I did bad in highschool . does that eliminate my chances of being a medical doctor

Discussion in 'hSDN' started by Midnight786, 05.14.14.

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  1. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    Hi ...I'm a highschool student and I just wanted to ask that is it still possible for me to become a doctor. Its a career I know I will do well in and I find it the most fascinating above all fields. I had a 3.0 in highschool took all honors and AP courses in my senior year had a 21 on the ACT. Based upon these performances I feel I should just give up the field I wish to pursue. I want to let you know I honestly never cared about highschool grades and just did enough to get by. I've decided now to get serious in my undergrad and I've also applied to hospitals for volunteer hours and I also am taking course on becoming a paramedic so that I may get experience in the medical field. But I still wanted to ask based upon my highschool performance should I just give up on that dream? Do u guys know anyone who's done bad in highschool , good in college, now a medical doctor? Any tips? Comments? I'd like some feed backs please. Thank you
     
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  3. Mad Jack

    Mad Jack Critically Caring Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I never cared about high school. Got Cs and Ds left and right, never did my homework, etc. I eventually got sick of it and just dropped out entirely. After working retail, fast food, janitorial work, etc. I realized how awful life was without a good college education. I got my GED, went to CC, did extremely well, then transferred to a university and graduated from there with a 4.0. I start medical school this fall. If a dropout like me can do it, you certainly can. Just work hard, study as if your life depends on it (because truthfully, your future does), and don't ever get behind.

    When it comes to medical school, what happened in high school is meaningless. You've been given a chance to remake yourself, so ho out there and make the best of it.
     
  4. mct2762

    mct2762 Banned Banned Account on Hold 2+ Year Member

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    high school has absolutely no bearing on whether or not you will get in to med school. Just do well in college
     
  5. Arayh

    Arayh MS3 2+ Year Member

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    High school has no bearing on your acceptance to medical school. Just make sure your grades, MCAT and extracurriculars are strong in undergrad.
     
  6. Stubbornly Pre-Med

    Stubbornly Pre-Med

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    I am not a medical student but my pre-med has been pretty smooth sailing thus far. I failed Algebra in high school, got more Cs than anything else and a few Ds in non-honors classes. I struggled for a 2.9. I did not care because I was leaving for art school not college. A year into that I decided I wanted to be a doctor. I had no background in biology or chemistry. It is more of a struggle at first but if you are determind and committed you can do anything! I had a recent slip up with grades but that is not because of what I had done in high school, it was a current lack of commitment. But if someone like me can get an almost B+ in organic chem 2, you certainly could get an A.
     
  7. The Buff OP

    The Buff OP 2+ Year Member

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    F*** yeah it is still possible! I come from a rough background. In HS I was a troublemaker and I barely graduated HS. It matters what grades you will get in your UG studies, MCAT, PS, and Ec's.
     
  8. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    Thank you all .... I guess I was having some depressing emotional times . I know now that all I have to do is put my mind to it. Once again I thank you all and I hope and pray you All get to whatever goals you have visioned for yourself . once again thank you :):)
     
  9. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 2+ Year Member

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    let high school past be the past....just get your grades from now and go be a Dr
     
  10. CherryRedDracul

    CherryRedDracul 2 Chainz Muscular Dystrophy 2+ Year Member

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    There's a guy one year below me--I'm an MS3--who had a 0.7 GPA in high school and dropped out. He then got his GED, went to college, and now he just finished his first year in medical school a few weeks ago. There's also a medical director of a hospital ED I know of who had a 2.7 GPA in high school and was setting himself up for a career in baseball until he got injured in college. He hauled ass in his undergrad studies and got into to med school. It's not the end of the road for you.
     
    Last edited: 06.08.14
  11. styphon

    styphon Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Highschool doesn't mean anything for med school - literally no one cares, there were people in my med school who had GEDs. I also struggled in highschool (teenage issues), took a couple years off to "find myself", and now I am a family medicine attending.

    Make sure you are ready for college though - it will be harder. There will be no one guiding/pushing you, lots of learning/studying in college is "self motivated".
     
  12. CajunMedic

    CajunMedic 7+ Year Member

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    Not at all. I graduated 99th out of a class of 103 with a a 1.3 GPA. Failed out of college my first try. Once I made the decision to go back and finish, I buckled down and did well in undergrad. I've been a Paramedic for 12 years- you can PM me if you want any info and insight into the job.
     
  13. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    I didn't know you could even graduate with a 1.3!
     
