Oct 25, 2014
1
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Greetings everyone, thank you for taking the time to look and for those that provide some useful information to guide me.

Background Info:

I am currently 22 years old, and I live in New York City. I am currently a freshman at Laguardia Comm. College. I've attended a few classes before at a different community college between 19-20, but was academically dismissed for not attending and taking my schoolwork seriously. At the time, I was balancing school and working at a local hospital full time. I now gave up my full time position and took a part time position, weekends only. This is what initially got me involved in the healthcare field. The time away from school gave myself the much needed experience of what I want to do in life. I also dealt with the loss of my best friend passing away, and this significantly impacted me in a way that forever changed my life. I'm now back in school taking Eng, Math, Sociology, and Psychology. I decided to take these courses first to ease myself into school life. I'm doing well in all of my classes, I'm rusty so my first tests for Math/Socio/Psych wasn't perfect but it was not bad either (80s). I'm still developing my studying habits, time management, and learning to stay on top of things so it's a process (any tips on these subjects would be appreciated!).

There is still a lot that I'm figuring out. My main concerns are what should my plan be? I was thinking of taking some general education courses to boost my gpa, and get the necessary credits needed to transfer to a 4 year institution. Once I transfer to a 4 year institution, I will then take the science courses there, as I've read that it looks better taking those courses at a 4 year college than a community college for Med School Applicants.

I also considered earning my Associates in Nursing at my community college, but I'm not too sure if I would enjoy being a Nurse all my life. I also find being a doctor is a very unique skill, and that I can appreciate to have. Sure I can go this nursing route, I have my foot in the door by working in a hospital already, I have connections. If I earned my RN/BSN, I can immediately start working for the hospital I work in. However, I don't want to settle. I want to PUSH myself. I want to stay hungry. I want to be the best, that I can possibly be by pushing myself beyond my own limits. I know my potential. I need to know what I'm up against. Create a strategy, a plan. And execute. Big picture, little steps...
 
Oct 14, 2013
1,428
1,295
Comm college + academic dismissal does not bode well. Bring GPA up, kill the MCAT, volunteer, research, shadow. Dismissal institution GPA will bring your GPA down heavily.
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2006
32,831
12,591
The Other Side of the Portal
Greetings everyone, thank you for taking the time to look and for those that provide some useful information to guide me.

Background Info:

I am currently 22 years old, and I live in New York City. I am currently a freshman at Laguardia Comm. College. I've attended a few classes before at a different community college between 19-20, but was academically dismissed for not attending and taking my schoolwork seriously. At the time, I was balancing school and working at a local hospital full time. I now gave up my full time position and took a part time position, weekends only. This is what initially got me involved in the healthcare field. The time away from school gave myself the much needed experience of what I want to do in life. I also dealt with the loss of my best friend passing away, and this significantly impacted me in a way that forever changed my life. I'm now back in school taking Eng, Math, Sociology, and Psychology. I decided to take these courses first to ease myself into school life. I'm doing well in all of my classes, I'm rusty so my first tests for Math/Socio/Psych wasn't perfect but it was not bad either (80s). I'm still developing my studying habits, time management, and learning to stay on top of things so it's a process (any tips on these subjects would be appreciated!).

There is still a lot that I'm figuring out. My main concerns are what should my plan be? I was thinking of taking some general education courses to boost my gpa, and get the necessary credits needed to transfer to a 4 year institution. Once I transfer to a 4 year institution, I will then take the science courses there, as I've read that it looks better taking those courses at a 4 year college than a community college for Med School Applicants.

I also considered earning my Associates in Nursing at my community college, but I'm not too sure if I would enjoy being a Nurse all my life. I also find being a doctor is a very unique skill, and that I can appreciate to have. Sure I can go this nursing route, I have my foot in the door by working in a hospital already, I have connections. If I earned my RN/BSN, I can immediately start working for the hospital I work in. However, I don't want to settle. I want to PUSH myself. I want to stay hungry. I want to be the best, that I can possibly be by pushing myself beyond my own limits. I know my potential. I need to know what I'm up against. Create a strategy, a plan. And execute. Big picture, little steps...
What is your GPA from the first college you attended? If you apply to med schools, you'll be required to submit that transcript, as well as those from your current and 4-year schools. So part of your plan should be to retake all Cs, Ds, and Fs to take advantage of the grade replacement policy that AACOMAS DO med schools offer (for the same credits or more).
 
Aug 7, 2014
76
48
Chicago
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Just make sure to stay focused on school, and put less time into working.
 
Last edited:
Oct 1, 2013
42
44
Status
Medical Student
also, i would look at nursing route well before crossing it out. i know plenty of nurses that work extremely hard, and then transition into CNO/VP of Nursing roles at very large hospitals- also very unique and interesting roles.

take into consideration the fact that you'll have to pay for the 4 year college + MCAT prep + applications (you'll have to apply broadly to maximize chances) + flights to interviews (assuming you don't spend on hotels and stay with students) + medical school + low pay in residency.

this as opposed to RN/BSN where you can start doing what you want to do earlier (and more easily from the sound of it) and not be in a mountain of debt well into your 30s. its good to push yourself, but you can also push yourself to excel as a RN/BSN student (ultimately leading to a better quality of life/less stress about having to get into medical school).

just food for thought :)