Playmakur42

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Informal question for surgical residents and any practicing surgeons on here......

Over time, do the procedures become almost "easy" or "routine" due to repetition, or is there always a great deal of stress/uncertainty involved in each individual case? (I'm assuming some are routine & others are very stressful)

What are some of things that you have realized in your day to day practice of surgery that where unexpected when you originally chose this career (good or bad) ? (Broad, discussion provoking question....feel free to digress.) :smuggrin:
 

njbmd

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Playmakur42 said:
Informal question for surgical residents and any practicing surgeons on here......

Over time, do the procedures become almost "easy" or "routine" due to repetition, or is there always a great deal of stress/uncertainty involved in each individual case? (I'm assuming some are routine & others are very stressful)

What are some of things that you have realized in your day to day practice of surgery that where unexpected when you originally chose this career (good or bad) ? (Broad, discussion provoking question....feel free to digress.) :smuggrin:
Hi there,
As I have become more experienced, I have tended to believe that the procedures actually become more difficult. As my experience grows, so does my first hand knowledge of the complications of various procedures. The stress level is less but my desire for perfection is much stronger and therefore nothing is routine as I become the "go to" person for more junior residents.

One thing about surgery is that once you make a mistake, it's there forever. Anything that you cut is never the same a it was pre-cut. You have to keep your thought processes one or two steps ahead of your hands because there are decisions to be made with every move.

You cannot have a "bad" day. Once the patient is under, you have to get the job done. The excuses have to stop and you have to put everything that you can muster into your work. You just can do a halfway job and cover your tracks because of the above. The person under the drape is someone's mother, father, son or daughter. Would you want anthing less than 100% from your loved ones surgeon?

There has to be a bit of obsessive/compulsive about your personality to make a good surgeon. As you go through residency, you realize that doing well is less about technique and more about work and personal ethics. You also understand the meaning of "Surgeons are not made, they are forged" from my most brilliant professor RS.

njbmd :)
 

automaton

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eloquently stated. agree with above.
 

geekgirl

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njbmd said:
Hi there,
As I have become more experienced, I have tended to believe that the procedures actually become more difficult. As my experience grows, so does my first hand knowledge of the complications of various procedures. The stress level is less but my desire for perfection is much stronger and therefore nothing is routine as I become the "go to" person for more junior residents.

One thing about surgery is that once you make a mistake, it's there forever. Anything that you cut is never the same a it was pre-cut. You have to keep your thought processes one or two steps ahead of your hands because there are decisions to be made with every move.

You cannot have a "bad" day. Once the patient is under, you have to get the job done. The excuses have to stop and you have to put everything that you can muster into your work. You just can do a halfway job and cover your tracks because of the above. The person under the drape is someone's mother, father, son or daughter. Would you want anthing less than 100% from your loved ones surgeon?

There has to be a bit of obsessive/compulsive about your personality to make a good surgeon. As you go through residency, you realize that doing well is less about technique and more about work and personal ethics. You also understand the meaning of "Surgeons are not made, they are forged" from my most brilliant professor RS.

njbmd :)
even as a newbie - hear hear.

we all own our success. and our mistakes. and now, people (real people) are both our successes and our mistakes.

my newest refrain is to wonder on the fact that each day (every day) i am astounded by at all that i learned today that i did not know yesterday. and i hope that each of these things makes me better for tomorrow.

when i learn again.

thanks njbmd. good input.
 
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