If DO's specialize in pain, why is the focus Prim Care?

smaroof

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One thing I noticed is that the majority of OMT is focused around pain. I've shadowed DO Anesthesiologists and DO Physical Medicine physicians and its seems these doctors really use their OMT techniques since all their patients are suffering from pain. If that is the case, why do DO schools emphasize primary care? If I am having pain in my back, I would go to a pain clinic--not expect my primary doctor to help me out that much.
 

DrMom

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apparently you haven't spent much time in family medicine or the emergency department. tons of patients are seen for things like back pain.
 

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DrMom said:
apparently you haven't spent much time in family medicine or the emergency department. tons of patients are seen for things like back pain.
How true! I picked up a lady on the ambulance just yesterday c/o, low and behold, back pain for several years. How they got chest pain out of that one, I still can't figure out.
 

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smaroof said:
One thing I noticed is that the majority of OMT is focused around pain. I've shadowed DO Anesthesiologists and DO Physical Medicine physicians and its seems these doctors really use their OMT techniques since all their patients are suffering from pain. If that is the case, why do DO schools emphasize primary care? If I am having pain in my back, I would go to a pain clinic--not expect my primary doctor to help me out that much.
No, this is far from true. In a great majority of cases, patients go to their primary care physician for pain. They are then later referred to specialists if the physician cannot correct the pain with therapy or medication. In the case of DO's, OMM can be used as another technique to take care of it, thus preventing the referral.
 
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smaroof

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OSUdoc08 said:
No, this is far from true. In a great majority of cases, patients go to their primary care physician for pain. They are then later referred to specialists if the physician cannot correct the pain with therapy or medication. In the case of DO's, OMM can be used as another technique to take care of it, thus preventing the referall.
good point
 

fun8stuff

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smaroof said:
One thing I noticed is that the majority of OMT is focused around pain. I've shadowed DO Anesthesiologists and DO Physical Medicine physicians and its seems these doctors really use their OMT techniques since all their patients are suffering from pain. If that is the case, why do DO schools emphasize primary care? If I am having pain in my back, I would go to a pain clinic--not expect my primary doctor to help me out that much.

I assume you make this assumption because you only go to your FP for annual checkups and such. However, there are a ton of people that actually go for many other reasons- mostly due to pain from pathology. A FP does not focus on general checkups? lol. I think you would be hard pressed to be able to enter a pain clinic without a referal from your FP. Anyways, I think most people that have back pain will either go to a FP, chiropractor, or some other alternative such as acupuncture doc.
 

Shinken

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I think the OP is analyzing things from a pre-med perspective without spending too much time in an actual FP clinic.

There are tons of patients going to the FP clinic because of pain (back, elbow, and particularly shoulder). My preceptor used OMT on all cases, in addition to the usual medical therapies (pain meds, steroid injections).

Most people don't self-refer themselves to a "pain clinic" because most people don't know the source of their pain. In other words, if your shoulder hurts after a game of softball, do you set an appointment at a pain clinic or do you go to your FP to see what's wrong? (bursitis, rotator cuff tear, etc.). You might not necessarily need any treatment beyond rest and OTC anti-inflammatories / analgesics.

Long story short...musculoskeletal pain is one of the top reasons why people see FPs, and OMT fits in very nicely in the overall pain management strategies.
 

normalforce

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Shinken said:
I think the OP is analyzing things from a pre-med perspective without spending too much time in an actual FP clinic.

There are tons of patients going to the FP clinic because of pain (back, elbow, and particularly shoulder). My preceptor used OMT on all cases, in addition to the usual medical therapies (pain meds, steroid injections).

Most people don't self-refer themselves to a "pain clinic" because most people don't know the source of their pain. In other words, if your shoulder hurts after a game of softball, do you set an appointment at a pain clinic or do you go to your FP to see what's wrong? (bursitis, rotator cuff tear, etc.). You might not necessarily need any treatment beyond rest and OTC anti-inflammatories / analgesics.

Long story short...musculoskeletal pain is one of the top reasons why people see FPs, and OMT fits in very nicely in the overall pain management strategies.
Top reasons for PCP visits:

1. Back pain/Musculoskeletal pain
2. Upper resp. symptoms
3. Headache

All treated effectively with OMT.
 

MaloCCOM

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Malo, I love your stories man. Keep that journal up. It's a great read!
 

JimmyMallo

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Might seem prejudiced but most people I have met that use pain clinics are there for drugs that their FP wouldn't give them. OMM might work in that setting but I don't know if it would be well recieved. I do think that OMM sessions should be required before referal. If course what do I know :confused:
 

DORoe

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JimmyMallo said:
Might seem prejudiced but most people I have met that use pain clinics are there for drugs that their FP wouldn't give them. OMM might work in that setting but I don't know if it would be well recieved. I do think that OMM sessions should be required before referal. If course what do I know :confused:
But....but....I'm allergic to Toradol?!? The only thing that works for me is demesomething demerol maybe?
 

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DORoe said:
But....but....I'm allergic to Toradol?!? The only thing that works for me is demesomething demerol maybe?
:laugh:

I loved when drug seekers in the ER would say things like that during my EM rotation. "I always get that di-di-dil-dila-dilaudid, is that what it's called?" During my rotation one of the pain clinics in town closed so every seeker in town came in... :mad: