Spookster831

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Feb 4, 2008
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Hi,

I was wondering does anyone know much about infectious disease as a specialty? I have been been thinking about it recently. I know you have to do internal medicine first and then so a fellowship and I was wondering how competitive the fellowships would be after IM? Is there any information on salaries, etc. Also, when I'm trying to match for IM should I go for a hospital with a good infectious disease department or is there no point?

thanks!
 

PeepshowJohnny

10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2007
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Infectious Disease is relatively noncompetitive since it's more a calling and you don't have people going into it to make big bucks or to get prestige *CoughCardiologycoughcough*. I think any good sized university program is going to have a decent infectious disease service and you'll get plenty of opportunity to make connections, do projects, get letters. I don't think you need to go to any powerhouse places.
 

themudphud

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Nov 30, 2008
133
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MD/PhD Student
I think the best description of ID is that it is a very scholarly specialty. Therefore it is not glamorous, lucrative or even that respected within the hospital. I think a lot of ID docs (even in large universities, e.g. where I'd at now) have to do IM clinics to pull in their full salaries. Therefore, I wouldn't skimp on where you do your IM residency. Moreover, yes ID is not very competitive, but considering that you're not going to be paid well regardless of whether you leave academia or stay, you should shoot to go to the best ID program possible to be most competitive when looking for a job.
Finally, I kid not when I say that it is a very scholarly field. The research coming out of ID is very strong. Current high impact research: e.g. HIV, HCV, HBV); up-and-coming high impact research: e.g. tropical diseases.
However, you could also argue that one can study an infectious disease without going into ID, e.g. some of the strongest HCV and HBV researchers are hepatologists.
 
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Mr hawkings

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Jul 20, 2004
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I think the competetiveness depends on where you go considering that most programs have only 2 or 3 fellowship spots available total (not per year). At least that was the case in the programs i looked at.
 

Mr hawkings

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Jul 20, 2004
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I think the best description of ID is that it is a very scholarly specialty. Therefore it is not glamorous, lucrative or even that respected within the hospital. I think a lot of ID docs (even in large universities, e.g. where I'd at now) have to do IM clinics to pull in their full salaries. Therefore, I wouldn't skimp on where you do your IM residency. Moreover, yes ID is not very competitive, but considering that you're not going to be paid well regardless of whether you leave academia or stay, you should shoot to go to the best ID program possible to be most competitive when looking for a job.
Finally, I kid not when I say that it is a very scholarly field. The research coming out of ID is very strong. Current high impact research: e.g. HIV, HCV, HBV); up-and-coming high impact research: e.g. tropical diseases.
However, you could also argue that one can study an infectious disease without going into ID, e.g. some of the strongest HCV and HBV researchers are hepatologists.
A lot of them also run basic science reserach labs within the university system. i know several that dont do any IM but they also spend about 35% of their time in lab.
 
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