    My school does the same way for the most part. There is a lot of detailed info. taught by specific teachers on a very basic topic just because it is their interest and think its important for us to know. As much as I've tried to study the board prep materials on the side, I have been very much constrained for time...as it is there's not enough time to study the class material, when I try to squeeze in the boards prep material I've done poorly on the class tests. However, in the end I feel like the board review really hammers the high points to take from each class that I might remember long term....whereas, I know I am going to forget what's taught in the class for the most part. I think in the end its a personal decision; if you really want honors in a class then its imp. to just focus on the class material, if you want to do well on the boards not worrying about performance in indiv. classes then usmle review material is useful to do.
     
  14. ocean11

    ocean11 Senior Member
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    I go to RFUMS/CMS and it prepares you REALLY well for boards. Most of the kids here score well and we have an above average score for USMLE 1. I know a few people that scored in the 250's last year and heard of someone a few yrs ago of scoring in the high 260's... anyhow...

    Good luck all :)
     
  15. quepatho

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    Bump bump bump. I wanted to know the same thing as this OP. The question will never get old ;).
     
  16. SlaveOfTCMC

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    My school wants all of us students to become primary care physicians and get locked into Northeast Pennsylvania.

    They teach us the very very easy questions covered by Boards, but don't bother to expand our minds and teach concepts.


    https://www.aamc.org/newsroom/reporter/march10/45548/primary_care_in_medical_education.html


    Oh well. I don't have too big a problem with this. After all, I am from the area and I intend to stay here and pursue General Surgery.
     
  17. reedman

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    after doing 3 NBME exams, i think my school did a half assed job of prepping us for step 1. sure, they threw in a few of the details during our course work. however, i felt completely bogged down with clinically irrelevant material during firsts year, and much too specialised information this year (during renal we they were trying to teach us to be renal pathologists, not doctors that understand renal pathology). some of the other stuff this year was actually TOO clinically relevant (but great for 3rd year).

    but i have had no problem whatsoever assimilating first aid. i guess i learned the basic concepts in school, so filling the gaps is not too hard.

    my school makes a mediocre effort to teach to the boards. overall, i think the education is excellent, but we need good board scores to match into those fancy specialities they are teaching us about.
     
  18. jfgavina

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    When I don't understand something on FA I just grab my goljan.
     
  19. SlaveOfTCMC

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    Yep I feel the same way in my school.

    However, it totally makes sense. Any school, if it tried hard enough, could teach us enough to do very well on Boards and simultaneously also prepare us for clinical very well.

    It's not a matter of time constraint, but rather what content they choose to put in there and how well they care to explain it to us.

    Rather, this country does need primary care physicians... so they simply set this up to get the gunners to the top and the uninformed to primary care....
     
  20. quepatho

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    Do you go to school in the state of Florida? :p
     
  21. ArcGurren

    ArcGurren only one will survive
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    Eh, I dunno. My school is also big on pushing people into primary care. However what happens is that a ton of people match into medicine, and then a lot of those people end up subspecializing. There's usually like 1 person who matches into Family Medicine (either they've wanted to from the start or they did REALLY poorly) and a fair number of people who match into pediatrics (5-10 and they all really wanted to). Nearly everyone else matches into their specialty of choice despite the school's purported "goal" of encouraging primary care. It's more politics than actual results.

    They also do not teach to the boards, but as seems to be the case for most schools... most places don't teach to the boards, period. Our second year classes did drop a lot of gems and pearls regarding certain highly tested boards facts but there was also a lot of extraneous crap that we learned which would not be step 1 relevant (like the movements of labor, how to measure gestational age, etc - stuff that would be relevant on an OB rotation but not here). We even had an entire lecture about organ transplantation - the only thing of which you need to know for step 1 is the different kinds of rejections, who cares about how you perform a Whipple's.*

    *(I get that many people do find this cool, don't hate on me)

    In the end though, I feel if you learn the basic path, read Robbins (I did make it through many of the chapters) during second year, and also listen to the Goljan path lectures along with it, you'll be feeling much better come step 1 time.
     
  22. MtHoodWood

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    ouch. still a few small minds out there i see.
     
  23. SlaveOfTCMC

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    Are you mad at this statement?


    I'm not trying to antagonize anyone. This is what the faculty and the medical system hopes to do.

    Reality may be different to an extent, but if you think any lazy, "still think she/he is in college" Ms/Mr. Buzzword, goes on vacation frequently, crams First Aid last minute, "already thinking about what luxury cars to drive" student is going to become a successful dermatologist or vascular surgeon... maybe you need to expand your mind a little?
     
  24. MtHoodWood

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    I am not sure I understand... the "faculty and medical system" are conspiring to ensure our medical schools purposefully cover less content than what is tested on the boards? This leaves extra content out there for those who want to go above and beyond and get a better score to become a dermatologist or vascular surgeon? And the PCP docs just have not caught on yet? Or are unwilling to put in the extra work studying? Is that the difference between PCP's and dermatologists? I thought the derms were the brilliant ones in school who also had a special talent for treating acne.
    I would like to think some schools are more interested in training good docs who will do fine on the boards, not simply churning out board-slayers.
     
  25. todds

    todds Member
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    My school prepared us horribly for the boards and I think horribly in general.

    The lecturers over and over again forgot the fact that they were teaching 1st/2nd year medical students. Before you throw all the detailed data about management and algorithms of care, you need to teach us pathophysiology. We need to understand WHY... which of course most of the professors never did.

    It was amusing actually how horrible it was. They got PharmDs to teach us pharm, and I think they just used the same slides as they would for pharmacy students - they wanted us to read on drug dosages, how often to give it and extraordinary specific info - everyone like is WTF we don't even know HOW the drug works and now you want us to memorizing dosage?

    Medical schools NEED to get away from the idea that a professor doing research on a topic is fit to give a lecture on this topic. Just because someone is a good researchers and knows a lot of specifics doesn't mean they know how to teach.

    I envy schools like Oklahoma state who have one pathology teacher throughout to get them through everything. If we had one good person teaching us everything, i probably wouldve actually gone to class
     
  26. todds

    todds Member
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    But the problem is many schools do neither. In order to prepare for clinics and boards you need a solid understanding of the why and how of pathophysiology. This is also the case for boards. I can understand not going out of their way to cover everything, but many schools do a piss poor job of the basics.

    Or some schools spend a ton of time on stuff that doesnt matter and quickly rush through stuff that does matter. My school spent and entire month on a Nutrition course. We spend 1 week and 2 days on Gastrointestinal Pathology. We spent 3 months on biochemistry in MS-1. We spent 2 weeks covering BOTH Endocrine and Reproductive Pathology. This is just pure stupidity. Now because of it, a bunch of people have to spend more time learning this stuff on their own to understand it properly.

    Also for example, I went to a school that simply didn't cover Eye Pathology - meaning we did not learn about glaucoma, we did not learn about retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy - not one single lecture. But we had a ton of hours spent on molecular genetics of viruses and excessively detailed biochemistry classes. THis makes no sense why the school would do this and leave out an entire organ to be covered on your own - its not that the school is not interested in making good doctors, its that despite them trying, they suck at it.
     
  27. quepatho

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    This is just so quotable, so true. Likewise, we got no anatomy of the foot. On the up side, I did not see any foot anatomy on my particular step 1 version.

    I hope you don't see any eye stuff on your step 1 exam :p
     

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