Interesting suggestion(s) made by a Family Medicine physician...

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A family med physician where I work suggested that they should separate and shorten PCP education from the whole medical school stuff. He suggested that after the first two year of med school that people who know they want to become PCP ( FM, PEDs, Psych) should do a 1 year rotation+ 2 years residency. I am not a med student; therefore, I have no idea how would that work and how these students would do on the board. He excluded IM from that, which was interesting to me since I have seen IM physicians function just like family medicine where I work. But again I am not in medical school, so I don't if there is any plausibility in what he said. I said to myself: he seems to be making the case for PA or NP replacing PCP physicians... I am pretty sure that was not his intention.
 

BuddyTheElf

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A family med physician where I work suggested that they should separate and shorten PCP education from the whole medical school stuff. He suggested that after the first two year of med school that people who know they want to become PCP ( FM, PEDs, Psych) should do a 1 year rotation+ 2 years residency. I am not a med student; therefore, I have no idea how would that work and how these students would do on the board. He excluded IM from that, which was interesting to me since I have seen IM physicians function just like family medicine where I work. But again I am not in medical school, so I don't if there is any plausibility in what he said. I said to myself: he seems to be making the case for PA or NP replacing PCP physicians... I am pretty sure that was not his intention.
There are a few schools that are shortening their program if you commit to going into FM right away. I think it's an accelerated 3 year program and tuition is supplemented for a portion of it? An interesting concept; I'm not sure if it'll ever catch on though.
 
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scoKraz4

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I think they should do programs like Germany. 6 years total for both undergrad and med school
 

medickdb

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There are a few schools that are shortening their program if you commit to going into FM right away. I think it's an accelerated 3 year program and tuition is supplemented for a portion of it? An interesting concept; I'm not sure if it'll ever catch on though.
LECOM-E has a 3 year, accelerated primary care physician track.
 
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Lost Vagus

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I think they should do programs like Germany. 6 years total for both undergrad and med school
There is a six year program at UMKC that takes students right out of high school. It doesn't have a very good reputation though and the medical students are often thought of as very immature. 24 is way too young to be a first year resident. A lot of times they end up not having the social skills most people develop during undergrad.
 

scoKraz4

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There is a six year program at UMKC that takes students right out of high school. It doesn't have a very good reputation though and the medical students are often thought of as very immature. 24 is way too young to be a first year resident. A lot of times they end up not having the social skills most people develop during undergrad.
Word.
 

Mad Jack

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The problem is, many people change their mind as they go through school. Ask any doctor if they are in the specialty they originally imagined, and most will say they changed their mind a few times along the way. Boxing medical students in to one specialty before they have ever done a single rotation is sort of unfair to them. They don't even really know what they are committing to.
 

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First of all, I don't think psych is considered primary care. Second, I think it's a bad idea. FM is jack-of-all trades type of specialty. Why would you not want them to rotate in every specialty if you expect them to know a little something about them?
 

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I think the AMA is also trying to push an accelerated pathway for primary care. 11 medical schools were given some $$$ for this purpose.
 

Mad Jack

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To my knowledge this is only for former PA's
They have three accelerated pathways. The two physician assistant pathways are the primary care pathway and the specialist pathway, both of which took 12 students last I checked. The last pathway is for traditional medical students and is called the Primary Care Scholars Pathway (PCSP). It allows you to complete medical school in three years by cutting out rotations not related to primary care and doing extra classes during the summer and saves you one year of tuition. In return you are expected to complete a primary care (FM or IM) residency at an osteopathic institution and practice for a period of 5 years in said primary care field. Due to your limited rotation options and need to match before having done practically any rotations, I doubt many program directors would consider you for their residency programs. This leaves you likely matching into one of LECOM's PCSP affiliate programs. If you decide to not go for primary care or do not practice for five years, they charge you a full year's tuition, due immediately, obviously with no loan options provided. Link to the PCSP is below.

http://lecom.edu/college-medicine.php/Primary-Care-Scholars-Pathway/49/2205/612/2393
 

Lee

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This is a concept sometimes floated by those who misunderstand the difficulty of producing a good FM doc. FM is the most difficult specialty in terms of breadth of knowledge. To train a good family medicine doc takes years of experience and exposure to many fields with a diversity of patients and cases.

