1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

I need advice..Badly.

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by MariaJelice, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. MariaJelice

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I am an incoming freshman going to a RN nursing program at a community college. Becoming a nurse isn't my passion, I really want to be a cardiovascular surgeon. I'm just afraid and want some kind of fall back if I fail to become a surgeon.

    My Plan.

    1.Go into the RN nursing program for 3 years.
    2.Then go into a university and take Pre-Med?
    3.Then go into Medical school and try to become a doctor and specialize.


    Is this a good idea? Or am I being a terrified baby?
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thank you so much. :]
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Whatyousay

    Whatyousay A few loose screws
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,800
    Likes Received:
    53
    MDApps:
    If you don't want to be a nurse, don't waste your time in a nursing program studying things that you don't care about.
     
  4. BuffNerd

    BuffNerd ____________

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    If you're set on attempting to go to medical school, I wouldn't advise going to RN school unless you are in no hurry whatsoever. You will probably have to do at least 2 years of medical school prerequisites after RN school. Even then, you would be rushed due to MCAT, apps, etc. If it took 3 years, you have 6 years of RN school/pre reqs until you would enter med school.

    I would advise majoring in something you are interested in (and that you think you could make a career out of) while you take the med pre reqs. You could major in English, any science, etc. (really whatever you'd like and you can fit in the pre reqs).

    It's up to you ultimately, but going to RN school if you don't want to be a nurse isn't a great idea in my opinion.
     
  5. demh23fan

    Removed

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    If becoming a nurse isn't your passion do NOT pursue it. You live only once. Hard work and determination will definitely allow your aspirations to become a reality. But, becoming a cardiovascular surgeon is not an easy task, be prepared for the tough road ahead and let no one discourage you from following your dreams. Good luck.
     
  6. MariaJelice

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Thank you so much for your replies guys.
     
  7. EsseQuamVideri

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    2
    MDApps:
    Status:
    MD/PhD Student
    It's very difficult for anyone to predict a thing like this before you've even experienced medicine. I would suggest shadowing a bit and talking to different doctors to get an idea of what working in medicine is really like.

    It's a good idea, given the intensity required to get into medical school, to have a general backup plan but pursuing something else (nursing) as your primary goal just won't work. If you want to be a doctor, do it. If you want to be a nurse, do that. They are very different careers.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  8. JESSFALLING

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,115
    Likes Received:
    7
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    You can always become an RN (or PA) down the road if you don't get into medical school or change your mind. However, if you think you want to become a doctor...you should really try to rule this out before becoming a nurse. You're at least four years away from medical school. Every year you pursue something else is a year that you'll be giving up doctor's pay. I would start taking your chemistry and biology right away. They'll be helpful even if you opt out of medical school. You should also start shadowing a doctor. You need to make sure you're interested. And btw, don't worry about picking out a specialty before medical school. Most people change their minds quite a few times before finally deciding! If you get into medical school, you won't need a backup plan.
     
  9. MariaJelice

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Thanks so much again, you guys are extremely helpful!! I will use this knowledge to my full potential. Thank you.
     
  10. Pietrantonio

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    1
    Explain exactly what it is about nursing that makes it not your passion? Are you aware of the job opportunities RN's have in addition to medical school? CRNA, PA's, HEMS, etc, etc.

    Personally, I see nothing wrong with your plan...however, that's me. You have to decide for yourself whether it's the right thing to do. I agree with others, major in something that you are really interested in that you would be happy with as a fall back in the event medical school did not work out.

    Best of luck in your endeavours! I'm more than sure you will make the right decision. :)
     
  11. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
    Faculty SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    21,378
    Likes Received:
    26,344
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    Do not do nursing with the plan to switch to medicine! Earn a bachelor's degree in anything while taking the pre-med requirements (1 year of chemistry, 1 year of biology, 1 year physics, 1 year organic chemistry, 1 year English, also helpful: intro psychology, intro statistics, calculus, biochemistry.)

    Keep in mind that you should maintain a 3.7 gpa (or higher). Get some experience working or volunteering in a clinic or hospital and get some idea of the type of work done by physicians. Keep in mind, too, that clinical care changes over time; there is less demand for cardiothorasic surgeons than there was some years ago as more is being done by cardiologists and interventional radiologists. You may also find that your interest in a special area of medicine may change over time.

