Internal Medicine residency

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by vyparik1, Nov 10, 2001.

  1. vyparik1

    vyparik1 Member

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    Hello. I am only a MS1 but would like to find out what an IM residency entails. How many hours per week do residents work? How easy/difficult is it to obtain an IM residency? What kind of lifestyle do they have? Also, I know after finishing your IM residency, you can do various fellowships..How much more compensation is there if one does an IM fellowship compared to just doing an IM residency?...Can someone (perhaps an IM resident) please answer my questions?

    Thanks for your help!

    V
     
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  3. godfather

    godfather Member

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    All you need is a pulse and you'll match in IM.
     
  4. jdaasbo

    jdaasbo Senior Member

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    Yes, but to what kind of quality IM program?

    This is important to consider. There are many IM programs out there, and many that do not fill, but you must assess carefully. Big name programs will tend to be more competitive than others, ofcourse. Some are very competitive. There is a lot of variation. In addition, some programs are more geared toward primary care while others are geared to specialization (called "categorical" typically). Some try and do both in the same track, while others have separate primary and categorical tracks.

    It is not like ortho, in which you must be competitive to get ANY spot. But you will need to do well and have good letters of rec and boards to be competitive for "big name" programs. My advice, do as well as you can. Don't stress about it. You may change your mind in your fourth year and decide you want ortho instead, and then you will be much happier knowing that you pushed yourself during the first three years of school.
     
  5. e2k

    e2k Member

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    Dear Vyparik,

    It's good to start thinking about what you want do to as a speciality, but you can't really know what you want until you have some experience in that field.

    I recommned that if you're serious about IM that you start shadowing an IM doc. Get a feel for what his/her life is like, the work, the atmosphere. Enjoying your speciality is much more important than hours or compensation.

    Also realize that you'll know a lot more about what you want out of medicine once you get into the clinical years.

    Bottom line, think about the future but realize you can't really make a decision at least until you've done your third year rotations in order to get a feel for the world of medicine.

    ERIC
     
  6. docab

    docab Member

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    As with all residency programs, IM programs vary but, overall, the majority of your time is spent on the wards taking care of patients with a combination of GI, pulmonary, renal, cardiac and infectious disease problems. My program also has a lot of neuro. There's also time spent with heme/onc and endocrine patients. You'll also have a number of months in the ICU and CCU (although in some programs, these are not separate rotations; instead, your ward team will have some patients on the "regular wards" and others in the ICU and/or CCU. Call varies from every 3rd-5th night (again, program/rotation dependent). Some programs have night float (I personally think this is our saving grace). On average, you have 1-2 half-day outpatient clinic periods per week. There are also "ambulatory" type rotations (1-2months/year) where you spend time doing all out-patient work, often in subspecialty clinics where you wouldn't ordinarily spend much time (say urology, STD clinics, ...). And, yes, you get elective time!

    It's true that there is always some residency spot open somewhere. However, if you care where you match, then be prepared for some competition. Obviously, you need more than a heart-beat to match at good IM programs, despite the off-hand comment of the above poster. I think the lifestyle during residency depends upon the program you pick and once in the real-world, it depends where you work (Practices that utilize hospitalists have less call/hospital responsibility. Kaiser hospitals protect you pretty well from tons of call nights).

    Although I don't have the numbers in front of me, you can count on making significantly more money if you subspecialize. IM docs make, on average, somewhere between $100-150,000. The higher end range is greater for hospitalists. Subspecialists make between $200-500,000 depending upon the specialty and the type of practice you set-up.

    Hope that helps.
     
  7. theD.O.C.

    theD.O.C. Member

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    Night float is where a separate team comes on at night (typically around 10:30p) to relieve the on call team. Night float usu. does the cross cover (taking care of pts. not belonging to the on call team) and sometimes admitting as well. Many IM programs (both academic and community) have night float these days. It allows you to get a few hours sleep on call nights. It's sweet.
     

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