International Non-US Applicant Questions About PhD Funding

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by PETRAN, 05.17.14.

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  1. PETRAN

    PETRAN 2+ Year Member

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    Hello to all the people of the Student Doctor Psych. Forum


    I'm a non-US psychology graduate with post-graduate (masters) degrees in cognitive neuropsych and another one in clinical neuropsych (well, where i work you don't need a PhD to practice clinical neuropsych. heh). I do some clinical work with assessments and cog. rehabilitation of people with TBI. I was always interested in pursuing PhD level work and whilst i like the clinical side of neuropsych and cognition, i am extremely interested in human factors/engineering psych. especially applying it on people with cognitive disabilities (although not only restricted to clinical populations, e.g. another area is attentional allocation in various environments which i guess it is pretty common in that field).


    My question is about funding. Do human factors PhD programs of state Unis like the one in central Florida (or Clemson if i recall well?) cover the academic expenses? I see that for non-US (or non-state?) applicants the rates are over the roof, does the University cover ALL of it (or maybe part of it?), especially if you do assistanships, teaching and stuff? Is it possible to find part-time employment on a related subject while you do the PhD?

    Also any information on career prospects with a engineering psych. PhD would be appreciated, although i realise it is an obscure area of psych.

    I also wonder if two post-graduate masters degrees would look...bad in my application (i will also be a non-trad student since i am 32 :p). Anyway thanks for reading!

    P.
     
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  3. MCParent

    MCParent Bronze Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I'm a Canadian citizen who got his PhD in the U.S.

    I was freaked out by the $30,000-ish tuition fees listed on the web site for non-citizens too, but all the funded programs I interviewed at gave full tuition remission to non-citizens as well (I interviewed at clinical and counseling programs, but it is the same at the funded experimental programs I know of).

    You may be able to work limited hours while on F-1 but it's complicated because your assistanceship will officially take up some to all of those hours. It has a lot to do with how the individual university classes you, assigns your full-time-employment ratio, and pays you.
     
  4. PETRAN

    PETRAN 2+ Year Member

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    Hello, Thanks for the reply.

    I see, so most funded programs give full remission. These are good news.

    But what about living expenses? Are you entitled to a loan if you are outside the US? Seems to be difficult to work at the same time for extra money (especially if you spend so much time in the Uni as you are supposed to).
     
  5. Taly0402

    Taly0402 2+ Year Member

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    You are eligible for loans, however they can't be federal. For a private loan, you need a US citizen to co-sign for you to be approved

    That being said, most programs offer enough of a stipend where a loan isn't necessary. It's doable to live off your stipend, however, it's not a glamorous lifestyle by any means.

    Being an international student definitely has hurdles, but it's worth it!
     
  6. usernumber

    usernumber

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    Exactly as mcparent and taly0402 have said, funded programs generally provide full tuition remissions for international students, and as far as I am aware, many of these programs also have graduate assistant (GA) positions that offer a small stipend which can be enough to cover cost of living (depending on the program and location). From my understanding, international students are allowed to hold these positions (generally <20 hours a week at the university). FYI, I am an international student finishing up my PhD in the States and between my GA stipend, tuition waiver, and ridiculously frugal living, I've been able to manage without taking any loans... that said, I live in a rural setting and my cost of living is considerably lower than bigger cities.
     
  7. Marissa4usa

    Marissa4usa 7+ Year Member

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    I am also an international student (at a rural university) and I receive full tuition remission and a stipend that even pays enough to allow me to purchase a small starter home.
     
  8. PETRAN

    PETRAN 2+ Year Member

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    Thanks for the replies people, your responses are much appreciated!

    So, it seems that both tuition remission and stipend are possible, these are good news since i wouldn't be excited in getting a loan. Surely, i prefer a simplistic lifestyle (at least, a simplistic one for a few years!) than an indebted but slightly more luxurious one :p

    I also read that PhDs in Human Factors and/or I/O Psychology can be find employment in related positions even before finishing the PhD and that the job market is not much saturated yet.I hope it is true, although i would definitely do some more research regarding those specialties. It is a good thing though that you don't need APA-fellowships for those, it would be too long of a road to take IMO. :p

    Did you contact the Uni's financial services/funding issues etc. before you got accepted for the PhD?

    Again,thanks to everyone!

    P.
     
  9. MCParent

    MCParent Bronze Donor 2+ Year Member

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    HF people where I am do well for jobs as far as I'm aware.

    You'd contact the school's international center after you get accepted, which you would work with throughout your F-1 application and time in the program. I guess you could contact them before to verify things, but I don't think much can actually happen (on their end; you need to get your SEVIS, go to your consulate if that's how it works for your country, etc.) until you physically appear on the campus to start the paperwork.
     
  10. PETRAN

    PETRAN 2+ Year Member

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    Right, seems logical.


    Ok, thanks for all the help guys, if anything else in mind please post it. Your replies are much appreciated cheers!
     

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