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I'll take the norco but I don't want the antibiotic

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ldiot

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Happens sometimes even when the antibiotic is like $2. Usually like a one week supply of norco out of an urgent care. Patient profile is littered with various pain meds throughout the last couple years.

I see it happen kind of often with different people but it really pisses me off, have you ever straight up denied someone at the register over this kind of situation and returned the script?

Or are they just too stupid to realize that the pain med does nothing to help an infection?
 

rph3664

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Back when I worked in retail, we had one customer in particular who always did this. We got rid of her by telling her that there was a new rule that people had to pick up all their prescriptions, or none at all.

We sure did - for her. ;)
 

confettiflyer

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It's probably viral anyway, doing the rest of us a favor w/ resistance, haha.


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Dr Wario

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If you want to pick up just the pain medication, we will need to contact the office first to see if they are ok with that.
 
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wagrxm2000

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It's probably viral anyway, doing the rest of us a favor w/ resistance, haha.


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I could be wrong but isn't that why everyone prescribes a z-pak? I've always seen that as the doc saying they want something even though its viral so here you go.

Anyways, no they don't get the pain med without the antibiotic.
 

RxPreceptor

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    Absolutely not...publix pharmacy use to give "free" antibiotics, which always made this practice really fun for my store. Perfectly fine not to fill the antiemetic though (these were the days before generic ondansetron). The vomiting association will hopefully deter him/her from thinking about abusing opiates...pro re nata
     
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    lcow2004

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    Happens sometimes even when the antibiotic is like $2. Usually like a one week supply of norco out of an urgent care. Patient profile is littered with various pain meds throughout the last couple years.

    I see it happen kind of often with different people but it really pisses me off, have you ever straight up denied someone at the register over this kind of situation and returned the script?

    Or are they just too stupid to realize that the pain med does nothing to help an infection?

    Why is this a problem? I always let customer pick up whatever they want. If I force them to pick up all their prescriptions or nothing, they may refuse to pick up any and that's multiple scripts lost for the pharmacy or worse, bring all their business elsewhere that will fill whatever they want. Letting them choose at least gives me the business of the few scripts he wants to pick up. Besides, even if they pick up all the prescriptions, they may choose not to take them anyway..
     
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    Momus

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    Why is this a problem? I always let customer pick up whatever they want. If I force them to pick up all their prescriptions or nothing, they may refuse to pick up any and that's multiple scripts lost for the pharmacy or worse, bring all their business elsewhere that will fill whatever they want. Letting them choose at least gives me the business of the few scripts he wants to pick up. Besides, even if they pick up all the prescriptions, they may choose not to take them anyway..

    Why do I care about growing a business? I get paid the same. I'd rather fill 80 normal rxs than 300 oxycodone rxs anyday. They can go elsewhere to get their high. I have absolutely 0 interest to make a profit on every customer.
     
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    Dr Wario

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    Why do I care about growing a business? I get paid the same. I'd rather fill 80 normal rxs than 300 oxycodone rxs anyday. They can go elsewhere to get their high. I have absolutely 0 interest to make a profit on every customer.

    I think we all would practice quite differently if we owned the business or our compensation was linked to pharmacy profit in any meaningful way.
     

    Momus

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    I think we all would practice quite differently if we owned the business or our compensation was linked to pharmacy profit in any meaningful way.
    Without a doubt, if you see the green goes straight to our pocket, shady sales will be going through the roof. That's why I always refer my oxy fiends to the next door independent. They will fill anything cash. That's how they survive.
     
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    lcow2004

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    Without a doubt, if you see the green goes straight to our pocket, shady sales will be going through the roof. That's why I always refer my oxy fiends to the next door independent. They will fill anything cash. That's how they survive.
    This is for sure. I work at an independent and every script means $ :D
     

    Humble Sloth

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    Happens sometimes even when the antibiotic is like $2. Usually like a one week supply of norco out of an urgent care. Patient profile is littered with various pain meds throughout the last couple years.

