sparkplug

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I was wondering how long you required to stay in service after you finish your IM residency to apply to IM subspecialty in the Navy? How about the acceptance rate?

Thanks
 

Gastrapathy

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I was wondering how long you required to stay in service after you finish your IM residency to apply to IM subspecialty in the Navy? How about the acceptance rate?

Thanks
You can apply for fellowship while still a resident. Some people do manage to go straight from residency to fellowship. It depends on need, the profile of the other applicants (if any), residency performance and subspecialty choice. If you aren't selected, you do 2-3 years of a utilization tour before you apply back. If you don't get it at that point, there is probably something wrong with your application.
 

DrMetal

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If you don't get it at that point, there is probably something wrong with your application.
Little curious at to what you mean here. Do you mean there's something logistically wrong with your application, or you're just not competitive enough for said supspec? If you're shooting for something competitive, like say the 1 endocrin spot in the Navy, it's conceivable that even a re-applicant wont get it, right? Then what, worth applying for a 3rd time, or best to just move on?
 

Gastrapathy

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Little curious at to what you mean here. Do you mean there's something logistically wrong with your application, or you're just not competitive enough for said supspec? If you're shooting for something competitive, like say the 1 endocrin spot in the Navy, it's conceivable that even a re-applicant wont get it, right? Then what, worth applying for a 3rd time, or best to just move on?
Most of the people who want a fellowship will get it after residency or after their first utilization tour. If someone isn't selected at either point, he/she needs to evaluate why that happened. Some of the people in that position are unlikely to ever get selected. Others just ran into bad timing twice-over.

There is always some flexibility, with selecting for future years and outservice training. So, if two great applicants both apply to Allergy the same year, they can give one for this year and one for next year. This is good for these two applicants but can have implications the next time around.

Endocrine is noncompetitive in civilian medicine. If someone isn't selected that first time around, he will usually bail and do it as a civilian rather than wait for a Navy slot that might not ever come.

There are some people who keep applying and eventually wear the system down and get into a competitive fellowship. But, multiple failures to select should be a clue.
 

SeminoleFan3

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Does a fellowship immediately after residency add to your total commitment time?
 

Gastrapathy

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Yes, it is year for year for everything after residency.
Not exactly. Inservice fellowships are treated the same as inservice residencies for obligation (additive to residency obligation but not to pre-GME obligation). So, for an inservice fellowship, whether it adds to your obligation depends on the length of your current pre-GME obligation (ROTC, USUHS, HPSP, etc). FTOS is additive to either.
 

DrMetal

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Not exactly. Inservice fellowships are treated the same as inservice residencies for obligation (additive to residency obligation but not to pre-GME obligation). So, for an inservice fellowship, whether it adds to your obligation depends on the length of your current pre-GME obligation (ROTC, USUHS, HPSP, etc). FTOS is additive to either.
What do you do for the 1-year GI fellowships (endoscopy, hep, etc)? Does the Navy have 'em, or do you have to go FTOS?
 

Gastrapathy

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What do you do for the 1-year GI fellowships (endoscopy, hep, etc)? Does the Navy have 'em, or do you have to go FTOS?
There are a number of so-called fourth year fellowships (advanced endoscopy, transplant hepatology, IBD, motility, nutrition, etc). Only transplant hepatology leads to an additional board certification. The first two are the only ones that I'm aware of anyone in the Navy doing. Whether they are available is highly variable and, usually, you have to already be staff. Most people want to just practice after PGY6.