Jul 22, 2015
383
216
Status
Pre-Dental
I received an interview to this school and am wondering what this school is ranked among other dental schools? is it one of the easier schools to get an interview to? and how is the dental school as a whole.
 
Last edited:

2thsaver

7+ Year Member
Aug 20, 2012
178
99
Philadelphia
Status
Dental Student
I interviewed there. It was alright. I mean there were definitely schools I liked more, but I wouldn't say it was bad. Students seemed great, faculty seemed cool, decent location, but my one interviewer was a prick. I'm attending Temple at the moment and am very happy with my choice. I liked Temple a lot better. So far it has been a great experience.
 
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Incis0r

I LOVE Dental School
5+ Year Member
Aug 10, 2014
4,630
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Alterac Valley
I interviewed there. It was alright. I mean there were definitely schools I liked more, but I wouldn't say it was bad. Students seemed great, faculty seemed cool, decent location, but my one interviewer was a prick. I'm attending Temple at the moment and am very happy with my choice. I liked Temple a lot better. So far it has been a great experience.
Do you know the average number of crowns a graduating D4 @ Temple has under his belt?
 
Jun 14, 2012
288
61
Status
Dental Student
As someone graduating dental school in the spring who had the option of going to a prestigious "Ivy" or my state school (and chose the state school), let me just give you this advice:

- There are a couple of "bad" dental schools in the country, and the rest are more or less on par. Every school has strengths and weaknesses. Always choose the MOST AFFORDABLE dental school (i.e. accrue the lowest debt) and a school where you will be HAPPY TO SPEND FOUR YEARS OF YOUR LIFE. I would turn down the Ivy 100x over b/c I thoroughly enjoy where I live and I will graduate with no debt.
- In the future, most states will probably mandate a GPR/AEGD. I think it is highly more advisable for a student to plan to do a residency than to worry about "how many crowns, RCTs, extractions, etc" am I going to do. Plus, every student gets different patient pools and needs. No dental school will prepare a student to really hit the ground running after graduation. You'll be proficient in the little things, but it will take 2-3+ years to really get up to speed. I think a GPR/AEGD is a very wise investment unless you have a dentist on the other end who will be a good mentor, in which case go for it.
- You can specialize from any school. It's about the student, not the school. Get involved in EC's, do well in your classes, and boards are not difficult to pass.
- Finally, every student has a different opinion about EVERYTHING (e.g. tests, specialties, professional objectives, likes/dislikes). Never rely on what others say; in the end you have to make your own decisions.

Just my personal opinion before people start asking the same questions that are available in a plethora of old threads.
 
OP
D
Jul 22, 2015
383
216
Status
Pre-Dental
As someone graduating dental school in the spring who had the option of going to a prestigious "Ivy" or my state school (and chose the state school), let me just give you this advice:

- There are a couple of "bad" dental schools in the country, and the rest are more or less on par. Every school has strengths and weaknesses. Always choose the MOST AFFORDABLE dental school (i.e. accrue the lowest debt) and a school where you will be HAPPY TO SPEND FOUR YEARS OF YOUR LIFE. I would turn down the Ivy 100x over b/c I thoroughly enjoy where I live and I will graduate with no debt.
- In the future, most states will probably mandate a GPR/AEGD. I think it is highly more advisable for a student to plan to do a residency than to worry about "how many crowns, RCTs, extractions, etc" am I going to do. Plus, every student gets different patient pools and needs. No dental school will prepare a student to really hit the ground running after graduation. You'll be proficient in the little things, but it will take 2-3+ years to really get up to speed. I think a GPR/AEGD is a very wise investment unless you have a dentist on the other end who will be a good mentor, in which case go for it.
- You can specialize from any school. It's about the student, not the school. Get involved in EC's, do well in your classes, and boards are not difficult to pass.
- Finally, every student has a different opinion about EVERYTHING (e.g. tests, specialties, professional objectives, likes/dislikes). Never rely on what others say; in the end you have to make your own decisions.