    I see it happen kind of often with different people but it really pisses me off, have you ever straight up denied someone at the register over this kind of situation and returned the script?

    Or are they just too stupid to realize that the pain med does nothing to help an infection?

    You shouldn't let this bother you. It is up to the patient what drugs to take. You would rather them get the antibiotics then throw them in the trash outside wasting humanity's resources? Maybe try not to be so judgmental.
     

    Dr Wario

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    You shouldn't let this bother you. It is up to the patient what drugs to take. You would rather them get the antibiotics then throw them in the trash outside wasting humanity's resources? Maybe try not to be so judgmental.

    If you talk about wasting resources, perhaps if all pharmacists are a bit more firm seekers won't waste 300-400 of taxpayer dollars to score 12 norco.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    If you talk about wasting resources, perhaps if all pharmacists are a bit more firm seekers won't waste 300-400 of taxpayer dollars to score 12 norco.
    Yeah that's a great idea. So refuse to give an opiate drug addict their pure opiates. Then when they rob your house two hours later for money for street heroin and accidentally run over your child backing out with your garage with your stolen car, that 140,000 USD brain surgery on your child will be a even bigger waste of tax payers dollars.

    I don't understand how you can call yourself professionals and be so judgmental of people different from you. A customer is not breaking any laws by refusing to take their prescribed anti-biotics with their prescribed opiates. We are not judges that engage in condescending speculation based on soft evidence. Why would you go into healthcare if you are not capable of feeling empathy for humanity? Power tripping pharmacists. I'm sure you are the same type of pharmacist that refuses to give out clean needles to addicts helping spread HIV and hepatitis in your own communities.
     
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    VA Hopeful Dr

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    Yeah that's a great idea. So refuse to give an opiate drug addict their pure opiates. Then when they rob your house two hours later for money for street heroin and accidentally run over your child backing out with your garage with your stolen car, that 140,000 USD brain surgery on your child will be a even bigger waste of tax payers dollars.

    I don't understand how you can call yourself professionals and be so judgmental of other people. A customer is not breaking any laws by refusing to take their prescribed anti-biotics with their prescribed opiates. We are not judges that engage in condescending speculation based on soft evidence. Why would you go into healthcare if you are not capable of feeling empathy for humanity? Power tripping pharmacists.
    Actually, as professionals we are absolutely supposed to use our PROFESSIONAL judgement when doing our jobs. For me, that means deciding what drugs to write for given a particular patient's problem. For you pharmacists, it means deciding if the drugs I've written for will cause harm.

    Continuing to feed an addict's addiction is absolutely causing harm.

    As for your stupid what if scenario - if we're supposed to consider nonsense like that every time then we might as well give every addict just a buffet of narcotics to hopefully prevent any type of criminal behavior in the future.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    Actually, as professionals we are absolutely supposed to use our PROFESSIONAL judgement when doing our jobs. For me, that means deciding what drugs to write for given a particular patient's problem. For you pharmacists, it means deciding if the drugs I've written for will cause harm.

    Continuing to feed an addict's addiction is absolutely causing harm.

    As for your stupid what if scenario - if we're supposed to consider nonsense like that every time then we might as well give every addict just a buffet of narcotics to hopefully prevent any type of criminal behavior in the future.

    "we might as well give every addict just a buffet of narcotics to hopefully prevent any type of criminal behavior in the future"

    I support this.

    Since opening its doors in 2003, Insite has been a safe, health-focused place where people inject drugs and connect to health care services – from primary care to treat disease and infection, to addiction counselling and treatment, to housing and community supports.
    http://supervisedinjection.vch.ca/

    Insite will soon be providing opiate addicts with pure heroin to increase harm reduction in communities.

    This is the future of treatment for opiate addicts in America. Variation in street opiate dosage due to fent. spiking is the number one killer of opiate addicts. This risk is completely reduced when addicts are given access to pharmaceutical grade opiates.
     
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    ldiot

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    "we might as well give every addict just a buffet of narcotics to hopefully prevent any type of criminal behavior in the future"

    I support this.

