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I thought the hardest part was getting into medical school. I did not really understand matching, but I knew obviously you had to do a residency. I am starting medical school in the fall and I want to spend my 4 years doing whatever I can to match with a good EM program, and then if not good ANY. I am already stressed by reading threads on scrambles, or not matching at all. I am doing the HPSP, so I know that I have to match military and civilian. I also know that if I match military there is low chance of doing civilian. I am glad about that because I do not want to do civilian. (I know I am talking to much sorry) My question is what things can I do to have a strong application for EM please?

Thank You and congrats to all of you!!!!!!!!!!!!:highfive:
 

NinerNiner999

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Spend the next four years focusing on the business of medicine, insurance, and government regulation. Your world may be very different in 4 years.
 

Perrotfish

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I thought the hardest part was getting into medical school. I did not really understand matching, but I knew obviously you had to do a residency. I am starting medical school in the fall and I want to spend my 4 years doing whatever I can to match with a good EM program, and then if not good ANY. I am already stressed by reading threads on scrambles, or not matching at all. I am doing the HPSP, so I know that I have to match military and civilian. I also know that if I match military there is low chance of doing civilian. I am glad about that because I do not want to do civilian. (I know I am talking to much sorry) My question is what things can I do to have a strong application for EM please?

Thank You and congrats to all of you!!!!!!!!!!!!:highfive:
Several things

1) You do not apply military and civilian with HPSP. You have to apply military, and most of the time you have to apply just to the military. You have the option to ask the military to let you apply to civilian residencies instead of (not in addition to) military GME. They almost always say no to this.

2) The military match has different odds than the civilian match. The odds, as well as what you need to do to improve your odds, vary depending on the service you choose, but what they all have in common is that EM is WAY harder to get in the military than in the civilian world. The increased difficulty of EM is by far the biggest difference between the military and civilian match. Thought you should know now, while you can still get out of HPSP, so that you can't whine about it later.

3) That doesn't matter much, though, because you don't know what you want to do yet. I know you think you do, but you don't, and you won't until you've rotated on everything. Lots of people liked the idea of EM who realized that they ultimately didn't like the pace, the cynicism, the high risk of litigation, the terrible patients, etc. You may end up liking family practice, or surgery, or radiology. Work to keep your mind, and your options, open.

4) To keep your options open, do research (if you have time), keep your grades up, and kill the boards. When you get to third year honor your classes try to get through a lot of cores rather than screwing around with electives so that you've seen everything before getting to the (early, December) match. For the military you're also going to need to spend a month doing an 'audition' rotation at each of the sites you want to rank or you really decrease the chances of matching at those sites. That's all you need to do and all you can do anyway.
 

SoCuteMD

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Tangent: I don't know who came up with "The hardest part is getting in!" but whoever did could not BE more wrong. Even if medical school isn't hard for you, residency is an @$$-kicking and a half!
 
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Thank you for taking the time to answer me. I did already mention that I have to apply with the military, but according to our handbook we still have to apply civilian as well. Yes I understand that the chance of me being allowed to do civilian is low. I also know that military EM is very competitive that is why I am asking for advice before I even start in the fall.


I have heard that is true too, that I may go in liking EM, but choose something else. I have worked in the EM for several years, ( in a public hospital in NYC) and I was there because of love, but still and all you'll are wiser than me so I am sure you'll have seen alot of people change their mind. Especially since I was not there as a MD, so my role will be different than before.

I guess the only thing I can do is work hard so that way I am competitive for anything I choose. Thanks again for your time and advice. I hope I will be a good student.
 

Arcan57

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There are a lot of different theories regarding how to be successful in medical school. I would offer that one of the more adaptive ways of thinking about medical school is that it is a job. The same concepts that go far in the job market will help improve your chances of a successful match. Don't antagonize your boss(es), show up on time, be reliable, look professional, and put in the time. And if you have any issues with test-taking, now would be a fantastic time to iron them out. A little cognitive-behavioral therapy mixed in some solid theory of test-taking now is a hell of a lot easier then trying to get programs to overlook that you don't test well when applying for residency.