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interviews & parents in the dental profession

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ak47

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so one of my parents is in the dental profession. any others 've gotten some comments from interviews regarding high out of state tuition and how it won't be a problem with my parents being in the field cuz they prob have the $. another comment about "oh your parent probably told you to say that" in response to one of my answers. so i've gotten some rude/awkward comments that i've just laughed off so far.

at first i thought it would be a benefit to have a parent in the field, but so far it's just been bringing me down. any suggestions? how have your experiences regarding this coming up in interviews been?
 

Lopyswine

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so one of my parents is in the dental profession. any others 've gotten some comments from interviews regarding high out of state tuition and how it won't be a problem with my parents being in the field cuz they prob have the $. another comment about "oh your parent probably told you to say that" in response to one of my answers. so i've gotten some rude/awkward comments that i've just laughed off so far.

at first i thought it would be a benefit to have a parent in the field, but so far it's just been bringing me down. any suggestions? how have your experiences regarding this coming up in interviews been?


I don't have any specific advice for those comments from interviewers. Howver, you need to make it VERY CLEAR that you are interested in dentistry on your own. Dental school is notorious for having legacy children that are "pushed" into the career. Its not good for the student or for the school.

The school wants to make sure you're passionate about the profession and not applying simply because dad made a good income and suggested you do the same.
 
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so one of my parents is in the dental profession. any others 've gotten some comments from interviews regarding high out of state tuition and how it won't be a problem with my parents being in the field cuz they prob have the $. another comment about "oh your parent probably told you to say that" in response to one of my answers. so i've gotten some rude/awkward comments that i've just laughed off so far.

at first i thought it would be a benefit to have a parent in the field, but so far it's just been bringing me down. any suggestions? how have your experiences regarding this coming up in interviews been?

I'm there with you, I think it's hurting me that my parents are both in the field. I anticipated this years ago though, so I started working for other dentists a while back. I feel if you work for other dentists for years instead of mom/dad it shows you genuinely love what you are doing. Also I try not to mention the fact that my parents are dentists, and if it comes up I just say yes they are and talk about something else. I feel its gone pretty well so far...
 

yayforcoffee

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On the opposite -- I feel like if you play your cards right, having someone close to you in the dental field can be a huge asset during an interview. I've brought it up at every interview, and at Michigan's MMI I think I told almost all of the 8 interviewers.

In other words, it can go either way. But like lopyswine stated, it can really hurt you if you just throw it out there and don't continue with it. I springboarded a lot of my responses starting with, "Well, my father has been a dentist for xx years, and I've noticed x,y and z about dentistry from him... [elaborate] ... based off of this, as well as my time involved with [certain extracurricular, etc.], this is how I see ...[respond to question]."

Look at your parent as an opportunity for increasingly detailed insights that show you know what dentistry is about and display that you have pictured yourself living as a dentist for the rest of your life!

Good luck!
 

Lopyswine

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On the opposite -- I feel like if you play your cards right, having someone close to you in the dental field can be a huge asset during an interview. I've brought it up at every interview, and at Michigan's MMI I think I told almost all of the 8 interviewers.

In other words, it can go either way. But like lopyswine stated, it can really hurt you if you just throw it out there and don't continue with it. I springboarded a lot of my responses starting with, "Well, my father has been a dentist for xx years, and I've noticed x,y and z about dentistry from him... [elaborate] ... based off of this, as well as my time involved with [certain extracurricular, etc.], this is how I see ...[respond to question]."

Look at your parent as an opportunity for increasingly detailed insights that show you know what dentistry is about and display that you have pictured yourself living as a dentist for the rest of your life!

Good luck!

I'd go very cautious with starting answering like that....
 

somethinpositiv

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having someone close to you in the dental field can be a huge asset during an interview. I've brought it up at every interview, and at Michigan's MMI I think I told almost all of the 8 interviewers.

LOL! every MMI! :laugh:

Interviewer: "How do you feel about the controversy over at unnamed midwest school?"
You: "Well, my parents both are dentists..."

Interviewer: "Should smokers pay higher insurance premiums?"
You: "Well, my parents both are dentists and both smoke, so no..."

Interviewer: "Would you recommend chewing tobacco to a patient?"
You: "Well, my parents, who are both dentists by the way, would say no..."
 
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