    Since opening its doors in 2003, Insite has been a safe, health-focused place where people inject drugs and connect to health care services – from primary care to treat disease and infection, to addiction counselling and treatment, to housing and community supports.
    http://supervisedinjection.vch.ca/

    Insite will soon be providing opiate addicts with pure heroin to increase harm reduction in communities.

    This is the future of treatment for opiate addicts in America. Variation in street opiate dosage due to fent. spiking is the number one killer of opiate addicts. This risk is completely reduced when addicts are given access to pharmaceutical grade opiates.

    Your solution is providing greater access? Why do you think prescription drug abuse results in more deaths per year than heroin and cocaine combined? Is it because they are pharmaceutical grade products that are safer? No, it's because they are more accessible. Yet I am the bad guy for trying to reduce the accessibility of these drugs for people who have the intent to abuse? Your kidding right?

    You don't treat heroin addiction by providing heroin. You treat the addiction by breaking both the physical and psychological dependence.

    You shouldn't let this bother you. It is up to the patient what drugs to take. You would rather them get the antibiotics then throw them in the trash outside wasting humanity's resources? Maybe try not to be so judgmental.

    Waste resources? The "patient" is wasting resources by abusing the medical system for drug abuse. I'm not judgemental. The doctor doesn't know if the patient is abusing the system or not. The intentions become clear when they are in and out of an urgent care every month with narcotic scripts and never pick up their antibiotic. It is my job to dispense drugs for legitimate medical need, evaluating the situation and fulfilling this obligation does not make me judgemental.
     
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    zelman

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    Yeah that's a great idea. So refuse to give an opiate drug addict their pure opiates. Then when they rob your house two hours later for money for street heroin and accidentally run over your child backing out with your garage with your stolen car, that 140,000 USD brain surgery on your child will be a even bigger waste of tax payers dollars.

    I don't understand how you can call yourself professionals and be so judgmental of people different from you. A customer is not breaking any laws by refusing to take their prescribed anti-biotics with their prescribed opiates. We are not judges that engage in condescending speculation based on soft evidence. Why would you go into healthcare if you are not capable of feeling empathy for humanity? Power tripping pharmacists. I'm sure you are the same type of pharmacist that refuses to give out clean needles to addicts helping spread HIV and hepatitis in your own communities.
    A customer who deceives their prescriber in order to get opiates is breaking the law. I know an ex-heroin addict with a dozen unneccessary fillings because they figured out that if they told a dentist "this tooth hurts" enough times, they would get Vicodin. A clue that this may be happening is failure to fill the antibiotic prescription. We are expected to deny service based on hints or clues. If you sell 3.6g of pseudoephedrine along with instant cold ice packs, iodine, boxes of matches and acetone-based nail polish remover to someone every week you will lose your license for saying "well, I never SAW the meth lab."
     
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    BidingMyTime

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    Why is this a problem? I always let customer pick up whatever they want. If I force them to pick up all their prescriptions or nothing, they may refuse to pick up any and that's multiple scripts lost for the pharmacy or worse, bring all their business elsewhere that will fill whatever they want. Letting them choose at least gives me the business of the few scripts he wants to pick up. Besides, even if they pick up all the prescriptions, they may choose not to take them anyway..

    It's just as Zelman explained. The fact that the customer is not filling their antibiotic is evidence that they weren't prescribed the narcotic for a legitimate medical reason, which means how will you explain to the DEA that you met their requirement for only filling narcotics written for a legitimate medical reason?

    It has nothing to do with "power-tripping", I hate having to play police-officer, but the DEA *requires* that narcotic prescriptions only be filled if they meet certain requirements, 1 of which is that they are written for a legitimate medical reason in the legitimate course of a prescriber/patient relationship.

    So, yes, I would call the doctor.....FYI, I've never had a doctor say "oh, that's OK, go ahead and fill the Norco", because the prescriber is also aware of the DEA requirements for their writing narcotics, so the prescriber invariably says that the patient must get the antiobiotic or they will just out and out cancel the narcotic RX.
     
