dabears405

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Sep 20, 2015
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New to the site here. I am a really bad interviewer, I have a 'shy personality', don't have the greatest of confidence, stutter a lot, and can't express myself fully during an interview (overall not a well spoken person). I have read all the interview tips out there for an interview and watched a lot of medical school interview tips, but am unable to apply the tips when interviewing because of mental blocks. I also try practicing in front of the mirror. What is the most effective way in improving your interview skills for those of you that have a similar personality as me?
 

mathnerd88

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New to the site here. I am a really bad interviewer, I have a 'shy personality', don't have the greatest of confidence, stutter a lot, and can't express myself fully during an interview (overall not a well spoken person). I have read all the interview tips out there for an interview and watched a lot of medical school interview tips, but am unable to apply the tips when interviewing because of mental blocks. I also try practicing in front of the mirror. What is the most effective way in improving your interview skills for those of you that have a similar personality as me?
You can imagine the interviewer as one of your peers, not someone higher than you that you feel shy with. You need to talk to your interviewer as having an intellectual conversation with your friends.
 
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New to the site here. I am a really bad interviewer, I have a 'shy personality', don't have the greatest of confidence, stutter a lot, and can't express myself fully during an interview (overall not a well spoken person). I have read all the interview tips out there for an interview and watched a lot of medical school interview tips, but am unable to apply the tips when interviewing because of mental blocks. I also try practicing in front of the mirror. What is the most effective way in improving your interview skills for those of you that have a similar personality as me?
Probably go to your school and ask them if they can help, also DO school interviews in my experience are nothing like MD school interviews.
 

mathnerd88

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Probably go to your school and ask them if they can help, also DO school interviews in my experience are nothing like MD school interviews.
In my experience, they are very similar. My friends who are in MD interviews got more or less the same questions as my DO school interviews.

I believe it just really depends on the school/interviewer.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Probably go to your school and ask them if they can help, also DO school interviews in my experience are nothing like MD school interviews.
I think more and more MD schools aren't doing the whole multiple people counsel interview thing anymore.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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My recommendation is to know yourself, your PS, the highlights of your undergraduate experience academically and in terms of volunteering. Always be able to understand what drives you, what makes you you, and why you believe that you would make a good doctor. If you can memorize these answers or be able to recall them then you can turn any interview into your bitch.
 
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I think more and more MD schools aren't doing the whole multiple people counsel interview thing anymore.
That is not what I am getting at, MD schools grill you a lot more, they ask some very difficult questions, they look for more reasons to not take you. DO school interviews are very relaxed in comparison, I have been through the process at both. Its also harder to get an interview at an MD school, I got two invites at MD, and 9 at DO.
 
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I used to be a pretty shy person, but after making a conscious effort to change that, I am now rather outgoing. The best advice I have is to just work on small talking with people. Start up conversations with random people on the bus or waiting for class to start. It's really hard, and can be super uncomfortable sometimes, but if you are serious about medicine, you are gonna have to learn to talk to people at some point. The stronger your ability to talk with people is, the more confident you will become. If you can talk to a stranger for 5 minutes where literally anything could happen, you should be able to tackle an interview that you already know a good portion of the questions that will be asked!
 

oOKawaiiOo

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I used to be a pretty shy person, but after making a conscious effort to change that, I am now rather outgoing. The best advice I have is to just work on small talking with people. Start up conversations with random people on the bus or waiting for class to start. It's really hard, and can be super uncomfortable sometimes, but if you are serious about medicine, you are gonna have to learn to talk to people at some point. The stronger your ability to talk with people is, the more confident you will become. If you can talk to a stranger for 5 minutes where literally anything could happen, you should be able to tackle an interview that you already know a good portion of the questions that will be asked!
+1 I went to the Pre-SOMA at Marian University, MUCOM. The pre-med students had a chance to meet and talk with the current students. They were extremely helpful, at the very least.

I am very bad at interviewing too, or at least I think I am. I stutter too from a combination of talking WAY too fast and being nervous. I dont stutter as much because I slowed my pace and gained more confidence from it. However, I'm really confident and outgoing. I usually talk to strangers about anything really. It could be at a library, coffee shop, or shopping at the mall. If you really want to be a great doctor, you will go the extra mile and make it work. Goodluck to you!! Dont give up your dreams!
 

Monkitty

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Practice. Practice. Practice. (and then practice some more)

See if your college/university (if still attending) can do mock interviews. Use those until they are sick of you. Doesn't even have to be for med school. Go to any (mock) interview you can and practice.

While it might be too late for interview prep, I full agree with @oOKawaiiOo thoughts. Get out there and talk to people! Join a book club, improv group, volunteer to be a campus guide, or English conversation partner. Anything that will get you out there and talking.

