soso809

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I am a non-trad student and will be starting my Pre-Pharm studies in August. On top of that I will also be getting an accounting degree.

Just wondering if anyone had any tips or advice to share with me? I am shooting for the University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy School since I will already be living in Pittsburgh for undergrad.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. What are some things you wish you had learned earlier then later?
 

medicalCPA

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I am a non-trad student and will be starting my Pre-Pharm studies in August. On top of that I will also be getting an accounting degree.

Just wondering if anyone had any tips or advice to share with me? I am shooting for the University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy School since I will already be living in Pittsburgh for undergrad.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. What are some things you wish you had learned earlier then later?
Yay for accounting majors! There is a University of Pittsburgh thread, although it's geared toward questions about the school.

One thing I wish I had learned earlier was that there are out of state public schools that grant you in state status after one year. Had I known this, I would have applied to such schools. While it's great to have a top choice school, I also suggest that you apply to at least one more school so that you have other options in case Pitt does not work out.

Good luck to you.
 

SoccerCoach10

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I am a non-trad student and will be starting my Pre-Pharm studies in August. On top of that I will also be getting an accounting degree.

Just wondering if anyone had any tips or advice to share with me? I am shooting for the University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy School since I will already be living in Pittsburgh for undergrad.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. What are some things you wish you had learned earlier then later?
I suggest getting the best grades that you can possibly get (which is a no brainer, I know:) ) Do well in OChem and Bio courses, as well as Calculus, it'll help you on the PCAT. Shoot for an 80+ on the PCAT. Also, don't forget extracurricular type activities. It might not be good enough to just have pharmacy experience and good grades. Good luck to you!
 
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soso809

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Thanks a lot everyone! I will be sure to take everyones tips and carry them with me on my journey. I am not counting on getting but sleep but still I am really looking forward to all of it :D
 
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soso809

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I am assuming from your name medicalcpa that you are an accounting major as well? Or a former CPA?
 

medicalCPA

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I am assuming from your name medicalcpa that you are an accounting major as well? Or a former CPA?
Yes to the first question, no to the second. I'm studying both Biology and Accounting in college. I could probably take the CPA exam when I'm done, but we'll see.
 

IrishRxMan

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Thanks a lot everyone! I will be sure to take everyones tips and carry them with me on my journey. I am not counting on getting but sleep but still I am really looking forward to all of it :D
I would buy one of the PCAT prep books from Kapplan or one of the other reputable publishers. I wouldn't recommend spending the $1200 on the Kapplan course because they just teach you how to take the test, not content. Just remember that the super easy questions count the exact same as the super hard ones. You don't get extra points for spending ten minutes working on a hard one while not having enough time to get to the other fifteen easy ones before time is up. I got an 89 on my PCAT by holding to that strategy, which from what I hear is just what they teach in the Kapplan course. Don't forget to review geometry, b/c it showed up on my PCAT. I hadn't seen in in 12 years and it blew my mind.

Definitely get involved in one community service project that you can do repetitively, like working at a food bank. If the school you go to has a pre-pharmacy club, you should consider joining it. That and studying like mad on all your science and math (they usually have to have been taken within 5 years of application) will get you to a pretty good position. Also, get in good with a well respected professor in one of your science classes like organic. You will be able to get a good letter of reference from a professor. Also, you may want to see about getting a job at a pharmacy and getting a letter of reference from one of the pharmacists. If you can't get a job in one, see if you can just observe how the pharmacy works. At my school, it's a requirement that you have a minimum of 80 observational hours prior to the first day of class so you have an idea of what it is to be a pharmacist. It kind of makes sure you really want to do the job.
 

b*rizzle

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Study hard and do well in your pre-reqs. It's the best studying you could ever do for the PCAT. If that doesn't help, get the Kaplan prep book. But really, focus on your classes. Plan on taking the PCAT at least twice, unless you really manage to kick a$$ on the first round. If you DO do well the first time, don't take it again. Not worth stress/money.

Get some work experience, too. I can't tell you how many times I felt like I was at an advantage over classmates that hadn't set foot behind a pharmacy counter, especially early on in pharmacy school, when things seem particularly overwhelming.

