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I'm "OTHER". Definition of Minority?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Ms.DNA, Nov 10, 2000.

  1. Ms.DNA

    Ms.DNA Junior Member

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    I consider my self Filipino, although my father is Filipino and my mother is American Irish. What am I considered in the eyes of the admission committee? I don't like calling my self "Other" even though I am one. So, what do you think I should put? Am I a considered an minority as a mistiso (half Filipino)?
    Ms.DNA
     
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  3. alexcc_ms

    alexcc_ms Member
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    That's mestizo.
    If whitey has systematically discriminated against you then you're a minority. What's your last name? If it's Smith you probably don't qualify.
     
  4. gower

    gower 1K Member
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    There is an "official" definition of minority for the purpose of admission to medical school:

    Native American (aka American Indian) and native Alaskan

    African-American (aka black)

    Mexican-American

    Mainland Puerto Rican

    You are apparently "other"

    "Minority" does not simply mean proportion in US population.
     
  5. vietcongs

    vietcongs Senior Member
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    The AMA's official definition of minority stinks because I dont think that it is fair to lump all Asians into one big overrepresented group as the AMA does. Chinese and Indians are not minorities in the medicine, however there are many other groups of disadvantaged asians that are underrepresented in medicine such as cambodians, vietnamese, laotians, etc., and the AMA shouldnt only look at the proportions of 2 overrepresented asian groups, therefore disqualifying all the rest of us from counting as minorities. What do you all think?
     
  6. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor
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    Then let's make sure that among Caucasian med students we have 10% of German-origin, 13% of French-origin, 11% of Swiss-origin...

    Why stop there?

    Let's make sure that we have 2% of Caucasian students of English-origin who are from Cromwell Road in the Chelsea section of London...

    If you're Cambodian, hey guess what? You're Asian. If you're Laotian, hey guess what? You're Asian too.

    Just like Colombians, the Spanish, the Portugese, Brazilians, and even Mexicans are all considered Hispanic.

    Get your grades, apply, and if you're qualified you'll get in. The infamous "White Man" isn't keeping you down. Sheesh.


    Tim of New York CIty.
     
  7. alexcc_ms

    alexcc_ms Member
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    First, I go to COMP and there are ALOT of vietnamese at my school.
    Next, turtleboard and cobragirl are both wrong. It's real easy for white people to say discrimination doesn't exist. They are rarely victims of it and when they do it themselves they may not even realize it.
    Most of my fellow Texans that attend COMP are minorities, we couldn't get accepted in TX. This isn't about plights of the past, it's about opportunities of today and tommorow.
    Anyway, Ms. DNA I guess you don't want to give your last name on the net. So if you consider yourself a minority and want to claim minority status then choose asian. That's what most mainstream Americans would consider a Filipino (sp?).
     
  8. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor
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    Alex,

    I'm Chinese, and in case that doesn't ring a bell, that would also mean I'm Asian.

    Have I experienced discrimination and prejudice in my life? Growing up in New York City and spending much time as a child on Long Island, I guess maybe not as much as an Asian in the middle of Wyoming, but it does exist. I can't argue with that fact at all.

    I believe the admissions process looks for qualified individuals and rarely, rarely gives handouts to any particular group. Most AdComs will assess the applicant on more than just numbers and the color of his skin.

    Stop whining. It's time for all groups to stop pointing fingers and blaming someone else for their perceived problems. Do well in college, do well on the MCATs, and do well in life. And if you've done all that, you should have no trouble in getting into med school despite the infamous "White Man."

    Cobragirl is right in that all groups that entered America were persecuted at some point. In New York alone it was the Germans who were screwed over. Then came the Irish, and the Germans let loose on them. Then came the Italians and both the Germans and Irish went medieval on them! It's a never-ending cycle and it won't stop with you just because you're part of a minority group.

    Study hard,

    Tim of New York City.
     
  9. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor
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    In my research into Affirmative Action laws, I believe that the only way a self-proclaimed person of Hispanic/Latino/Chicano origin can benefit from the programs is if his last name is of Hispanic/Latino/Chicano origin.

    So even though your husband is technically half Mexican, his last name isn't and that could present a problem in Affirmative Action programs.


    Tim of New York City.
     
  10. jcollings

    jcollings Member
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    Go cobragirl!
    Go turtleboard!