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    lane one

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    "we might as well give every addict just a buffet of narcotics to hopefully prevent any type of criminal behavior in the future"

    I support this.

    Can we petition for this guy to never be licensed? The thought of you on the bench is terrifying.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    Your solution is providing greater access? Why do you think prescription drug abuse results in more deaths per year than heroin and cocaine combined? Is it because they are pharmaceutical grade products that are safer? No, it's because they are more accessible. Yet I am the bad guy for trying to reduce the accessibility of these drugs for people who have the intent to abuse? Your kidding right?

    You don't treat heroin addiction by providing heroin. You treat the addiction by breaking both the physical and psychological dependence.



    Waste resources? The "patient" is wasting resources by abusing the medical system for drug abuse. I'm not judgemental. The doctor doesn't know if the patient is abusing the system or not. The intentions become clear when they are in and out of an urgent care every month with narcotic scripts and never pick up their antibiotic. It is my job to dispense drugs for legitimate medical need, evaluating the situation and fulfilling this obligation does not make me judgemental.
    Your solution is providing greater access?
    Yes

    Why do you think prescription drug abuse results in more deaths per year than heroin and cocaine combined?
    More deaths in absolute numbers. You are misrepresenting the data. But we are talking deaths per a user/capita. There are much more prescription drug users than heroin or cocaine users therefore their total death numbers are much greater. However per a user, Heroin and cocaine deaths are much greater.

    Yet I am the bad guy for trying to reduce the accessibility of these drugs for people who have the intent to abuse? Your kidding right?
    I was responding more to the condescending and negative attitude that was displayed above and how people were assuming individuals are addicts for just taking the pain meds when they are sick which is a ridiculous assumption. Opiate addicts are mentally ill not criminals.

    You don't treat heroin addiction by providing heroin. You treat the addiction by breaking both the physical and psychological dependence.
    I agree that supply does create some demand. However it is disproportionately demand that creates supply and demand for opiates can not be reduced greatly. The realistic solution is to provide pure heroin in a safe environment for addicts. Ideally it would be nice to break psychological and physical dependence but when you have worked with as many addicts as I have you come to realize this idealized cure is not pragmatic.

    Yes we will create some number of new opiate addicts by legalizing heroin for drug users to use in a controlled environment. However this harm will be greatly offset by the significantly reduced amount of deaths from illicit opiate use. Between 10,000 and 30,000 people die from unregulated heroin use every year in the US. I will gladly trade those deaths for another 5,000 opiate addicts per a year.


    The "patient" is wasting resources by abusing the medical system for drug abuse. I'm not judgemental. The doctor doesn't know if the patient is abusing the system or not. The intentions become clear when they are in and out of an urgent care every month with narcotic scripts and never pick up their antibiotic. It is my job to dispense drugs for legitimate medical need, evaluating the situation and fulfilling this obligation does not make me judgemental.
    I don't understand how you can be so sure the patient is abusing the pain meds based on their past history of only taking the opiate and not the antibiotic. The pain meds can help out with symptoms of being sick, sometimes more than an antibiotic. I don't see how this action, even repeated, paint a picture of a serious opiate addict.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    A customer who deceives their prescriber in order to get opiates is breaking the law. I know an ex-heroin addict with a dozen unneccessary fillings because they figured out that if they told a dentist "this tooth hurts" enough times, they would get Vicodin. A clue that this may be happening is failure to fill the antibiotic prescription. We are expected to deny service based on hints or clues. If you sell 3.6g of pseudoephedrine along with instant cold ice packs, iodine, boxes of matches and acetone-based nail polish remover to someone every week you will lose your license for saying "well, I never SAW the meth lab."

    Acetone isn't commonly used in I2 and red phosphorus synthesis of methamphetamine but I agree I would flag that action. Also havn't see much psudeo bought since they put the binders in the pill that make it hard to convert to ephedrine. My issue is how you see someone failing to fill the antibiotic and only the opiate as an illegal action. I would not flag that behavior. The pain meds can help with illness in different ways than an antibiotic
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    It's just as Zelman explained. The fact that the customer is not filling their antibiotic is evidence that they weren't prescribed the narcotic for a legitimate medical reason, which means how will you explain to the DEA that you met their requirement for only filling narcotics written for a legitimate medical reason?

