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Is Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution (EAS) tested on the MCAT2015?

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by balopathic45, Jul 29, 2015.

  1. balopathic45

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    Haven't seen it during content review - wondering if I should consult my ochemII notes
     
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  3. Neutrophil2016

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    Aromatic chemistry is completely ignored on the new MCAT. I wouldn't go back and look over it unless you just had an interest. Any extra knowledge will only help you, but I can almost guarantee that it will not appear. If you look at the content list you will also see that it is not listed. I think it was on the old MCAT though.
     
  4. yeezuswest

    2+ Year Member

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    Just adding that it could still be helpful to certain degree with other content, like biochem. For example, knowing the difference between ortho/para/meta could better help you be familiarized with the structure of catecholamines and other neurotransmitters which are tyrosine based. That right there combines some organic chemistry along with amino acids and neurotransmitters, and connecting the dots like that is something the MCAT tests for.
     
    balopathic45 and Neutrophil2016 like this.
  5. ElectricNoogie

    ElectricNoogie MCAT enthusiast

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    I would be careful throwing such proclamations out there. If you look at the AAMC content outline, under 5D: "Structure, function, and reactivity of biologically-relevant molecules" you can plainly see the following:

    Polycyclic and Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds (OC, BC)
    • Biological aromatic heterocycles
    Does this mean EAS will definitely be tested? No. Is testing the aromatic concept possible? Under this heading it sure is. The topic is unlikely to factor much into the exam so it's gonna be low yield, but I would not go so far as to label it "completely ignored." Aromaticity could easily be wrapped into AA chemistry, receptor/ligand interactions, hormone structure, and many others.

    Most of the MCAT content books I have seen (EK, NS, Kaplan, TPR) do a solid enough job on it. I would not necessarily go back to your orgo II notes, but review aromatics and their unique properties once you've got traditionally higher yield orgo down. I would not spend time on EAS reagents though.

    Good Luck!!
     
    #4 ElectricNoogie, Jul 30, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2015
  6. BerkReviewTeach

    BerkReviewTeach Company Rep & Bad Singer
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    Just a historical note here. Benzene chemistry was a fair topic in the MCAT back in 2003, but the test underwent a content change and it was nixed from their list after that. Reactions such as EAS and NAS were removed. Had they still been testing that material, you would have likely heard some complaints about it. Given that nothing has been mentioned here in eleven years, it's probably safe to assume they do not test those reactions that they formally removed.

    However, the big four MCAT companies (EK, TBR, Kaplan, and TPR) address aromaticity, so those staffs must have seen something to warrant covering it. But that does not mean EAS reactions are fair game. Those were removed many years ago, and I don't believe any of the big four (all of whom were around back when that change was made) have EAS in their books (and haven't for years).

    It would seem counterproductive to spend energy on either EAS or NAS reactions.
     

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