Just my personal opinion before people start asking the same questions that are available in a plethora of old threads.
Thanks man I appreciate that thorough response. I had alot of terrible responses to this question but that was very helpful so thank you.
 

Incis0r

I LOVE Dental School
5+ Year Member
Aug 10, 2014
4,630
5,934
Alterac Valley
As someone graduating dental school in the spring who had the option of going to a prestigious "Ivy" or my state school (and chose the state school), let me just give you this advice:

- There are a couple of "bad" dental schools in the country, and the rest are more or less on par. Every school has strengths and weaknesses. Always choose the MOST AFFORDABLE dental school (i.e. accrue the lowest debt) and a school where you will be HAPPY TO SPEND FOUR YEARS OF YOUR LIFE. I would turn down the Ivy 100x over b/c I thoroughly enjoy where I live and I will graduate with no debt.
- In the future, most states will probably mandate a GPR/AEGD. I think it is highly more advisable for a student to plan to do a residency than to worry about "how many crowns, RCTs, extractions, etc" am I going to do. Plus, every student gets different patient pools and needs. No dental school will prepare a student to really hit the ground running after graduation. You'll be proficient in the little things, but it will take 2-3+ years to really get up to speed. I think a GPR/AEGD is a very wise investment unless you have a dentist on the other end who will be a good mentor, in which case go for it.
- You can specialize from any school. It's about the student, not the school. Get involved in EC's, do well in your classes, and boards are not difficult to pass.
- Finally, every student has a different opinion about EVERYTHING (e.g. tests, specialties, professional objectives, likes/dislikes). Never rely on what others say; in the end you have to make your own decisions.

Just my personal opinion before people start asking the same questions that are available in a plethora of old threads.
Would you mind sharing the names of the "bad" dental schools? You can PM me if you want to preserve confidentiality. I'd just like to know which ones since I'm applying next year and I'll steer clear of those with a bad rep.
 

2thsaver

7+ Year Member
Aug 20, 2012
178
99
Philadelphia
Status
Dental Student
Do you know the average number of crowns a graduating D4 @ Temple has under his belt?
On average about 12-15 I think. Roughly 100+ extractions, 75+ restorative, and 10+ endos. Those are the ones that stick in my head. Can't remember the other ones. Sorry!
 

2thsaver

7+ Year Member
Aug 20, 2012
178
99
Philadelphia
Status
Dental Student
If you have anymore questions about Temple, feel free to ask. I love it here. They honestly choose awesome people.
 

Incis0r

I LOVE Dental School
5+ Year Member
Aug 10, 2014
4,630
5,934
Alterac Valley
If you have anymore questions about Temple, feel free to ask. I love it here. They honestly choose awesome people.
Thank you for sharing the number of procedures!

1. Are lectures recorded/can you watch from home?
2. How are the professors? Sadistic or friendly?
3. Class relations- cooperative or cutthroat?
4. Average cost of living in surrounding areas that are safe (I know there is a problem near Temple)?
5. Why did you choose Temple?
 

2thsaver

7+ Year Member
Aug 20, 2012
178
99
Philadelphia
Status
Dental Student
Hey no problem!
1) Lectures are recorded but are not posted online until later in the day. I rarely use the recordings.
2) Profs are great, haven't had a problem with any (other than one, but she's warming up to our class).
3) Class is very cooperative. Temple chooses based on personality. Our class is full of characters and great people.
4) Depends. If you have a roommate, probably around $700/month. If not, around $1000 for something decent. Also depends if you have a studio or one bedroom. Studios will be lower than what I mentioned above.
5) I chose Temple because of its clinical curriculum (one of the best in the country), cost (cheapest American school for me being Canadian), location (Philly is a sick city), and facilities (everything is renovated and state of the art). After my interview, I could see they choose chill, intelligent people with great personalities. Holds true for my class. It's a great school. I highly recommend it!
 
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