You need to be a well-rounded person with good spoken and written communication skills, too. It's getting harder and harder to get into pharmacy school, so you really need to be the package deal. I have some classmates that are incredibly intelligent & very gifted students, but don't have a lick of common sense, nor can they communicate effectively with patients or peers. Don't be these people.

Don't complain if you struggle during the admissions process (i.e., get a few waitlists, rejects). It's okay to vent occasionally, but bear in mind that pharmacy school is much tougher than your pre-pharmacy work, so it's better to go ahead and toughen your skin now. If you can't handle your pre-reqs, then you probably will struggle in pharmacy school.

Hope this helps, and best of luck!:luck:
 

DoctorRx1986

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Study hard and do well in your pre-reqs. It's the best studying you could ever do for the PCAT. If that doesn't help, get the Kaplan prep book. But really, focus on your classes. Plan on taking the PCAT at least twice, unless you really manage to kick a$$ on the first round. If you DO do well the first time, don't take it again. Not worth stress/money.

Get some work experience, too. I can't tell you how many times I felt like I was at an advantage over classmates that hadn't set foot behind a pharmacy counter, especially early on in pharmacy school, when things seem particularly overwhelming.

You need to be a well-rounded person with good spoken and written communication skills, too. It's getting harder and harder to get into pharmacy school, so you really need to be the package deal. I have some classmates that are incredibly intelligent & very gifted students, but don't have a lick of common sense, nor can they communicate effectively with patients or peers. Don't be these people.

Don't complain if you struggle during the admissions process (i.e., get a few waitlists, rejects). It's okay to vent occasionally, but bear in mind that pharmacy school is much tougher than your pre-pharmacy work, so it's better to go ahead and toughen your skin now. If you can't handle your pre-reqs, then you probably will struggle in pharmacy school.

Hope this helps, and best of luck!:luck:

Really? I've heard the opposite from many pharmacy students. Most of them tell me pharmacy school and its classes are not really hard, at least conceptually. The main problem is the volume of information you have to learn in a given time frame....that's what makes it "harder" in a sense than pre-pharmacy coursework. In fact, i've been told that some of the concepts from certain undergrad courses, such as organic chemistry, are actually more difficult to comprehend and learn than the principles you learn in pharmacy school. Also, this depends on the school too. Some pharmacy schools teach a course in medicinal chemistry or physical chemistry. Others don't. The point is, i've simply heard it's a challenge, but if that you made it through the pre-reqs AND did well in them, you should be fine in p-school. If it were so insanely difficult, I believe the attrition rate would be quite high, but fortunately, probably around 97-98% of students graduate. An acquaintance of mine is currently about to finish his P1 year at Nova and he told me organic chemistry is much harder than anything he's seen so far...i believe if you have the intellectual capacity to actually get in, you definitely have what it takes to make it through. But don't get me wrong...tough or not, I certainly plan on studying as if it were very difficult to ensure I can learn the necessary clinical skills to become an effective practictioner.
 

AbsoluteEthanol

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I am a non-trad student and will be starting my Pre-Pharm studies in August. On top of that I will also be getting an accounting degree.

Just wondering if anyone had any tips or advice to share with me? I am shooting for the University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy School since I will already be living in Pittsburgh for undergrad.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. What are some things you wish you had learned earlier then later?

hey there soso, first and foremost, best of luck to you on your quest! here are some very important suggestions for you:

1) Study up, especially in classes that cover PCAT topics (i.e. ochem, biochem, physiology...etc) this will really alleviate the process of studying for the PCAT
2) Get involved in the retail and/or clinical settings, the more experience you have there, the better!
3) If you don't do great in science classes (Bs and Cs) pick up some junk work, such as economics, or speech to raise that overall back up!

good luck to ya!
 

medicalCPA

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hey there soso, first and foremost, best of luck to you on your quest! here are some very important suggestions for you:

1) Study up, especially in classes that cover PCAT topics (i.e. ochem, biochem, physiology...etc) this will really alleviate the process of studying for the PCAT
2) Get involved in the retail and/or clinical settings, the more experience you have there, the better!
3) If you don't do great in science classes (Bs and Cs) pick up some junk work, such as economics, or speech to raise that overall back up!

good luck to ya!
Since when is economics "junk work?"
 
