If you change your intended specialty in 3rd/4th year, does it detract from past resume experiences?

cryhavoc

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Say you volunteered geriatrics, was an officer on geriatric club, did geriatric research and then you get to rotations and realize that emergency medicine was your true calling.

Does that switch detract from your past resume accomplishment in a major or hindering way? What if you have the proper board score for the new residency decision?
 

BorntobeDO?

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Not if you just drop all your EC's except the research. Then you simply say that research is what was available and you had an interest then segway into how that led you where you are today. Drop the other fluff, I see nothing about clubs or being an officer that really makes people stand out.
 
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cryhavoc

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So it hurts to leave it on the resume so much you should drop it off? Like if you built a charity and raised so much money for a disease, but it wasn't a disease for the specialty you now want to apply to, you shouldn't mention it on a resume?
 
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IslandStyle808

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Not if you just drop all your EC's except the research. Then you simply say that research is what was available and you had an interest then segway into how that led you where you are today. Drop the other fluff, I see nothing about clubs or being an officer that really makes people stand out.
The main reason why I only did research. If there is a ton of stuff that is specialty specific, it would far more difficult to explain away if I do switch to another specialty.

However, with that said, the former EM PD I have spoken with has seen people with various clubs on their ERAS application (ex. anesthesia club). So it may not be that big a deal if you do include it.

The other non-geriatrics I think should be okay to include definitely.
 

LyMed

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Leave major accomplishments, but you can leave the interest group out.
 
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hallowmann

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So it hurts to leave it on the resume so much you should drop it off? Like if you built a charity and raised so much money for a disease, but it wasn't a disease for the specialty you now want to apply to, you shouldn't mention it on a resume?
To be honest, a club or something barely means anything for your residency app, but multiple interests in a different field could raise eyebrows. In general there's no point including those weak ECs unless they demonstrate sustained interest in a field.

That said, starting your own foundation, blah blah blah, demonstrates leadership, organizational skills, planning, etc. All things that any residency program would value. Research is similar. Its should be pretty obvious what's beneficial and what isn't.
 
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BorntobeDO?

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So it hurts to leave it on the resume so much you should drop it off? Like if you built a charity and raised so much money for a disease, but it wasn't a disease for the specialty you now want to apply to, you shouldn't mention it on a resume?
I might say that, even if the disease wasn't for the specialty, all your really doing is saying that it was important for you. Lots of things can be important to me and have nothing to do with my choice of specialty.
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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The only thing I'll have on my ERAS is my biographical information, scores and work/research experience prior to med school. Nothing else. I'll let you guys know how it'll work out.
 
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acapnial

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Say you volunteered geriatrics, was an officer on geriatric club, did geriatric research and then you get to rotations and realize that emergency medicine was your true calling.

Does that switch detract from your past resume accomplishment in a major or hindering way? What if you have the proper board score for the new residency decision?
You could always leave it on and use your change in desired field as a way to highlight why you decided to pursue your new field in your personal statement. "I entered my clinical years planning on becoming a geriatrician, but once I rotated in emergency medicine, I was struck with the breadth of clinical practice the field involves- practicing high acuity care on critical patients and also providing basic medical care to the county's neediest patients" or whatever it is people like about emergency medicine. It won't hurt that you changed your mind as long as they understand your thought process, and it's a reasonable thought process. They're not going to worry you're using EM as a backup to a career in geriatrics, at any rate.
 

hallowmann

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The only thing I'll have on my ERAS is my biographical information, scores and work/research experience prior to med school. Nothing else. I'll let you guys know how it'll work out.
So to be honest my app including mostly the same, with the exception of one abstract at the end of 3rd/beginning of 4th year and one recurrent volunteering experience in a free clinic in the preclinical years. Unless you're applying to something super competitive, most people don't do much else in med school. Most residency programs are aware of this.
 
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Ibn Alnafis MD

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So to be honest my app including mostly the same, with the exception of one abstract at the end of 3rd/beginning of 4th year and one volunteering experience in a free clinic in the preclinical years. Unless you're applying to something super competitive, most people don't do much else in med school. Most residency programs are aware of this.
If I had an abstract, I'd definitely put it. However, I didn't do any research and did few EC's here and there that amount to nothing. I feel that including pointless EC's on the application can be viewed as a way to overcompensate for weaknesses. Therefore, unless it's research or some outstanding experience, I wouldn't put it.
 
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