    It has nothing to do with "power-tripping", I hate having to play police-officer, but the DEA *requires* that narcotic prescriptions only be filled if they meet certain requirements, 1 of which is that they are written for a legitimate medical reason in the legitimate course of a prescriber/patient relationship.

    So, yes, I would call the doctor.....FYI, I've never had a doctor say "oh, that's OK, go ahead and fill the Norco", because the prescriber is also aware of the DEA requirements for their writing narcotics, so the prescriber invariably says that the patient must get the antiobiotic or they will just out and out cancel the narcotic RX.

    The fact that the customer is not filling their antibiotic is evidence that they weren't prescribed the narcotic for a legitimate medical reason
    I disagree this is hard evidence that they weren't prescribed the opiate for a legitimate medical reason. Perhaps I gave patients a larger margin of error for what I consider criminal abuse / fraud but a patient just talking the pain med and not the AB for a diagnosed bacteria infection does not scream opiate abuse to me. To me it says that the patient simply finds that the pain med helps them more with their symptoms or that maybe they are religious don't believe in antibiotics.

    If you truly think a patient is abusing opiates you should report them regardless of if they take the AB with the opiates. Even if they are getting AB with the opiates it is still opiate abuse under your line of thinking. To me not taking the AB is a trivial decision that does not add any criminality.
     

    Sine Cura

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    It would be better if they would not waste my pharmacy's time to process all their "acute" scripts for which they presented hard copies, and then just pick up the opioid because they don't have enough money and are paying cash, claiming they will pick up the rest later (AND THEY NEVER DO).
     

    zelman

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    The fact that the customer is not filling their antibiotic is evidence that they weren't prescribed the narcotic for a legitimate medical reason
    I disagree this is hard evidence that they weren't prescribed the opiate for a legitimate medical reason.
    THERE. IS. NO. HARD. EVIDENCE. IN. RETAIL. PHARMACY.

    You CANNOT require a standard of evidence that does not exist. I've said this a dozen times on SDN: "I often have no proof that a patient is a real person." Do you think I can get hard evidence of anything else when the person who picks up prescriptions for their sick neighbor may have fabricated the person to begin with?

    Perhaps I gave patients a larger margin of error for what I consider criminal abuse / fraud but a patient just talking the pain med and not the AB for a diagnosed bacteria infection does not scream opiate abuse to me. To me it says that the patient simply finds that the pain med helps them more with their symptoms or that maybe they are religious don't believe in antibiotics.
    If a heroin addict is given the choice between daptomycin for their endocarditis and 1 kg of 100% pure heroin, they will not take the antibiotic. Ever. THAT DOES NOT MAKE IT OKAY FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS TO GIVE THEM WHAT THEY "[find] helps them more with their symptoms".
    If you truly think a patient is abusing opiates you should report them regardless of if they take the AB with the opiates. Even if they are getting AB with the opiates it is still opiate abuse under your line of thinking.
    A patient participating in a complete treatment plan is not the same as the one who wants opioids and nothing else.
    To me not taking the AB is a trivial decision that does not add any criminality.
    Wrong. 100% wrong. I hope someone who makes the trivial decision of not taking antibiotics gives you TB and you realize how wrong you are.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    THERE. IS. NO. HARD. EVIDENCE. IN. RETAIL. PHARMACY.

    You CANNOT require a standard of evidence that does not exist. I've said this a dozen times on SDN: "I often have no proof that a patient is a real person." Do you think I can get hard evidence of anything else when the person who picks up prescriptions for their sick neighbor may have fabricated the person to begin with?


