Intern Year "Survival" manual favorites?

Discussion in 'Internship' started by timtye78, Mar 19, 2004.

  1. timtye78

    timtye78 Senior Member
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    Dear Friends,


    Ok, so I matched, that over now.Sigh..I am glad it's done!

    What "intern survival manual" should I buy? I realize that this is a personal decision, but what are some of the favorites out there and why? I would like to hear some discussion before I buy!

    Have a great day!
     
  2. beyond all hope

    beyond all hope Senior Member
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    My personal favorite. I didn't do IM, but it's suprisingly accurate for internship. A few things have changed, but not as much as you'd think since the sevenites. Basically the only difference is malpractice.

    If you're talking about pocketbooks, it depends on the specialty. I only used the ER intern's survival guide, and even that one I stopped looking at after the first month or so. Medicine people seem to like the little black Pocket Medicine for theory and Washingon Manual for practice.

    The only book I carry on me now is Tarascon's Pharmacology. Only book you really need.
     
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  3. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo
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    I ended up getting the On Call Principles ofr my House Officer, but realized that by being an EM intern I can handle almost anything that happens on teh floors, so I didnt' carry it after the first day. In my lab coat now, I carry the Pocket Pharmacopiea, the Tarascon's Critical Carea dn Internal Meidcine, and the Tarascon's Adult Emergency Medicine pocketbook... both are incredibly useful, even in the ED. I also carry around the EMRA guide to antibiotic use. Far easier ot read than Sanfords.


    Q, DO
     
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  4. WaitingForJuly

    WaitingForJuly Junior Member
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    The only thing you absolutely need is a pharmacopoeia. Either Tarascon or Epocrates if you have a Palm. If you have a palm it would be worthwhile to download the free Hopkins antibiotic guide. It's much more straight forward than Sanford. If you get to the point where you need Sanford to treat someone just put them on broad spectrum antibiotics for now and get an ID consult.

    I still have the Maxwells handbook in my coat only because it's so small. The MGH Internal Medicine guide (the black book) is great if you are at an academic place with a lot of teaching/pimping. Not much use for actual patient management though.

    I found On Call: Principles and Protocols very helpful as a security blanket for the first couple months of call. It has some great, practical chapters like assessing volume status and pronouncing patients (stressful the first time at 3AM if you don't know the proper procedure). I haven't opened it in months though. The Washington Manual Intern Survival Guide is pretty helpful too for the first couple months. Between those two books and a drug book, you should be able to handle anything on July 1.
     
  5. Adawaal

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    I would definitely have to include Scut Monkey by Gomella and Haist. Steve Haist is a friend of mine from way back and is currently the IM program director at a major Southeast academic medical center. Not only does it include everything about notes, procedures (both step-by-step and illustrated), and meds but it also will actually fit in that coat pocket for busy call nights.
     
  6. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    I am currently a second year, but the Washington Manual's Internship Survival Guide was the absolute easiest read for on call and for dealing with basic problems in patient complaints, procedures, and notes. While it isn't a reference guide it is an absolute necessity.
     
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  7. timtye78

    timtye78 Senior Member
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    Thanks for the tips! I appreciate the help!
     
  8. gwen

    gwen Senior Member
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    our chiefs gave us two pieces of paper with info that is extremely helpful when on call. believe me, you don't have time to look through books when you get a 3:30 am call on bradycardia. i mean, those books are fine if you want to read in your spare time.

    i also used pocket medicine (the little black book) occassionally. that stuff is good for rounds when you have attendings that pimp. the best thing to use during admissions is up to date...it should be on most hospital computers. its very quick and easy when you are really confused about a patient or want to know more about a diagnosis you or your senior just made.

    you obviously need pharmacopia. honestly, that's the only thing in my pocket now...and has been since september. i never used a palm or the washington manual. the ICU pharmacopia is also somewhat helpful.

    you'll be very anal in july, a little tense in august and throwing away most books and papers out of your heavy white coats by september.

    enjoy the intern ride! i can't wait to be a senior! yee haw...
     
  9. ResidentMD

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    Super 6 year bump. 2008 edition of Washington Manual Internship Survival Guide or 2004 edition (the latest) of On Call principles and protocols? Or anything else?
     
  10. gutonc

    gutonc No Meat, No Treat
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    Pocket Medicine...if anything.
     
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