Sep 10, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi all,

First of all, I've found this forum so extremely helpful, and I would like to thank everyone who have contributed here.

As you guys can see, I'm an international, attending a university in my passport country. Since my father was a diplomat, I grew up pretty much all over and I speak 3 languages. My parents insisted that I return to my passport country for college.
I really want to attend medical school in the US, and I have a few questions -

1. I've completed most of my prerequisites in the US, through a summer session+fall semester as an exchange student. Would that satisfy the requirement of (many) medical schools there that I complete my pre-reqs in the US?

2. How would I be treated as an applicant from a highly underrepresented country? (Not going to write where I'm from, but trust me, you can count the number of people from my country who study in the US on one hand). Is there any chance this will help me? Diversity and all that...

3. I can pay my way without needing any scholarships or loans - would that help me out in any way?

Thank you all, and good luck!
 
OP
D
Sep 10, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
PS: I know about the user Doctor Strange, this is not some attempt to mock him or whatever. "Doctor Stranger" is the name of Korean drama I like.
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
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Academic Administration
Hi all,

First of all, I've found this forum so extremely helpful, and I would like to thank everyone who have contributed here.

As you guys can see, I'm an international, attending a university in my passport country. Since my father was a diplomat, I grew up pretty much all over and I speak 3 languages. My parents insisted that I return to my passport country for college.
I really want to attend medical school in the US, and I have a few questions -

1. I've completed most of my prerequisites in the US, through a summer session+fall semester as an exchange student. Would that satisfy the requirement of (many) medical schools there that I complete my pre-reqs in the US?

2. How would I be treated as an applicant from a highly underrepresented country? (Not going to write where I'm from, but trust me, you can count the number of people from my country who study in the US on one hand). Is there any chance this will help me? Diversity and all that...

3. I can pay my way without needing any scholarships or loans - would that help me out in any way?

Thank you all, and good luck!
Many medical schools do not accept international applicants. Those that do generally want to see that at least 90 credits (equivalent to 3 years of full time enrollment) have been taken in the US (or Canada). The MSAR (a printed item and online access) produced by the AAMC (American Association of Medical Colleges) will tell you what the requirements are for each school.

Applicants from underrepresented countries are not in high demand. If you have language skills that are in demand in the location where you will be studying (Spanish anywhere in the US, other languages in selected locations) then perhaps you would get some traction with your language skills. If many of your countrymen are in the US and very few are physicians, then you might be considered someone who might meet a need in an enclave of immigrants/expats but that would be many years down the road.

Not needing scholarships/loans will not play into the admission decision but it will smooth the way once you have an offer. We have seen international students who ended up not matriculating because the financial situation could not be worked out sufficiently.
 

gonnif

Only 389 Days Until Next Presidential Election
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Just to emphasis what Madame LizzyM has already pointed out: not being a citizen or permanent resident will be a major block.

In 2014 of the 1160 who applied and were noted as "legal residence not in the US" 130 matriculated. So 11% or about 1 in 10 chance of getting in.
( see tables 3&4 at https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/)
 
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bearintraining

7+ Year Member
May 20, 2011
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Medical Student, Post Doc
Just to emphasis what Madame LizzyM has already pointed out: not being a citizen or permanent resident will be a major block.

In 2014 of the 1160 who applied and were noted as "legal residence not in the US" 130 matriculated. So 11% or about 1 in 10 chance of getting in.
( see tables 3&4 at https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/)
Although that doesn't tell us how many acceptances there were.
 

gonnif

Only 389 Days Until Next Presidential Election
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Although that doesn't tell us how many acceptances there were.

What is does say of a 1160 individuals who submitted application, 130 eventually matriculated into medical school. The number of acceptances that any indivdual can actually use is only 1. Therefore 1 in 10 who apply actually begin medical school. Any other metric is really misleading to an applicant
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
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Although that doesn't tell us how many acceptances there were.
In other words, how many got an offer they couldn't use because of problems with finances or visas as well as how many had offers and matriculated.
 
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bearintraining

7+ Year Member
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In other words, how many got an offer they couldn't use because of problems with finances or visas as well as how many had offers and matriculated.
Thanks @LizzyM -- this is exactly what I meant.
 
OP
D
Sep 10, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Thank you all for your replies... it looks like my chances aren't too good :( I guess I'll try anyway, but if it doesn't work out, I'll try transferring to our main medical university.
Supposing I graduate from there, how difficult would it be to get into a residency program in the US? Would have graduated from a foreign medical school be a major obstacle?

Thanks again and good luck!!
 

gonnif

Only 389 Days Until Next Presidential Election
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2009
20,469
31,126
The Big Bad Apple
Status
Non-Student
Thank you all for your replies... it looks like my chances aren't too good :( I guess I'll try anyway, but if it doesn't work out, I'll try transferring to our main medical university.
Supposing I graduate from there, how difficult would it be to get into a residency program in the US? Would have graduated from a foreign medical school be a major obstacle?

Thanks again and good luck!!
It is extremely difficult. The table below is from National Residency Matching Program. While formally about 50% of IMGs match into residency, in reality the odds are much worse. These percentages do not take into account those who withdrew from active match (likely for not passing STEP II) and those who applied but did not rank at residency program (meaning no one wanted them at all). Including those, the overall match rate is 38%
 

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PeruvianMD

5+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2013
284
165
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Medical Student (Accepted)
international student here! It's really a difficult path, but int students do get into med school. Good luck to you!