in state out of state wtf?

Discussion in 'Pre-Pharmacy' started by Da Alchemist, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. Da Alchemist

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    Im supposed to be starting my prepharm this fall, here in East coast. but now im having second thoughts. I always see the instate and out of state tuition when I look at the finance list. My only target for pharm school after prepharm is California no where else. So should I do my prepharm in Cali so i can be a resident and after prepharm i will be considered as instate student? Im kinda confused about that whole instate out of state tuition thing. Does anyone know anything about this?
     
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  3. Jack555

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    Go to the UCSF Pharmacy website and look for information on what qualifies as in-state.


    Some very basics I know of is that it deals with

    -What State you submit taxes too.
    -If you are your parents dependent, you live in Cali and they live in a different state you may not be eligible even though you live/have lived in cali
    -drivers license
    -where your register to vote
    -etc

    Check UCSD's website if you don't find anything. I know I've seen stuff on it.
     
  4. gtpederson

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    Something I wish I knew when I was starting, and if you don't know could cause some problems:
    As far as I know, FAFSA still considers you a dependent of your parents until the age of 25. (Even if you were an idiot and moved out at 18 like I did)
     
  5. eelo

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    We found that on the Student Status page, there are a series of yes/no questions. you have to be able to answer Yes to at least one of those questions in order to be considered an independent student. The most likely one for Pharm students is the one about getting a professional degree.
     
  6. Da Alchemist

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    im 21 and live with my parents right now but i have my own taxes and medical insurance. am i considered dependent still because i live with them?
     
  7. RX student

    RX student NSU-WPB campus
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    The main reason is your age. Until you are 25, you are considered a dependent, regardless of your living arrangements.
     
  8. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    You're considered a dependent if they contribute more than 50% to your support finanacially.

    For CA, you need to demonstrate one year of CA residence. If your parents live here, as in the case of my kids....its no problem being a dependent. If your parents don't live here, then it becomes more of an issue.
     
  9. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    OK - I pulled out a UC application booklet I've got in the house & the rules are very clear:

    "To be considered a CA resident for the purpose of fees, an out of state student must have lived in Ca for more than one year preceding the residence determination date, relinquish residence in other states, show an intent to establish residency in CA & demonstrate financial independence.

    Unmarried undergrads from other states qualify as financially independent if they were not claimed by their parents or others as dependents for tax purposes for two preceding tax years & if their annual income is sufficient to meet their needs. All married students & unmarried graduate & professional students from other states qualify as financially independent if their parents or others have not claimed them as dependents for tax purposes for the preceding year.

    Other out of state students who qualify as financially independent include: veterans of the US armed services; students with legal dependents other than a spouse; students with both parents deceased; students who are wards of the court; and students who are at least 24 years of age by Dec 31 of the year they seek to be classifed as residents."

    There are other stipulations with regard to visas etc....pm me if you need to know more. Does this help?
     
  10. RX student

    RX student NSU-WPB campus
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    I have lived on my own since I was 18. I have worked and my parents didn't contribute anything, but according to FAFSA I still had to list my parent's income b/c I was under the age of 25. I talked to everyone over the phone trying to get this changed b/c my parents file an extension and I could never fill out the FAFSA before the deadline...so I could never get anything not even HOPE (in Georgia, it's financial aid for those w/ 3.0 GPA or higher). They gave me some bullcrap explanation, stating that until you are 25, your parents should contribute financially. The year I finally turned 25, they said I made too much money to qualify for anything but loans.
     
  11. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    Qualifying for in state fees is a different issue than FAFSA. One is a state determined eligibility & the other is for federal loans.
     
  12. sleazye

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    FAFSA considered me a dependent until I turned 23 even though my mom hadn't supported me for years. After that I was eligible to start getting grants and subsidized loans. Many states require you to live there a year and pay taxes there to be considered a resident. Some schools won't give you in state tuition if you have moved to that state within a year of starting school because they think you moved there for school without the intention of becoming a resident. I would say contact the individual schools you are interested in as their requirements may vary.
     
  13. eelo

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    Also, the FinAid section at each school should be made aware of one's personal situation. Many of you have perfect examples of why you're independent (and have been for years) but you don't meet FAFSA's definition. Contact the school and let the FinAid officers know that you're independent, you've been independent for XXX number of years, and that the FAFSA data-entry program doesn't allow for students such as yourself to describe or identify their independence. The FinAid officers already know that FAFSA doesn't do this, but if you get in there and tell them exactly why you should be classified as an independent student, you may get some additional consideration.
     