    If you do not succeed in your goal of being admitted to medical school, you can enter the nursing profession through a post-bac program. Another option is becoming a physician assistant (generally a graduate program) and working with a surgeon.
     
  12. Perrotfish

    Perrotfish Has an MD in Horribleness
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    7,948
    Likes Received:
    3,655
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I'm not sure I understand why y'all think this is a bad plan. Most incoming freshmen premeds don't become physicians, and I've always thought it was a responsible decision to major in something that leads to some kind of employment like nursing or engineering. While you can always go back and get an RN/NP/PA later, I'm not sure why that's an argument for switching to a biology degree now. Is it even that hard to take the prerequisites as part of an RN program? Don't you get electives? Of course, I guess bio probably would be easier on your GPA.

    BTW has anyone else ever heard of an RN program that doesn't involve a 4 year degree before? This is new to me, it sounds more like an LPN program.
     
  13. candbgirl

    candbgirl Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2005
    Messages:
    3,108
    Likes Received:
    1,916
    The CC near me has a 3 year RN program that is very highly thought of. I think the students ed up with a RN and an AA. They have options with other schools where students can proceed to a 4 year school for the BSN. It for sure isn't a LPN program.
     
  14. Propylene

    Propylene Class of 2017
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I know that nursing programs generally have some grade deflation; it's definitely harder than a bio degree. I think that the best idea has already been said. Do a normal major in college and if it doesn't work out for medical school then do a masters in nursing / PA / whatever.

    Also, the coursework for nursing generally isn't enough for pre-med requirements (Ie only half a year of ochem, english, etc) and there isn't much flexibility to fill in the gaps for those classes.
     
  15. OrdinaryDO

    OrdinaryDO Membership Revoked
    Removed 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,601
    Likes Received:
    993
    Status:
    Medical Student
    if you need something to fall back on, go PA. But in all honesty in my own opinion I don't think you should ever give up once you start the path to medical school, like everyone else said it is hard work, determination, and consistancy. I don't care how long it takes me, M.D., D.O. Ph.D... ;)
     
  16. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
    Faculty SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    21,378
    Likes Received:
    26,344
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    Routes to the RN include: AA degree, 3-year diploma programs (less common than back in the day but still available) and 4-year BSN programs as well as post-bac programs some of which also award a MS.

    That said, BSN degree programs usually require science classes that lack the same level detail as the "pre-med" track science classes, (e.g. you take Chem 101 while pre-meds take Chem 120 and 121 but you won't be prepared for 121 having taken 101 and you might find that there is a schedule conflict between 121 and a nursing course), there is grade deflation, and the "labs" and "clinicals" are serious time sinks. You are also going to get the "why medicine" question in a different way as you have already pursued a career path that is related to science and helping people and you will be asked why you have chosen to change gears. There may also be some resentment that you have taken a slot from someone who really wants to be a nurse and that you went into nursing because you lacked the confidence in yourself to be succesful as a pre-med.

    Keep in mind too that health science majors have the worst odds of being admitted to medical school. Any ideas why?
     
  17. Perrotfish

    Perrotfish Has an MD in Horribleness
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    7,948
    Likes Received:
    3,655
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    PA programs require multiple years of clinical work experience and fairly high grades during a 4 year college degree. Shouldn't a back up plan be a bit more reliable?
     
  18. Pietrantonio

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    1
    Why do healthcare professionals (RN's, RRT's, et al) have the WORST odds? Are you trying to say that those OTHERS do not have the same motivations and desires as those "pre-meds" who all major in Biology and Biochemistry?

    I take offense to that becaues I'm an RRT who has worked VERY hard to get to where I am today.

    Just curious as to how you can make that statement.
     
  19. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
    Faculty SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    21,378
    Likes Received:
    26,344
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    I'm just telling you what the data show:

    https://www.aamc.org/download/161692/data/table18-facts2010mcatgpabymaj1-web.pdf.pdf
     
  20. OrdinaryDO

    OrdinaryDO Membership Revoked
    Removed 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,601
    Likes Received:
    993
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Ouch..the data is there, I figured math and statistics would have very good competition but humanities? Wow. Then you have the majority pool of biological sciences hah, amazing data table.
     
