Quantcast

Huge humanities/social sciences requirements- please clarify?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

premed3445

Full Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
73
Reaction score
4

Members don't see this ad.
Hi all,

I'm a sophomore (becoming a junior next year) student who is majoring in biomedical engineering.

What I've noticed is that some medical schools like USC Keck, Harvard, Emory, Johns Hopkins, etc have large course requirements in the humanities and social sciences.

For example, Harvard asks that you take 16 semester hours (not quarter-hours) in literature, the languages, the arts, humanities and social sciences. Emory asks for 18, and Johns Hopkins asks for 24. USC asks for a whopping 30 hours.

The main problem is that my biomedical engineering curriculum leaves little room for that many courses. Yes, I have my English requirements already done (which are made distinct from the humanities and social sciences), and yes, I've taken around 6 semester hours already for humanities. I also have lots of AP credits (left over from high school) that can cover most of the requirements.

I have heard that USC allows engineering courses (can anybody confirm this for me? I'm going to send e-mails soon) to cover the 30-semester hour requirement, but in cases where medical schools don't allow me to, I'm not exactly sure what to do.

Any discussion is appreciated.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2009
Messages
16,197
Reaction score
5,913
AP credits cover the requirement.. what's the problem? More than likely you'll need at the very least 30 credits in the humanities for general education requirements at most places so you'll probably need to take some of those courses regardless. If not you can easily take a few online summer courses in the humanities.
 

Astarael

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2010
Messages
2,198
Reaction score
19
It might seem like a lot of credits, but if you take humanities classes to fill up any semester that you are under-enrolled for, it adds up quickly. My guess is that even with a restrictive schedule from your biomed engineering major, you will have enough humanities credits to cover all but the most stringent requirements. At this point, it's only a couple schools in the entire country that require that many humanities credits.
 

Whatyousay

A few loose screws
10+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
5,804
Reaction score
62
Think of humanities courses as a way of taking interesting classes that you might otherwise not have the opportunity to take outside of your major.

I can usually fit in 3-6 credit hours of humanities a semester on top of my engineering classes. These courses generally should be much easier than your engineering courses, so as long as you stay on top of your homework/studying, it shouldn't be too bad.
 

the duck

Full Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
884
Reaction score
3
Humanity, and social sciences classes will be a lot easier than your engineering courses, so it shouldn't be too hard to squeeze the few you still need to take in. Its really just medical schools way of getting well rounded people. As a non-sciences major, this requirement is automatically met, but I gotta struggle to fit in all the sciences, so I can feel your pain.:)
 

Espadaleader

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 28, 2010
Messages
1,434
Reaction score
812
Things are changing. The AAMC is explicitly placing the social sciences, ethics and general philosophy in its MCAT curriculum. A full-blown biomedical curriculum may be obsolete...well after 2015. As for now you are fine. I hope.
 

Big Dog

Full Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Messages
155
Reaction score
0
don't apply to those med schools! They are clearly indicating their preferences of a more balanced undergraduate education. Yes, engineering has a very full courseload of math/science/eng courses, leaving little space for electives. But that is your choice of major. Certain med schools are not high such a choice. Apply elsewhere.

but in cases where medical schools don't allow me to, I'm not exactly sure what to do.
 
Top