  14. Farmercyst

    Farmercyst From the shadows
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    It also depends on where you plan to apply, unless you get in to UCSF or UCSD it won't matter because all the other schools are private schools and the tuition will be the same regardless. For your chances to be even decent for UCSF and UCSD you will need to be a California resident. They take non-residents but your chances are extremely diminished.
     
  15. Da Alchemist

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    I didnt know that only UCSF and UCSD are the only public pharm school in Cali? is there a site to check which is public and private? i saw the pharmschool list but it doesnt say if its public/private.
     
  16. Da Alchemist

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    so what happend? how are you paying your tuition now?
     
  17. Farmercyst

    Farmercyst From the shadows
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    The list on pharmcas is pretty good about public vs private. But yeah, UC's are the only public schools. UOP, USC, Western U, Touro, and LLU are all private. Touro and LLU are operated by religious groups (Jewish and Seventh-Day Adventists respectively) UOP's been around for awhile, don't know much about it. Western just setup their Pharm School in (pretty sure of this) 1989. LLU in 2002. USC needs no introduction.

    UCSF has been around forever + 1 day.
    UCSD been around since 2002 as well.

    That's about all the unimportant particulars.
     
  18. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    Actually...some more interesting CA school of pharmacy tidbits.

    UOP was actually founded by someone in the Methodist-Episocopal Church in 1851 & its name was California Wesleyan College. The name was changed a year later to University of the Pacific.

    It did have a medical school - but it later was incorporated into the Stanford University Medical School, but it has no affiliation with it today. The original campus was located in Santa Clara, moved to San Jose in 1871 then finally to Stockton in 1923. The dental school is in San Francisco (& law I think).

    For UCSF:

    The California College of Pharmacy (the original name) in SF was founded in 1972 & was actually part of UC Berkeley starting in 1873 (the SF campus was known as the University Hospital & what is now known as UC Davis was first known as the University Farm). It was the first college of pharmacy in the west (I guess that classifies as forever +1 day;) ) & the tenth in the US.

    The name was changed in 1934 to the College of Pharmacy of the University of California at the same time the BS degree was approved by the ACPE equivalent to replace the certification in vocational training. The graduate program leading to the MS & PhD degrees & internship in hospital pharmacy was established in 1938. The PharmD was established in 1955 & at that time, the name was changed again to maintain compliance with UC policy to the School of Pharmacy (the only UC affiliated one in the state). The clinical program was established in 1966 as an experiment & became permanent in 1969 as the final fourth year of the program.

    I'll let Zpak give you USC history. I don't know that much about Tuoro or Western & UCSD is a spinoff of the UCSF program & they have very similar academic & mission focuses.

    For Da - residency rules only apply to public schools in CA. The private ones can establish whatever residency guidelines & priorities they want.

    However - it is good to know - if you do indeed want to establish residency in CA for a graduate program, that means you'll be doing your undergrad prereqs using out of state residency. The undergrad tuition is less than graduate, but I'm not sure it would pay off in the end. However, as someone did point out - it is difficult to get into either UCSF or UCSD & you will have to be an outstanding student if you're out-of-state. This holds for any graduate program......my daughter didn't get accepted to a UC Medical school, but was accepted to 9 out of state schools - so go figure.....being a resident assures you of - nothing.
     
  19. abt04

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    only way to be independent from the parents under the age of 24 is to file it in court. or legal emancipation.. cuz i've talked to many parents who done this as well as know some students who took a while to file that they are independent. its a long process. another way to be independent from your parents is after you graduate from college, grad schools automatically look at you as financially independent.
     
  20. Da Alchemist

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    so you can't get any loans if you are under 25 if your parents are making good salary? Even if you are really independent?
     
  21. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    Sure you can. My daughter (24) is taking out lots of loans & we also support her (she is at an expensive school). Her dad & I make plenty of money.

    You're confusing FAFSA scholarship &/or subsidized money again with other issues.

    Have you talked with your parents about all this?
     
  22. RX student

    RX student NSU-WPB campus
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    When I decided to go back to school for pharmacy I worked for a cellular company in sales. I worked full-time and went to school until my last 2 semesters, when I took physics, organic chems, a&p's, and calculus. That is how I paid for my Associates degree. Last semester I started at a private college and I took out student loans, this semester I'm only taking 1 class so I paid for it with Christmas money (what a present). It's been a long process, but that is the way it had to be. I'll start at Nova in the fall!!
     

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