    There is plenty of cases with hard evidence. Counterfeit prescriptions scanned and printed on computer paper. Or my personal fav. a deranged opiate addict comes in and tells me they gave the last pharmacist a script for opiates and told them to come back in two hours. Then we check the camera and find out that is not what happened.
     

    zelman

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    There is plenty of cases with hard evidence. Counterfeit prescriptions scanned and printed on computer paper. Or my personal fav. a deranged opiate addict comes in and tells me they gave the last pharmacist a script for opiates and told them to come back in two hours. Then we check the camera and find out that is not what happened.
    Case 1: I've gotten those as "legitimate" prescriptions. One was a prescriber who (b&w) photocopied their last prescription blank and didn't notice that it said "void unless background is blue color" on it. I've also gotten prescriptions that listed "watermark" as a security feature but the "watermark" was a printed background and not an actual watermark. Both cases were confirmed to be issued by the prescriber.

    Case 2: If they came through a drive thru at any store where I've had to review security footage, there would be no way to tell.
     

    ldiot

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    There is plenty of cases with hard evidence. Counterfeit prescriptions scanned and printed on computer paper. Or my personal fav. a deranged opiate addict comes in and tells me they gave the last pharmacist a script for opiates and told them to come back in two hours. Then we check the camera and find out that is not what happened.

    If every case had hard evidence (or proof) the term professional judgement wouldn't exist. Everything would be decided by protocol. In reality every case is different and in every case the pharmacists has to determine what they are comfortable with and what course of action is most appropriate.

    You can't prove that the 10 people who came in to buy the exact same brand of Sudafed within the last hour are making meth or working together. You don't have proof but you have a piece of evidence. This evidence must be used in order to make a decision.

    Same goes with the patient who gets their Norco stolen every month. Same goes with the patient who never picks up their Antibiotic. You have to use you brain. Their is rarely proof, there is rarely hard evidence, but there is always information that must be taken into consideration.
     

    owlegrad

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    Since when do pharmacists dispense narcotics as long as there is no hard evidence of criminality? I don't think that has even been the standard, lol
     
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    gwarm01

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    Can we petition for this guy to never be licensed? The thought of you on the bench is terrifying.
    Oh, don't worry. He's just a hardcore anti-pharmacist pharmacy student. I like his shtick. He'll come around.
     

    boriqua

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    realistically speaking, would any regulating body really give you **** that you didn't force the patient to pick up the antibiotic?
     

    zelman

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    realistically speaking, would any regulating body really give you **** that you didn't force the patient to pick up the antibiotic?
    As one part of a many-part case, yes.
     

    Humble Sloth

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    how many cases have you heard of where a pharmacist was reprimanded for that
    Zero bc he's wrong and full of doodoo. There is nothing wrong with a patient not taking all their prescribed meds. It's called low patient compliance and it's common in the medical world.
     
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    zelman

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    how many cases have you heard of where a pharmacist was reprimanded for that
    Sorry. I meant a criminal case against the patient. Not the pharmacist.
     

    ldiot

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    realistically speaking, would any regulating body really give you **** that you didn't force the patient to pick up the antibiotic?

    It's not really about what some regulating body thinks, I don't feel like handing out narcs to people who have gamed the system and I also don't like wasting my time filling antibiotics and then returning them to stock because 1 dollar is too expensive.
     

    boriqua

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    It's not really about what some regulating body thinks, I don't feel like handing out narcs to people who have gamed the system and I also don't like wasting my time filling antibiotics and then returning them to stock because 1 dollar is too expensive.

    if you try to force the patient to take both meds, and they end up taking nothing, wouldn't you be wasting your time filling both scripts and returning them to stock?
     
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    Dr Wario

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    if you try to force the patient to take both meds, and they end up taking nothing, wouldn't you be wasting your time filling both scripts and returning them to stock?

    You waste those few minutes of time but you save yourself in the future when they don't come back every month and try it again.
     
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    ldiot

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    Double post
     
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    ldiot

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    if you try to force the patient to take both meds, and they end up taking nothing, wouldn't you be wasting your time filling both scripts and returning them to stock?

