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Is a lipid anchored protein an integral or peripheral protein?

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by panmit, May 16, 2014.

  1. panmit

    panmit 2+ Year Member

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    May 14, 2014
    Is a lipid anchored protein an integral or peripheral protein?

    I think it is a integral protein because it is covalently linked inside the membrane. What do you guys think?
     
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  3. DogeDDS

    DogeDDS Wow 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 8, 2014
    Edit. Nevermind
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2014
  4. Daneosaurus

    Daneosaurus D3 5+ Year Member

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    Mar 13, 2012
    It's neither. They are their own class: lipid-anchored proteins. Integral proteins extend through both of the bilayers, peripheral proteins attach on either side of the bilayer, lipid-anchored covalently attach to either the N-terminus of the internal lipid structure or to the cysteine residues.
     
  5. panmit

    panmit 2+ Year Member

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    May 14, 2014
    transmembrane proteins extend through both bilayers. Its a type of integral protein. Integral proteins do not necessarily have to extend through both layers
     
  6. BrazilianRider

    BrazilianRider 2+ Year Member

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    Oct 28, 2013
    Panmit is right. I took a Eukaryotic Cell Structure course over the past semester and everything except Protein-Bound Proteins are basically Integral Proteins.

    If it's a protein bound to an Integral Membrane Protein, then it is Peripheral.

    Remember that you only need salts or a pH change to isolate Peripherals, but you need detergent to isolate Integrals.
     

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