Is dentistry a good profession for people who don't like to be anchored in one spot?

Aug 25, 2017
5
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I want a career in healthcare and am seriously considering dentistry, but I fear being one will cause me to be very stationary. I would like a profession that doesn't anchor. I would like to know that I can move whenever I'd like, but I feel like in dentistry, to make the big bucks, you need to stay put where your practice is. Any insight from practicing, free spirit dentists out there?
 
May 22, 2017
43
19
Status
Pre-Dental
I want a career in healthcare and am seriously considering dentistry, but I fear being one will cause me to be very stationary. I would like a profession that doesn't anchor. I would like to know that I can move whenever I'd like, but I feel like in dentistry, to make the big bucks, you need to stay put where your practice is. Any insight from practicing, free spirit dentists out there?
If you are not doing it for the money, you can consider mission trips on different countries.

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Hnl7

2+ Year Member
May 27, 2017
115
106
I've spent quite a bit of time with dentists with corporate practice - if you are willing to you can rotate within the company spending each new contract period at a new town - just depends if you are alright with less desirable towns and cities
 

The Flossopher

2+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2016
246
590
Status
Dental Student
I would like to know that I can move whenever I'd like
Who are you running from?

It depends on what your idea of freedom is. You are going to be anchored to some degree no matter what. If it's not to a physical office, it's to a corporation. You'd be obliged to fulfill a contract as an associate at each location for a specified time period.

If you want to settle down in a particular area but you don't want to work in the same office every day, you could float around different practices each day of the week (assuming you don't have to sign a non-compete anywhere). This is becoming common for certain specialties, especially periodontics.

Also, dental licenses are administered by state boards. You'd need to obtain a new license when you move to a new state, which could be difficult depending on the state. I'm pretty sure some boards want assurance that you plan to stay there before they license you.
 

Incis0r

I LOVE Dental School
5+ Year Member
Aug 10, 2014
4,633
5,936
Alterac Valley
Have you considered the Military?
This.

Military dentistry won't make you rich, but as long as you are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to serve (including deployments), it'll be a good life where you get to contribute to a great cause, travel the world, and practice dentistry without worrying about the patient's ability to pay or about your production.
 
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