Interested in Oral Surgery

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by Atlas, Jun 28, 2001.

  1. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    I was at the dentist yesterday and spoke to him about my interest in Dentistry. He asked me what fields I was interested in and I told him I'm relatively open at this point because I'm considering medical school as well. He mentioned that oral and maxillofacial surgery is wide open in our area and that it's an amazing specialty to go into. I was wondering how difficult it is to get as a DMD/DDS? What about as an MD/DDS? He mentioned getting an MD and DDS, but I'm not sure if that's necessarily a requirement to enter the field. What's your take on oral surgery? What do they do on a given day? Is it difficult to get into it? What are some pros and cons to the field?

    Thanks
     
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  3. Wasabi

    Wasabi Senior Member

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    Oral/Maxillofacial Surgery is the most difficult specialties get into for dental students. If I had to go to dental school, I would definitely shoot for this program, but I also realize my chances might be slim. In addition to being one of the top students of your class, you need to have excellent recommendations and extraordinary experiences in research, etc. If you are interested in learning more about O/M surgery, you can check out UIC's Dental website or you can visit them. I'm sure they will be extremely helpful.
     
  4. RacerDude2249

    RacerDude2249 Senior Member

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    Hey Wasabi,

    What is the UIC's Website? And what does UIC stand for? Thanks!

    Racerdude
     
  5. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    Thanks Wasabi. I understand that it is difficult to get. I basically assumed this because it sounds so appealing. Do you think it would be easier to get if you had a MD and a DDS degree? I've seen this combination of degrees before and it seems prevalent amongst the "big time" dentists like oral surgeons.
     
  6. Wasabi

    Wasabi Senior Member

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    UIC = University of Illinois at Chicago

    web page
     
  7. happynotes20

    happynotes20 Junior Member

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    well, Oral surgery can be a great specialty if that for you. You have to go through dental school and see if it fits you. It is challanging.
    Have to be at the top of the class, top 10, unless you have connections.
    But you have a long road down after 4 years of dental school.
     
  8. happynotes20

    happynotes20 Junior Member

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    the reason most oral surgeons have a DDS/DMD and MD is because in most programs you have to go an additional 2 years of med school. And several years of further training.
     
  9. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Manboob Extraordinaire

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    I believe happynotes is correct, once you become an oral surgeon you are granted an MD degree in addition to your DDS/DMD degree which you would have already completed. If you want to go into this specialty be ready for a lot of school - 4 yrs DDS/DMD, 4 yrs O/M surgery, 6 yrs residency, and you might have to do an General Practice Residency in between Dental school and the specialty.
     
  10. Wasabi

    Wasabi Senior Member

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    Originally posted by Goat Boy:
    I believe happynotes is correct, once you become an oral surgeon you are granted an MD degree in addition to your DDS/DMD degree which you would have already completed.


    I don't believe that this is true?
     
  11. RacerDude2249

    RacerDude2249 Senior Member

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    I'm interested in oral surgery and I have done some research on this subject....

    There are two types of oral surgery programs offered throughout the nation. A 4-year oral surgery certificate program and a 6-year oral surgery program in which both the certificate and an MD are granted upon completion. To get into an oral surgery program, one must have a DDS or DMD degree. The only major difference between the 4 and 6 year programs is that the 6 year program gives one more flexibility as to the different types of surgical procedures one can do. Oral surgery programs are extremely competetive to get into, thus, one must have a high Part 1 National Board score, excellent letters of recommendation, experience volunteering in an oral surgery clinic, and preferably research (although this is not always required). Also, completing externships are looked upon very, very favorably as they expose one to a specific oral surgery program. Anyway, that is my info. on this subject.

    Racerdude

    P.S. Where did Monster2 go? I almost miss teasing him.... :D
     
  12. anamod

    anamod Senior Member

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    Racerdude is right on the mark with two types of programs. I too have an interest in Oral Surgery, and have done most of my shadowing at a local Oral Surgery clinic. They are a great group of guys,they not only let me observe but some let me assist with inoffice procedures. From what they tell me there is no real difference in the scope of practice between DMD/certificate and DMD/MD. It's just more prestigous. There is something Canadian about this place. Dude, wheres my car?
     
  13. endoman

    endoman Junior Member

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    Oral Surgery is a competitive field, but it is by no means the most competitive. My graduating class had four people to apply, and all four were accepted to their first choice. Only one applicant was in the top ten, and the other three were 12, 15, and 22. In fact, all of the available slots were not filled across the country. One must really be motivated to go into Oral Surgery because the hours are long and the work is very hard. Good luck with your future plans.
     

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