    Why should I care if they take their norco or not? It does nothing to treat the infection and they probably don't even have an infection to begin with. I already have to waste my time returning their antibiotic so what''s the difference? But trust me... nobody is going to have me return their norco anyways.
     

    boriqua

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    Why should I care if they take their norco or not? It does nothing to treat the infection and they probably don't even have an infection to begin with. I already have to waste my time returning their antibiotic so what''s the difference? But trust me... nobody is going to have me return their norco anyways.

    i think it would waste a lot more time and energy explaining to the patient whatever reason you come up with that they must pick up the antibiotic and the narcotic or else they can't get neither and listening to whatever BS story they come up with about how they must have the narcotic, then bickering back and forth. I'd rather just tell a tech to return the antibiotic back to stock.
     
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    mentos

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    This happens all the time and it's obvious that they are drug seeking addicts. Whoever thinks we're power tripping doesn't work as a retail pharmacist.

    Me to Pt: You just picked up oxycodone yesterday, is the doctor aware of this?
    Pt: Yes I told him.
    Me: I will have to call him to make sure it's okay to fill this Norco.
    Pt: I told him, he knows. You don't have to call him. Blah blah blah.

    Me to MD: This pt picked up oxy yesterday, should I still fill the Norco?
    MD: LoL he didn't tell me he was taking that. Cancel the Norco. He can have the antibiotic.

    Me to Pt: The doctor voided the Norco. He said to only fill the antibiotic.
    Pt: Yells profanities at me for a few minutes then finally decides to leave. Doesn't care about the antibiotic. Never comes back again!

    If a normal working class person went to the ER, it would cost them hundreds of dollars. These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix. What a waste of resources.
     
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    Humble Sloth

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    This happens all the time and it's obvious that they are drug seeking addicts. Whoever thinks we're power tripping doesn't work as a retail pharmacist.

    Me to Pt: You just picked up oxycodone yesterday, is the doctor aware of this?
    Pt: Yes I told him.
    Me: I will have to call him to make sure it's okay to fill this Norco.
    Pt: I told him, he knows. You don't have to call him. Blah blah blah.

    Me to MD: This pt picked up oxy yesterday, should I still fill the Norco?
    MD: LoL he didn't tell me he was taking that. Cancel the Norco. He can have the antibiotic.

    Me to Pt: The doctor voided the Norco. He said to only fill the antibiotic.
    Pt: Yells profanities at me for a few minutes then finally decides to leave. Doesn't care about the antibiotic. Never comes back again!

    If a normal working class person went to the ER, it would cost them hundreds of dollars. These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix. What a waste of resources.

    "These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix"

    I wonder if you would use the same disgustingly abrasive, condescendingly ignorant language towards substance dependent individuals if they were your son, daughter, brother, sister, mother or cousin.

    These people are economic and societal victims. They have been mentally, emotionally and physically abused and ostracized a million times, a hundred different ways we can not even comprehend. No one wakes up and says, "Today I want to become an opiate addict because I love stealing from what little family and friends I have. I love preforming sexual acts on dirty, dark, dilapidated alleyways."

    Perhaps one day when you mature a little you will realize that no means of measure should define our limitless love for humanity and will understand how anyone's life circumstances can flip in mere weeks. If you want to unceremoniously judge people you should go into law enforcement or the military. Healthcare is not a good fit for you.
     
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    mentos

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    Omg you're serious? Yes, I'm not mature enough to fill C2s for this guy everyday and lose my license. Someday I will be mature enough to do this and not be able to provide fot my family. Then the addict will show me his limitless love for humanity.
     
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    boriqua

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    This happens all the time and it's obvious that they are drug seeking addicts. Whoever thinks we're power tripping doesn't work as a retail pharmacist.

    Me to Pt: You just picked up oxycodone yesterday, is the doctor aware of this?
    Pt: Yes I told him.
    Me: I will have to call him to make sure it's okay to fill this Norco.
    Pt: I told him, he knows. You don't have to call him. Blah blah blah.

    Me to MD: This pt picked up oxy yesterday, should I still fill the Norco?
    MD: LoL he didn't tell me he was taking that. Cancel the Norco. He can have the antibiotic.