  14. johnston9234

    johnston9234

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    high school doesnt matter at all to adcoms
     
  15. Planes2Doc

    Planes2Doc 2+ Year Member

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    Once you finish high school and move on to college, no one will ever ask for your high school transcripts unless you're transferring schools. Speaking of transferring, I knew someone who did very poorly in my high school. He failed a bunch of classes. He ended up going to community college and then turned his grades around. He transferred to the University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign and now does well. Anyone can turn their lives around. College is a fresh start. If you ended up going to a school you hate because of your bad high school grades, then use this to motivate you so you can transfer to a better school! It's possible to go from community college to the Ivies. Anything is possible as long as you work hard.
     
  16. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    i cant thank you all as much as i want to... i do see myself now where i stand... if there is a will there is a way... i swear i will work hard cause there is a vision i see, a goal i wish to achieve and i wont back down. i guess highschool was a wake up call for me in which i now know what not to do.....
    once again i will stand strong amongst you and work hard to achieve my goal.

    i also ask what are the greatest factors in favors of getting into medical school.?
     
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  17. Mycoalwin

    Mycoalwin 2+ Year Member

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    Pretty much what everyone has said my friend. Keep going at it. Do well at whatever university you decide to go to (whether it be CC first, then transfer, or whatever). If you do well there, then your chances for medical school are just as good as everyone else's.
     
  18. Genore

    Genore 2+ Year Member

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    The only thing I would be worried about is your ability to take standardized tests. You'll want to get in the 80th percentile (in a test that a larger portion of people care about than the ACT) to get into a decent MD program. However, if you're an URM and are OK with a DO program, a 55th percentile (like your ACT) might be fine.
    However, as others have said, your high school time is behind you. You shouldn't have a problem turning things around if you really work hard. You may not be able to make it into a top 10 (it can take time to figure out the best ways to study), but if your grades are good and your MCAT is decent, you can become a doctor.
     
  19. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan 7+ Year Member

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    The mcat & sat/act are vastly different types of tests. The skills it takes to get a solid score on the SAT or ACT are borderline inapplicable to the mcat.

    A 55th percentile will get you into a DO school as an ORM pending a decent score, exposure to osteopathic medicine, and if you're not relatively picky.

    A 55th percentile as a URM will get you into MD programs.
     
  20. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    oh i see. so i understand that gpa is a must in doing pretty well in but now i'm a bit concerned about standardized test.... how should one do well in test such as the mcat? i assume that its just composed of a majority of critical thinking and a lot of practice. what do you guys recommend i do? should i start devoting my time to the mcat along with prepping up for it early ???
     
  21. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan 7+ Year Member

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    You study in college not to pass or get an A. You study to learn the material intimately.

    The way to do well on the Mcat is fundamentally possess a strong background in the material.

    The Mcat is 50% background and 50% know how to answer the question types.
     
  22. Genore

    Genore 2+ Year Member

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    You're right, I should have said "URM *OR* OK with a DO school." However, I wouldn't say that they ACT and MCAT are "vastly different." That 50% of knowing how to answer the questions uses the very same skills used to do well on the ACT. I found the verbal very similar to the ACT (harder on the MCAT, yes, but not different in the concepts tested by the questions). The other areas were different but both still test your critical thinking, pattern recognition, unflappability, and ability to solve problems quickly.

    I got a 35 (super score 36; 35 in verbal, btw) on the ACT, and I know I didn't do quite that well on the MCAT (percentage-wise, though we'll find out tomorrow for sure), but the principles behind each test aren't wholly dissimilar.
     
  23. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    I think the skills needed for the SAT and ACT are highly applicable to the MCAT. I did very well on all 3 for the same reasons.
     
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  24. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan 7+ Year Member

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    I never took the ACT, so I'm in the wrong I suppose for trying to draw generalizations in regards to its relation to the SAT. Now, regarding the SAT, I felt that the SAT verbal was a lot more identify where something doesn't line up with the sentence itself as opposed to integrate information in the passage to do that. I felt personally that the mcat passages in verbal were much more well designed.

    I mean personally I think the Mcat & the SAT are both deeply flawed* tests by virtue of the fact that at least in my perspective they aren't predictive in their use and seem to entirely be used as a status symbol. I.e why enroll a kid with a 27 v.s a 35, they both have the same board pass rate.


    Obviously the SAT is a significantly more flawed test because it does not predict anything anymore. The Mcat is better as it can predict whether someone will struggle within medical school, the numbers however are much lower than one would imagine.