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soso809

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hey there soso, first and foremost, best of luck to you on your quest! here are some very important suggestions for you:

1) Study up, especially in classes that cover PCAT topics (i.e. ochem, biochem, physiology...etc) this will really alleviate the process of studying for the PCAT
2) Get involved in the retail and/or clinical settings, the more experience you have there, the better!
3) If you don't do great in science classes (Bs and Cs) pick up some junk work, such as economics, or speech to raise that overall back up!

good luck to ya!
Hi Absolute,

Thanks for the well wishes:)
 

IrishRxMan

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hey there soso, first and foremost, best of luck to you on your quest! here are some very important suggestions for you:

1) Study up, especially in classes that cover PCAT topics (i.e. ochem, biochem, physiology...etc) this will really alleviate the process of studying for the PCAT
2) Get involved in the retail and/or clinical settings, the more experience you have there, the better!
3) If you don't do great in science classes (Bs and Cs) pick up some junk work, such as economics, or speech to raise that overall back up!

good luck to ya!

Not to downplay what others have said, it really depends on the program(s) you are applying to. Each school is different on what they look at and some of their pre-reqs. The school I go to looks at your overall GPA and then takes out your math and science GPA and looks at that as a separate score.
 

IrishRxMan

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Really? I've heard the opposite from many pharmacy students. Most of them tell me pharmacy school and its classes are not really hard, at least conceptually. The main problem is the volume of information you have to learn in a given time frame....that's what makes it "harder" in a sense than pre-pharmacy coursework. In fact, i've been told that some of the concepts from certain undergrad courses, such as organic chemistry, are actually more difficult to comprehend and learn than the principles you learn in pharmacy school. Also, this depends on the school too. Some pharmacy schools teach a course in medicinal chemistry or physical chemistry. Others don't. The point is, i've simply heard it's a challenge, but if that you made it through the pre-reqs AND did well in them, you should be fine in p-school. If it were so insanely difficult, I believe the attrition rate would be quite high, but fortunately, probably around 97-98% of students graduate. An acquaintance of mine is currently about to finish his P1 year at Nova and he told me organic chemistry is much harder than anything he's seen so far...i believe if you have the intellectual capacity to actually get in, you definitely have what it takes to make it through. But don't get me wrong...tough or not, I certainly plan on studying as if it were very difficult to ensure I can learn the necessary clinical skills to become an effective practictioner.
Again, it depends on the person taking the classes and how the program is set up. Some schools can't fit in all the classes you need to be considered going from P1 to P2, etc. so they have mandatory summer school. My program does block scheduling with three blocks of five weeks each semester. We're in class for some 3 hour stretches with breaks, but we don't have to do any schoolwork over the summer. It's a little more high stress b/c of the time crunch, but some classes last two or three blocks and you usually only have two or three classes each block in the P1 year.
 

Sparda29

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Really? I've heard the opposite from many pharmacy students. Most of them tell me pharmacy school and its classes are not really hard, at least conceptually. The main problem is the volume of information you have to learn in a given time frame....that's what makes it "harder" in a sense than pre-pharmacy coursework. In fact, i've been told that some of the concepts from certain undergrad courses, such as organic chemistry, are actually more difficult to comprehend and learn than the principles you learn in pharmacy school. Also, this depends on the school too. Some pharmacy schools teach a course in medicinal chemistry or physical chemistry. Others don't. The point is, i've simply heard it's a challenge, but if that you made it through the pre-reqs AND did well in them, you should be fine in p-school. If it were so insanely difficult, I believe the attrition rate would be quite high, but fortunately, probably around 97-98% of students graduate. An acquaintance of mine is currently about to finish his P1 year at Nova and he told me organic chemistry is much harder than anything he's seen so far...i believe if you have the intellectual capacity to actually get in, you definitely have what it takes to make it through. But don't get me wrong...tough or not, I certainly plan on studying as if it were very difficult to ensure I can learn the necessary clinical skills to become an effective practictioner.
Yes, that is true. Pharmacy School and Medical School are pretty easy in terms of the concepts that you learn, but the problem is that you have to learn a lot in a short amount of time.

Organic Chemistry is hard because it is like a foreign language. But once you understand the fundamentals of Organic Chem, the rest comes pretty easily.