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I Love Medicine. I Love School. I Need Help.

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by FatallySilent, Dec 16, 2008.

  1. FatallySilent

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    .int.. main().
    .{.
    . cout << "Hello World!" << endl;.
    . cout << ".This is my first post on the Student Doctor Network.!" << endl;.
    . return 0;.
    .} .

    LOL Thought I should make my first post sort of "different". Anyways, I've been a member for a couple months or so, and I've been lurking around looking at how the life of a Medical Student is for all Pre-Med/Med/Post-Med School's (anesthesiologists residents) and I really love it all. I have a passion and a dream and that is to one day be a Medical Doctor. Besides the coolness of having M.D appear next to my name, I've always been interested in drugs (all-kinds ;-)) and helping people feel better. I love helping people, even if that means putting there time in front of my own. I'm in a 2yr college currently in my 3rd year (Lost a year 'messing around') and about to begin Organic Chemistry Courses. I got an A in BIO 101, an A in General Physics II (NON-CALC), but chem classes have both been B-, B-. Erg..lemme stop now I don't want to turn this into another grade topic, SDN has plenty of them. I haven't been serious with my school in the past 2 years or so, but recently I have been trying to achieve more then I have been in my classes. This semester I tried moderately hard and have finals tommorow in my Calc I class and General Chem II class and I'm having a hard time sleeping tonight because I keep thinking about my 'future'. I recieved an A in BIO 101, B in CALC I, and a B- in CEM II. I usually study only before tests, and very very very briefly throughout the week. I know its common sence, want better grades...study more. But when I'm done with my cramming sessions I believe there is NO MORE TO LEARN and then comes the test and I usually score 80-85's on them (3.24 GPA currently, if I retake Comp I, I have a 3.41(Didn't try 1st semester)). My point is that I can retake some classes like CEM I and II in which I recieved B-'s in but should I have to? When me and my other classmates are studying I feel like I know more then they do in the subject, but when grades come out they have a 3.96GPA and I have a measly 3.24. I'm not slow, I catch on to things really fast, and always have. I am thinking of pursing an ChemE undergrad because I really would like to learn more about chemistry and making medicine, but at the same time want to be a Doctor applying that knowledge to patients as well...I am a really calm chill type of guy, and usually never stress about school, I just tell myself its ok things will be better eventually. I learn calmly, take tests calmly, and pretty much live calmly, but tonight is different, I don't know I guess I'm confuzed and don't know if I should just give up or not...Sorry for the rant, I think I just needed to vent. Anybody have any advice? I'd greatly appreciate it.

    --OFF TOPIC--
    People with GPA >3.6, how many hours did you put in a week studying? I have no job and am a full time student (allthough I do get mouth from the father because I'm not helping pay the bills lol.)

    Sincerely,

    // FatallySilent.
     
    #1 FatallySilent, Dec 16, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2008
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  3. Slowpoke

    Slowpoke I haz cheezburger
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    Hey there buddy, I like your enthusiasm!

    I believe the average GPA for MD matriculants is 3.65. So I am sure you know you have a lot of work cut out for you. Whether or not you should give up is certainly a question that you must really dig deep to figure out for yourself. Is this profession really for you? Do you have an affinity of working with people? Certainly, everyone has their own motivation for wanting to pursue a career in medicine, and it's up to you to figure out what motivates you to want to succeed in this field. If being a doctor is what you really want, you should absolutely go for it. But your reasons should be pure, and not because you watch House MD. Put more time in studying, put more effort into getting better grades, and when you have some spare time show that you want to be a doctor by participating in extra currics that highlight yourself as an individual and that you know what you're getting yourself into.

    Everyone has to pay their dues as a Pre-Med. You've got to persevere. You've got to realize that this is a life commitment.
     
  4. brianmartin

    10+ Year Member

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    There are hundreds of hoops to jump through, pre-requisite undergrad courses are only the first hoop. If you want to accomplish your goals, do what you have to do. Maybe a little less "chilling" and some more chemistry problems. Don't take organic at your community college...ideally most of your pre-requisites should be done at a 4 year university. Hopefully one with a good pre-med advisor and committee.
     
  5. silverlining1

    7+ Year Member

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    As for how many hours a week a person should study to get over a 3.6:

    It varies so much that I really can't give even a ballpark. Some people are just quicker to learn and memorize. Some classes require more analysis on exams and therefore you don't need to study/memorize as much beforehand. Some subjects are easier than others. Some people take more classes than others. Some schools may be more challenging than others.

    I kind of slacked in undergrad and probably put in about 10 hours a week on average of studying or working on problem sets. However, I had friends who took much harder courses who pulled frequent all-nighters and got better... or worse... grades than me. So, it just really depends. Studying is such an individualized thing - you have to discover the right strategy for you, whether it's group studying, reviewing nightly, doing flashcards, cramming, reading the text before lecture, whatever.
     