    Me to Pt: The doctor voided the Norco. He said to only fill the antibiotic.
    Pt: Yells profanities at me for a few minutes then finally decides to leave. Doesn't care about the antibiotic. Never comes back again!

    If a normal working class person went to the ER, it would cost them hundreds of dollars. These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix. What a waste of resources.

    umm, that is a 100% different situation then what we are discussing right now. obviously if the patient JUST picked up another narcotic the day before, we are not gonna give him another one today. the situation was that the patient brought in 2 scripts. 1 for norco and 1 for antibiotic and he didn't want to pay for the antibiotic and just wanted to pay for norco with no conflicting narcotic on record or the PMP
     

    mentos

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    umm, that is a 100% different situation then what we are discussing right now. obviously if the patient JUST picked up another narcotic the day before, we are not gonna give him another one today. the situation was that the patient brought in 2 scripts. 1 for norco and 1 for antibiotic and he didn't want to pay for the antibiotic and just wanted to pay for norco with no conflicting narcotic on record or the PMP

    OP said patient profile is litered with various pain meds in past couple years...
     

    boriqua

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    OP said patient profile is litered with various pain meds in past couple years...

    dont believe that translates to CONFLICTING narcotics on record. "various pain meds in past couple of years" could mean oxy 3 months ago, perco 5 months ago, tramadol 7 months ago, morphine last year, etc. etc. if you telling me the patient got these various pain meds in the past couple of weeks from different doctors and different pharmacies, then we have something to talk about
     

    zelman

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    "These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix"

    I wonder if you would use the same disgustingly abrasive, condescendingly ignorant language towards substance dependent individuals if they were your son, daughter, brother, sister, mother or cousin.
    Would and have.
    These people are economic and societal victims. They have been mentally, emotionally and physically abused and ostracized a million times, a hundred different ways we can not even comprehend. No one wakes up and says, "Today I want to become an opiate addict because I love stealing from what little family and friends I have. I love preforming sexual acts on dirty, dark, dilapidated alleyways."
    That argument could be made for any piece of human garbage. "Hitler was a product of his society. How can we blame him?" or "They may have raped and murdered a few dozen toddlers, but they were molested as a child, so they are precious and should be absolved."
    Perhaps one day when you mature a little you will realize that no means of measure should define our limitless love for humanity and will understand how anyone's life circumstances can flip in mere weeks. If you want to unceremoniously judge people you should go into law enforcement or the military. Healthcare is not a good fit for you.
    Healthcare is not a good fit for the DEA. But, that's the reality of the situation. Law enforcement is party to the patient/pharmacist/provider relationship, and they have all the power. We need to play by their rules. Not your opinion of what is just.
     
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    ldiot

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    "These leeches of society pay nothing to get their fix"

    I wonder if you would use the same disgustingly abrasive, condescendingly ignorant language towards substance dependent individuals if they were your son, daughter, brother, sister, mother or cousin.

    These people are economic and societal victims. They have been mentally, emotionally and physically abused and ostracized a million times, a hundred different ways we can not even comprehend. No one wakes up and says, "Today I want to become an opiate addict because I love stealing from what little family and friends I have. I love preforming sexual acts on dirty, dark, dilapidated alleyways."

    Perhaps one day when you mature a little you will realize that no means of measure should define our limitless love for humanity and will understand how anyone's life circumstances can flip in mere weeks. If you want to unceremoniously judge people you should go into law enforcement or the military. Healthcare is not a good fit for you.

    Is bringing McDonald's to a 500 pound person whenever they ask an act of compassion that demonstrates love for humanity? I know I certainly wouldn't deliver fast food to one of my family members if they were 500 pounds and bed ridden, just as I would refuse to enable their opiate addiction.

    Sometimes the true act of compassion is saying no. You are not doing anyone a favor by providing narcotics to a drug abuser, in fact you are personally responsible for enabling them. Your intentions may be good but you are really throwing more gas on the fire.

    Also, you do realize that is a koala bear in your picture and not a sloth right? :eyebrow:
     
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