If we want more providers to run Minute Clinics or augment very basic primary care aspects, train more PAs and NPs. FM docs are better utilized as team leaders or managers in the complex healthcare environment.

Unfortunately FM docs do not do a lot of procedures, so historically their income has been lower than procedure heavy specialties. But, income should not be used as a measure of job difficulty or challenge. The 800K per year GI doc does 2 things primarily: colos and endos. Do they require as much training as they receive? Some would argue no.

Anyhow, that's my 2 cents from my years in the trenches.
 

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BestDoctorEver

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This is a concept sometimes floated by those who misunderstand the difficulty of producing a good FM doc. FM is the most difficult specialty in terms of breadth of knowledge. To train a good family medicine doc takes years of experience and exposure to many fields with a diversity of patients and cases.

If we want more providers to run Minute Clinics or augment very basic primary care aspects, train more PAs and NPs. FM docs are better utilized as team leaders or managers in the complex healthcare environment.

Unfortunately FM docs do not do a lot of procedures, so historically their income has been lower than procedure heavy specialties. But, income should not be used as a measure of job difficulty or challenge. The 800K per year GI doc does 2 things primarily: colos and endos. Do they require as much training as they receive? Some would argue no.

Anyhow, that's my 2 cents from my years in the trenches.
800K? I thought it was 400-500K....
 
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I think they should do programs like Germany. 6 years total for both undergrad and med school
6 years including residency
 
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cliquesh

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800K? I thought it was 400-500K....
2010 MGMA survey says the average is $496k. $610k at the 75th percentile, and $777k at the 90th percentile. It will likely drop soon when the government decreases the reimbursement for endoscopy starting in 2014.
 
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2010 MGMA survey says the average is $496k. $610k at the 75th percentile, and $777k at the 90th percentile. It will likely drop soon when the government decreases the reimbursement for endoscopy starting in 2014.
These salaries are outrageously high IMO...
 

cliquesh

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The MGMA survey is suppose to be the most accurate salary survey, which employeers supposedly use as a bench mark for salaries. But, yeah, most people think they're inflated.
 
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cliquesh

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A lot f these specialties (or specialists) are laughing all the way to the bank... It is amazing to see the average salary of some of these specialties is as much as 3-4 times of what PCP make. They should decrease some of these reimbursements for specialists and invest the money in primary care, which is the bedrock of medicine IMO.
Specialists get paid so much mostly because of procedures. Family docs can perform procedures too, but many don't for whatever reason. Anyway, the current reimbursment updates are favoring primary care physicians over specialists.
 
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QuantumJ

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As mentioned already, texas tech lubbock has an accelerated family practice track that's very attractive to many applicants. First year is the same as everyone else. The summer between MS1 and 2 you start on the family med track. During MS2, you are in class with everyone in the same classes but you are also taking some extra family medicine classes (I believe it's a longitudinal family medicine clinic rotation). MS3 is then traditional rotations and then you graduate. This way you 1) Don't have tuition or living costs during MS4 since it doesn't exist 2) MS2 is completely funded by scholarship 3) You are guaranteed a FM residency spot through the program 4) If during 3rd year you change your mind, the free MS2 scholarship turns into a loan and you can continue on to MS4 and match into a different specialty.

It'd be nice to see more schools adopt something like this. Going from starting med school to attending in 6 years and graduating with about half to three quarters as much debt makes FM a much more attractive option to students (especially nontrads or those worried about debt load and going into a lower paying specialty).
 

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To my knowledge this is only for former PA's
No, there is a separate program for those wanting primary care as well. It's 3 years, cuts out all the vacations and some electives. The goal is to try to make up the difference with the PCP shortage.