  6. PandaBrewMaster

    PandaBrewMaster w00tcakes
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    :thumbup:

    You won't really glean any useful information from seeing how much people with >3.6 GPAs study....it is definitely totally an individual thing. Some people can acheive the same results with 1 hour of studying that takes others 3 hours to do. Some people work better in groups, others alone, some weeks before the test, others the night before, and still others the morning of the test *cough.* Just find what suits you. Lots of trial and error here...tho its helpful to work that kinda stuff out in HS haha.

    Having a relaxed attitude is good, but only to a certain extent, especially considering the rigor of the field to which are you seeking to enter. Given your GPA, I guess the only way to put it is that you might want to take a slighltly less relaxed attitude towards your academics. Not saying you have to morph into a crazy gunner, but having a good GPA is definitely a big thing when applying to med schools, and concentrating on your goals and striving to reach them (in this case, good grades) is very important. Just keep your target in mind.
     
  7. hal9000

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    You forgot to include iostream.
     
  8. atomi

    atomi Member
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    No there aren't. This isn't nearly as difficult as people make it out to be. Just time-consuming. I could see where it might be difficult if you're working two jobs at the same time. But I worked one, and didn't have a problem. If you can dedicate the time, you will succeed. The material you need to learn isn't beyond the reach of anyone with an average IQ. In fact, this is one of the easier paths to take in life. Everything is already laid out for you. There is no guesswork involved, no risks, no chance. You are told from the beginning what you have to do, and if you do it, then you will become a doctor.
     
  9. MilkmanAl

    MilkmanAl Al the Ass Mod
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    I'm gonna disagree with this statement. Yes, the path to med school is fairly clear with a few exceptions, but that doesn't mean it's easy. It's also not just a matter of dedicating time. Hard work is great and all, but there really is a rock-bottom level of intellect below which you're screwed as far as becoming a doctor is concerned. If you study 18 hours a day all through college to make grades that are just barely good enough to get you into med school, you're going to get absolutely crushed when your workload triples. Also, it's not terribly clear what, exactly, you need to be doing for med school in terms of EC's. Without the help of numerous informed opinions, it's pretty difficult to gauge what types of activities you need to be doing and how much time you need to spend on them.
     
  10. FatallySilent

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    Thank you guys alot, I felt like its too late, but its never too late. I'm going to give it all I got now, and fix my GPA is not like its that bad (3.41 after eng retake). Worst case senario I just do a post-bach/master. What do you guys thing of ChemE as a pre-med though? Do you think its a good idea? Thanks for all your support guys/gals, I really appreciate it.
     
  11. silverlining1

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    As far as whether the topic is okay - sure, you can major in anything and get into med school (provided you do well, enjoy what you're doing, and all that good stuff). However, I think that ChemE tends to be difficult - you may want to consider that factor.
     
  12. mbe36

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    2-3 hours of relaxed study has kept me above 3.6 for the past two years- and recently got me into the 4.0 club. My grades shot up after I stopped cramming. Studying a few hours each day really helps topics sink in. When test time comes, I devote more time- but with the proper preparation it is all review.

    I hardly ever feel stressed before an exam after adopting the "a little each day" method.
     
  13. fish89

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    Hey FatallySilent,
    Here's my two cents. I live my life by the idea that you only get once to live, you should do A) what you love and B) as much as you can to make an impact around you (why waste a life). If you want to do medicine, don't let anything stop you. My inspiration is Abraham Lincoln, who once said "you can do anything you want... You can have anything you want, as long as you hold to it with singleness of purpose." He grew up poor (the famous "I walked 20 miles in the snow to school" line).. I don't remember exactly, but I heard something about him chopping logs for a while before politics... when he ran for office the first time (local office), he lost, and when he became president, the whole nation fell apart. And he struggled his whole life with depression. So when I look at him I know much is possible with diligence and perseverance. I was a horrible student in high school, slept through my classes, etc... but after I graduated, I decided to change. So I read 5 books on how to get better grades, and gave it my all. All I'm saying is that if you want it, you should go get it, don't think about the obstacles, because if you give it your best, you'll at least get "somewhere," and you know that that somewhere - whether in med school or not - will be better than not trying at all - the best way to fail is to give up.

    My friend had a 3.2 and got into a DO school... who's to say that if you have a passion, anything can stop you? How I study is 1) figure out how the professor tests/ what he/she emphasizes, and study to that. I think studying is a game, it's not about "how much you know" but "how well you study"... so figure out your profs 2) devote as much time needed to your gameplan to lay it all down. Don't think about others, don't think about competition (ok, keep it in mind, but soberly), I think the #1 is focusing on what you really want to do and doing everything you can.
     
    #12 fish89, Dec 18, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2008
  14. cyclin M

    cyclin M megaman
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    ChemE is a pretty tough major but the thing about college is that if you cop out and do an easy major you are not interested in, there will be no other time in your life where you will be able to learn so much and so freely as you can now.

    That said, it's your call:D
     
  15. savant

    savant XIII
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