This might be a bit out there, but maybe go ask your English/Communications department if they have any resources you can use. Maybe you can sit in on a speech class and see some good examples. Maybe even hit up a few English/Communications professors and just chat with them for advice. Double benefit of learning something useful and practicing conversing at the same time.

Also, see if you can videotape yourself during an "interview". Whether it is a mock one with your career center or just at home with friends/the mirror. Being able to see what you are ACTUALLY doing (not just relying on memory) is vital to improving.

Good luck!
 

AnatomyGrey12

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As all above posters have said, just practice. Your school should be able to help you set up mock interviews. Interviewing is a lot of practice, like a lot of things
 
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dabears405

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Sep 20, 2015
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Unfortunately, I've graduated from undergrad already. But, I'll try to set up some mock interviews from centers from around my area. I have a few interviews coming up so I hope these mock interviews help.
 

twospadz

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Im at an MD school but I was exactly like you. The key to acing your interviews is to turn them into an conversation. If you can get your interviewer to talk as much as you or even a little bit more, you've done really well. It can be any subject. THIS IS THE KEY. Ask them questions about life in general. Never try to talk about specific stuff like sports. Always try to turn the question or subject back on them so they can become even more interested. Trust me this is the method that will get you accepted.
 

Monkitty

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Im at an MD school but I was exactly like you. The key to acing your interviews is to turn them into an conversation. If you can get your interviewer to talk as much as you or even a little bit more, you've done really well. It can be any subject. THIS IS THE KEY. Ask them questions about life in general. Never try to talk about specific stuff like sports. Always try to turn the question or subject back on them so they can become even more interested. Trust me this is the method that will get you accepted.
I'm not sure I would recommend this. I could see it coming off as snotty and overbearing. Feel it out. If the interview seems warm to you and receptive to the idea of it being a more natural back-and-forth, then go for it. But some interviewers just want to ask their questions, get their answers and be done with it. Trying to strike up a conversation in such a situation could do more harm than good (you use up your time and they don't get to all their questions).

Communication is like dancing; you have to follow your partners lead. In the case of the interviews, I'd say the safest plan is to follow you're interviewers lead. If they are trying to be conversational, then converse. If they want to keep it business-like and formal, then follow step. One of the worst things you can do is move to one tempo when your partner is at another. In the end, THEY are leading, so follow their steps.
 
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mathnerd88

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I'm not sure I would recommend this. I could see it coming off as snotty and overbearing. Feel it out. If the interview seems warm to you and receptive to the idea of it being a more natural back-and-forth, then go for it. But some interviewers just want to ask their questions, get their answers and be done with it. Trying to strike up a conversation in such a situation could do more harm than good (you use up your time and they don't get to all their questions).

Communication is like dancing; you have to follow your partners lead. In the case of the interviews, I'd say the safest plan is to follow you're interviewers lead. If they are trying to be conversational, then converse. If they want to keep it business-like and formal, then follow step. One of the worst things you can do is move to one tempo when your partner is at another. In the end, THEY are leading, so follow their steps.
This is especially true. You need to gauge what kind of person your interviewer is. You don't want to speak too much, or speak too little. You need to figure out his tempo and follow his lead.
 

Goro

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Having read the interview feedback section in this website extensively, I have to disagree. It seems like MD schools are MORE likely to ask you the typical questions, and DO schools are more liley to grill you like a steak. Naturally, each school will have their own take.

OP, go to your school's career center and they should help prepare you for interviewing.

Check out YouTube videos on interviewing. there are some that are absolutely cringe-worthy, so you learn what NOT to do, at least.

Get some acquaintances to interview you. You can supply them with a bank of interview questions so you won't know what's coming.

read the Interview feedback section of these forums.

Talk to your doctor if you're really nervous, or at least see your school's counselor.



That is not what I am getting at, MD schools grill you a lot more, they ask some very difficult questions, they look for more reasons to not take you. DO school interviews are very relaxed in comparison, I have been through the process at both. Its also harder to get an interview at an MD school, I got two invites at MD, and 9 at DO.
 

TUVIX

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New to the site here. I am a really bad interviewer, I have a 'shy personality', don't have the greatest of confidence, stutter a lot, and can't express myself fully during an interview (overall not a well spoken person). I have read all the interview tips out there for an interview and watched a lot of medical school interview tips, but am unable to apply the tips when interviewing because of mental blocks. I also try practicing in front of the mirror. What is the most effective way in improving your interview skills for those of you that have a similar personality as me?
Do you have much clinical experience working directly with patients?
 
Oct 8, 2013
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Probably go to your school and ask them if they can help, also DO school interviews in my experience are nothing like MD school interviews.

How do DO and MD interviews differ, can you expand on that Seth?