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Human Cell Cloning

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by NE_Cornhusker1, Nov 25, 2001.

  1. NE_Cornhusker1

    NE_Cornhusker1 12" Member
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    Advanced Cell Technologies out of Massachusets has cloned human cells. Here's the release:
    <a href="http://dailynews.yahoo.com/fc/Science/Cloning" target="_blank">http://dailynews.yahoo.com/fc/Science/Cloning</a>

    What do you guys and gals think? Good/ Bad. Indifferent? Give your opinions but respect everyone's point of view.

    Personally, I think this holds great promise in treating diseases but we must be careful to avoid in all but the most neccesary cases where all other alternatives would fail to sustain a reasonable quality of life.
     
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  3. none

    none 1K Member
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    Pretty indifferent. It's not like everyone wasn't expecting it. I'm mildly surprised at how long the development of this tech is taking and that the first people to do it weren't interested in implantation (which is much more immediately profitable than some sort of magical future organ replacement).
     
  4. SMW

    SMW Grand Member
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    Indifferent. The experiement was pretty much a failure i.e. they didn't get to a big enough number of cells to be able to extract the stem cells they were hoping for. Interesting, because one of the methods they were using involved parthenogenesis, which might get around some peoples' ethical objections to this type of stem cell harvesting. I agree that the technology holds great promise. For a good news report on the experiment, see this <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2001/11/26/national/26CLON.html" target="_blank">New York Times article.</a>
     
  5. Tweetie_bird

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    I am SO HAPPY that somebody mentioned this, I've been wanting to talk about it too.

    I feel indifferent for now, optimistic for the future.

    As already mentioned, the experiment didn't really have the kind of eye-opening results we want to see in medicine. From what I heard, the cells didn't even get to the 8 cell stage. I can see why certain people are becoming wary of this technology...the sound of "human embryo farms" doesn't sound appealing to a raving scientist like me. However, we are forgetting about the intent of this experiment--which is NOT just to clone human embryos....it is to provide people that are ALREADY LIVING, with another form of therapy (given, it's an expensive one!) The problem of cloning to have another separate HUMAN is an issue alltogether different from this one.

    With the current rise in the geriatric population, end stage diseases are becoming more and more prevalent. Studies have shown that a lot of diseases in the elderly are "tied in" together--eg, people with diabetes are approx 20 times more prone to having MI's (I got this from a Diabetic journal, don't have references right now). It is apparent that eliminating causes of one disease, may aleast curb the effects of another one. The point is--that the techonlogy exists (given, it needs to be replicated and perfected yet)! Who are we to try and stop ailing people from having the rights to a certain therapeutic? I ask myself the same question when I consider artificial reproductive therapies--if the adults are consenting, and the technology ALREADY EXISTS, who are we to stop them from having the gift of LIFE?

    Isn't that what it comes down to? The gift of life? You may have already guessed that in my opinion, conception is not the start of human life. The choice in front of me is simple--helping an already living person who is sick, with technologies that could potentially cure him of the disease, versus, saving a human embryo in a dish for months knowing that it may not even develop into a full fledged human being. Again, the choice is simple--letting a person already living have every therpeutic available to him/her to sustain it, versus, saving the "rights" of human embryos that only have the POTENTIAL TO LIVE, but not a LIFE (yet). In my eyes, the right to LIVE, over rides any other right including the right to "potentially live."

    But that's just my humble opinion. Thanks for letting me put it out there.

    I'd like to see a different opinion, if there are any out there.

    Tweetie
     
  6. Mossjoh

    Mossjoh Mayo Clinic-PGY2
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    I'm pretty upset about them trying to say that the embryo is not yet human and that it is just a pre-human cluster of cells, as described by the labratory's president this morning on the talk shows.
    It seems to me that this "cluster of cells" is indeed humans. Does it not have 46 human chromosomes? If implanted, would it not develop into a human being?
    The one thing this "cluster of cells" is lacking to become human is a uterus to implant into and develop. Where can we draw the line?
     
  7. Jamier2

    Jamier2 SDN Hillbilly Moderator
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    This discussion is unrelated to applying to medical school, so it's headed to the Everyone forum.
     

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