    ANYWAY, I think we're getting ahead of ourselves now. This kid may not even want to be a doctor by the end of bio 1 when he realizes that metabolism bores the hell out of him.
     
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  25. Genore

    Genore 2+ Year Member

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    Yeah, the SAT was...yuck. Took that in 7th grade. You forget that it accurately predicts wealth! (As in, you can predict a kid's parents income reasonably well when controlling for other variables. My econometrics showed that it was weakly negative, though significantly, associated with perceived job satisfaction, which I found interesting.)

    These tests also correlate pretty well with intelligence, which tends to lead to more successful people (at least in the mid regions...less so in the high regions).

    Very true. Midnight786, you may not want to become a doctor when you get to school. That is perfectly OK. Let me say it again because others won't: It's perfectly OK to change your mind. You'll make more money in other fields and there are many other ways to benefit society ("help people").

    As for starting your MCAT prep, do well in your classes. Learn lots. Take tough courses in the sciences. That will help you more than running through flash cards freshman year when you don't know arginine from glycine. Start after Sophomore when you can reasonably have learned all the information. Study that summer and throughout junior year. Take the test earlier rather than later, but only when you're ready and not supper rushed (finals week isn't worth it). Good luck with everything!
     
  26. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan 7+ Year Member

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    Actually the premise of it predicting intelligence has been entirely rejected, and I think it was rejected nearly in the early to mid 2000s. And it's not surprising that it to some degree correlates wealth, though again this has problematic implications without sincere mention of distribution and skewness, i.e does the correlation have a R = 1 between 100-1500 and then tapper off into a R = .1 the next half? Essentially you've got a moderate correlation, but that correlation largely is useless and inapplicable.

    And as you mentioned, the biggest thing is to attend your classes with a genuine desire to understand the material. If you understand it, then the mcat becomes a whole lot easier. My advice however is to not rush the test, you need to realize that even if you have a hell of a mcat score without any defining characteristics on your application you're going to be a bland applicant. Don't be afraid of a gap year and take your time to maximize your scores as well as improve aspects of your application that take time, such as work at research companies or America Teach etc.
     
  27. Genore

    Genore 2+ Year Member

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    ;) Which is why I said correlates with and not predicts. Once you control for other factors, it looses predictive power.
    My tests were controlled for skewness, thank you. :p I think we took the log of parental wealth and it gave us a normal enough (according to the skewness numbers) distribution. But yeah, it's hard to have any accurate predictor on the edges (there are some really smart poor kids but most seem "dumb" and there are some rich kids with developmental disabilities but most appear "smart" on these tests). But for those in the middle class, it's reasonable enough to be worth discussing.
     
  28. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan 7+ Year Member

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    Lol, that's what a correlation inherently is though, a predictive statistic. But yah, as you mentioned it loses any means to predict anything.

    I don't think that necessarily producing a logarithmic curve controls for skewness. It mostly kinda is what statisticians try to use when they aren't keen on 2-waying something and finding out their formerly significant data is no longer significant.

    But anywho, the point is that most people are surprised that the SAT continues to be used however.
     
  29. Genore

    Genore 2+ Year Member

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    Correlations are between two variables. I meant prediction in the more rigorous, controlling for other variables, sense, but I suppose you are correct in the general sense.

    Transformations are how you typically deal with skewness. In wealth (of a country or person) or income, taking the 10 or 2 log is a good option, but there are mathematical transformations.

    True. As with the MCAT, it seems to be just a way to make people jump through hoops. Hoops are a reasonably effective way of weeding out people who "don't want it enough," though you tend to throw out a number of talented individuals who are in unfortunate circumstances as a result. Alas, the silly tests will probably be around for the foreseeable future.
     
  30. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    rather interesting. ive come to understand that the sat and the act are test that do not accurately measure intelligence. however ive already made up my mind about being a physician. i intend to make it all the way to med school with a desire to learn. and let me get this right, the best way to do good on the mcat is to learn the material in every science course that i take and be able to utilize that material. i am very concerned about the mcat because of my terrible ability of taking test. though i may do well in classes upon research and assignments that overall stabilize my grades, i struggle with test in general. do not tell me that med school is not my field of interest cause i choose to pursue this path despite the challenges i face. i know i must build my applications with not just a good gpa and mcat score but others factors as well. the main point i wish to ask is what can i do right now when i go straight into college in regards of making sure i do well on the mcat despite my poor test taking results. i understand that there are other fields that i can go into that i can acquire more money and help people but however will i be happy in that field. i do not plan on slacking of like i did in highschool for i am determined to work hard and ascend. with that i ask help and guidance from you who can offer it.
     