  21. Hotshy

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I was in the same position you were in considering nursing (as a back up) in case the whole med school thing didn't work out. Here's my story, hopefully it can help you.

    I was in my senior year of high school and I decided at that time I would actually pursue this dream of becoming a physician. I was aware of how competitive admissions are, so I considered doing a 4-year BSN program in case I didn't make the cut for med school.

    Then I realized I was only doing nursing because I was afraid, afraid of not making it. I didn't want to be a nurse, I wanted to be a doctor. In my circumstance I realized that being afraid of failing was a bad reason to not pursue my dreams.

    I contacted my state medical school admissions representative about majoring in nursing as well. He essentially told me the same thing LizzyM stated, "Nursing course work does fulfill the prerequisites and lacks the depth of the sciences courses necessary for medical school admission."

    So I made the choice to major in bio and go all out with my intentions to get into med school. I'm heading into my junior year now and things have been going really all around and they can go well for you too. Also if you are involved in the nursing major you're going to have clinical rotations and other things that could prevent you from committing to involved extracurricular/research, the types of things that medical school admissions committees want to see.

    Bottom Line: Become an RN if nursing is your passion, but don't do it just because your afraid of not making it into med school. I knew if I didn't give this my full effort I would look back as a nurse and think of what could have been.

    Go for it, do your best and don't look back :)
     
    #20 Hotshy, Aug 7, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  22. Pietrantonio

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thank you Lizzy.

    Well the data is good, however, the %'s are not that much different when you compare the # of matriculants to the # of applicants for each primary undergraduate major. ~40% from each major were matriculated with only ~35% matriculating from the specialized health science major.

    It's obvious that a student goes to nursing school to become a nurse with no intentions of medical school, etc etc and I can see why the # of applicants is only 1,181 for 2010. BUT, what I still do not understand is what the adcom for medical schools are considering for those of us who are specialized health science majors - especially, according to this 2010 study, that the MCAT and GPA scores are highly competitive with the other undergrad majors.
     
  23. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
    Faculty SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    21,378
    Likes Received:
    26,344
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    The health majors have a statistically signficantly lower likelihood of being admitted. The p-value is much less than 0.01.


    I also see a relationship between average MCAT for applicants and the likelihood of being admitted. Note that applicants who were health majors have a lower MCAT but they also get admitted (when they get admitted) with lower MCAT scores.

    It turns out that majors where the average MCAT for matriculants is <32, you have a deficit of applicants with that major compared with what you'd expect if all majors were admitted in the same proportion.

    I wonder if race, ethnicity and socio-economic status vary by major and if one controlled for these variables that are known to have an influence on MCAT, if the differences in likelihood of being admitted would disappear.
     
    #22 LizzyM, Aug 7, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  24. Pietrantonio

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    1
    I apologize to the OP for "Hijacking" this thread for a moment.

    I would like to think that the "history" behind my decision to become an RRT would not place me in the ~70% of applicants to be denied admission.

    But this is something that can be discussed at a different time.

    To the OP: I have re-read your initial post, and it's a common question/concern that most pre-meds ask on this forum.

    In conclusion, you have to do what is right for YOU. Nursing is a huge committment and your patient's will count on you and your Nursing attitude to achieve a "JOB WELL DONE". If you're NOT passionate about Nursing it will show in the quality of: 1). The care you provide to your patients and 2). The medical professionals you work with. Would you want to have a Nurse who is not passionate about their profession take care of you?

    In my opinion, I feel the Nursing profession is currently super saturated with individuals who go into it with the wrong intentions. With the given state of the economy I feel my assumption is not far off.

    Now, I'm not telling you to fold your ideas of Nursing school, but make sure you go into it for the right reasons. If you are 100% certain that Nursing is NOT for you...there are lots of other undergraduate majors to choose from.

    All of us here on the SDN forum can go back and forth telling you what YOU should do, but the bottom line, is that only you can make the decision.

    Best of luck with your endeavours. :)
     

Share This Page