    May the most qualified on the basis of numbers and performance be admitted. Ethnicity shouldn't be a factor in the admission process. Some of the individuals posting on this thread are obviously under the impression that being able to call oneself an underprivileged minority will prove advantageous in the application cycle. If not, why be concerned about such status? Sure, as I have probably already been labeled, I am considered caucasian. However, my great-grandfather came to this grand nation in 1910. He spoke no English, had not a dime to his name, and worked in a wheat field in the midwest for a subpar wage.

    Cobragirl said it when she said Heinz 57. The beauty is that every citizen in our nation represents relativley recent immigration. We live in a culture of unparalleled diversity. Remember, our nation is a very young one.

    May we find strength in diversity. The potential within our culture will only be completely tapped when all people come together. I hope we can someday overcome the obstacles that 'being different' seems to hurl in our paths.

    I could care less what my physician's race is. If I am someday in need of care by several physicians, specialists etc., I will certainly not be concerned with the representation of races within the group. Their academic backgrounds and professional track records will be at the top of my list.

    I'm sorry, but I just cannot fathom aggreeing with the fact that admission to medical school should be easier for an underprivileged minority. A so-called underprivileged minority will have already received a college education by the time he or she matriculates. I hardly consider being privileged enough to finish college 'underprivileged.'

    I am in the same boat as Cobragirl. I have borrowed an immense amount of money to finish college, and I am married, etc. Should we be able to check a box for 'nontraditional, older than average, married' applicants?... and be granted any favortism? I think not!!

    [This message has been edited by jcollings (edited 11-20-2000).]
     
  11. alexcc_ms

    alexcc_ms Member
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    This thread is getting ridiculous. With people who quote not wanting to be quoted. And everyone having an opinion on what 'should be'. Things are the way they are. AA wasn't put in place to give unfair advantages to individuals. It's reparations, a leveling of the playing field if you will.
    You can't just steal a man's land or make him your slave, then after you've proffited and he has nothing say. Oops, sorry... we're even now right. He needs land to grow his food or he'll be forever in your debt. How is that even?
    And as for a blonde with a great figure, I'm sure she'll have a much harder time getting into medical school than a black or hispanic guy who speaks poor english because certain sectors of society refuse to provide an equal public education.
    Grow up, just because the programs exist doesn't mean we all get free educations. In fact because I'm hispanic I have to pay $80,000 more than my fellow texans (many of whom had lower MCAT's & GPA's) SHOULDN'T my superior scores have gotten me in? It doesn't matter. The admissions commitees regardless of what they SHOULD do get to grade on intangible qualities (that prejudice little spectrophotometer that they learned in the fifties.)
    Hey, how many of you were interviewed by black or hispanic interviewers? How 'bout american indians?
    The only reason I'm in medical school is cuz I got a descent public education, which I would not have received if my parents didn't get government jobs in a nice neighborhood. So while I didn't get a free ride in college or into medical school. Those old programs paid off the way they were meant to. It's trickle down. As a physician and future philanthropist I will be able to help more of 'my' people out of the cotton fields and into the professions via a descent education.
    Who's public schools are the poorest in the nation. I mean on average. That's the way speak about society, not on a case by case basis. I guarantee you at least 80% of the poorest schools are predominantly black, hispanic, and american indian. But you say, we all have the same opportunities?
    Get out of lala land, take a sociology course, for criminey's sake.

     
  12. Ms.DNA

    Ms.DNA Junior Member

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    Listen, I didn't mean to start a full fledge argument on minorities and AA. I just wanted some feedback on how people are struggling with the whole classification of ethnicity, especially if you are a mix like me. To be honest, I was not looking for the opinion of so called Caucasians, only because you can not relate. I just do not want to ignore part of myself by checking off "white" because this is not my identity. I really had no intention of trying to "fit" into an under represented minority group so that I can "reap" the benefits, as many of you out there think minorities do. I just wanted some advice on where, those of you who are in the same situation, do I fit as far as the box and in the eyes of the admission office. Lets all get off our little soapboxes and stop judging each other. By the way, I have a very typical "Spanish" last name alexcc, so people always think I'm Spanish and not Filipino.
     
  13. Cobragirl

    Cobragirl Hoohaa helper ;)
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    I have deleted my previous posts in the hopes that this thread can get back to the original question...and my answer to you, Ms.DNA, is that if you don't "identify" yourself as a "caucasian", then your choice should be obvious to you....mark Asian.

     

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