  31. superpom_7

    superpom_7 Casually waiting for January 29th..

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    What/how you did in High School does not matter at all for Medical School. Like everyone else said :). I'm really late answering this thread, I apologize. If you really want to go to Medical School, go for it. Do it. Do great in undergrad. Try to get really good grades in the pre-req classes (biology, organic chem, etc). Shadow a doctor and volunteer. Get research experience. Study for the MCAT. No one is stopping you from following your dreams and doing what you want to do. You just have work hard. You already sound motivated, you just have to put your brain to work and do it. Don't give up, and don't let what you did in High School determine your future and goals :) because Med School's don't care about your High School grades lol.

    Also, another thing that may be able to help you is to build a solid study regimen. Set aside some time to study. If you know that you struggle with tests (a lot of people do), you have to do everything you can to make yourself comfortable with the test and comfortable with the material on the test; as well as understanding the material. If you don't understand something, read, study, and don't stop until you understand it. I have not taken the MCAT, so I can't really give you too much advice on the MCAT (the MCAT is actually changing in 2015), but on the AAMC website it shows you what subjects and topics are going to be on it, so you should focus on making sure you understand the material. Don't over think, though. Don't stress yourself out about it.
     
    Last edited: 07.08.14
    Midnight786, akram_laiq and Genore like this.
  32. Entadus

    Entadus Happy on 5-HT 7+ Year Member

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    Forget about the MCAT, it's too soon. Your first semester in college should be 100% about your academics. Don't listen to anybody who tells you it's the time to party, socialize, etc. I mean, a little bit of that might be OK... but due to your background in HS, I wouldn't take any chances. Every 'A' you earn is a huge step in the right direction. Look up study strategies and be ready to try things until you find methods that work for YOU. Some things that I did to ensure a 4.0 my first year of college:

    1) read the chapter BEFORE the class. Get to class on time. Take good notes
    2) Ask questions during lecture. Go to office hours if you don't get something. The longer you wait the worse off you'll be
    3) Do your homework. Don't wait. Start the assignment the day of the lecture, as soon as you get out of class. Whether it be the library, at home, coffeeshop, whatever
    4) Keep your notes with you and read them whenever you can. Clarify things in the textbook, online, and on youtube.
    5) DO YOUR HOMEWORK. Even "optional" assignments. This is especially true for math and chemistry class.
    6) Talk to people who are scoring well on tests, and learn their strategies. Go to your college's learning skills center. Get tutoring, even if you don't think you need it.
    7) Consistency is key. Develop your routine and never back down. For every hour you spend in class, you should be studying 2 hours at home. 3 if you are struggling with chemistry.

    Good luck and always keep your goal in mind!
     
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  33. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    Yes ....just yes ... Thank you
    I will not back down
    I've has many people tell me I won't be able to accomplish my dream
    It is guidance like this that will help me become what I wish
    Anyone else with more advise would be highly appreciated
    Thanks
     
  34. Midnight786

    Midnight786 2+ Year Member

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    Thank you .. Thank you
    You've uplifted my spirit ... Things like that will help me aquire my goal Thank you all
     
  35. Beargryllz

    Beargryllz 2+ Year Member

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    High school is a joke and has no weight in the process of becoming a doctor

    My friend graduated 60th out of 66

    He's had a 4.0 since the first semester of college but he wants to go into lawyering (bad idea in 2014)
     
  36. Entadus

    Entadus Happy on 5-HT 7+ Year Member

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    P.S. if you follow this advice, you will be studying more (and more seriously) than 95% of your college classmates. Duh that's the point. Guess what percentage of them will get into med school? Becoming a doctor is not an accident!

    Imagine yourself as a medical student if you have to. Imagine you are working to save someone's life. It's silly, and many on SDN will make fun of you.... But you have to decide for yourself if that's important.

    When I noticed my roommates playing video games instead of studying, sleeping in and blowing off class, getting 'C's on their midterms.... It made perfect sense to me. I knew I was doing things differently because I would become a doctor. And conversely, I knew I would become a doctor because of the way I did things. Maybe this stuff comes perfectly naturally to some... but I never wanted to take a chance. I needed to be sure!
     
  37. superpom_7

    superpom_7 Casually waiting for January 29th..

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    You are extremely welcome. I wish you the best of luck!
     

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