i need advice

Discussion in 'General International Discussion' started by janula3, Jun 23, 2002.

  1. janula3

    janula3 New Member

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    hey,
    i need a little guidance. i have a 3.5 gpa but really really bad mcat scores. (20) :( i've taken them twice and haven't improved now..i know i won't get into any us schools, so i was thinking of going int'l. I'm open for anything really. i was looking at schools in poland and st. george. i'm not really familiar with any other ones. can anyone give me some input on other schools like ones in ireland, australian etc.? Also does anyone have any adice for me about my situation or is anyone in the same boat?my mcats really discouraged me and now i don't know what i should do. i want to become a doctor, but i don't know where to turn.
    thanks
     
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  3. The Pill Counter

    The Pill Counter Senior Member

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    Trinity in Dublin wouldn't require MCAT scores, but the rest of the Irish schools would. All Australian schools would, and they would demand a higher score. A 3.5 is pretty good, so I wouldn't start thinking Poland or Caribbean yet, that should be a last resort. Maybe give the MCAT another go? It's been discussed on a previous thread, but England's pretty much no go, but Dundee, Warwick, and maybe Bristol would be more amenable to North American applicants. I spoke to MANY admissions officers in UK last year, those schools seemed the most optimistic. But beware, all routes mean big bucks. I'm in my first year, and the mounting debt is already starting to scare me.
     
  4. chesspro_md

    chesspro_md Member

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    IF you go to the caribbean, i would choose either sgu or ross. Both are good schools with excellent pass rates (higher than 40% of the US schools).
     

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