Jun 19, 2015
4
0
Saw a few threads that said going to a community college then transferring is a bad idea because CC looks really bad for Dental schools. They advised not to take any science classes there or as few as possible and even then you're taking a risk. Is this true? My plan was to take as many science classes as possible to get those easy grades before transferring and I'm starting to have second thoughts....
I'd appreciate any experience, thoughts, and tips you'd like to share on this matter.
 
OP
murt1998
Jun 19, 2015
4
0
If this exact question has already been answered before please just send a link
 

Toothbrush Brother

2+ Year Member
Feb 1, 2015
57
58
Status
Pre-Dental
Taking a few credits isn't too bad but taking all your hard classes at CC is a big red flag. Dental schools want to see you can handle the rigors of Dental School so they much prefer University credits.
 

NavyDDS1990

5+ Year Member
Feb 14, 2014
1,041
919
Status
Dental Student
dental schools indeed look down on CC credits.
A few of them actually don't take pre-reqs if they're from community college.
 

still in school

5+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2013
17
11
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm not sure what you mean by as many as possible but I'd personally reserve the upper level science courses for a university.
 
OP
murt1998
Jun 19, 2015
4
0
I see. Which classes are you guys referring you when you say upper level and advanced?
Sorry to barrage you with so many questions but in the two year period at a CC which pre reqs or classes would you recommend I take to benefit the most while tarnishing my credibility as little as possible?
 
Apr 1, 2015
139
125
Status
Pre-Dental
hey OP, we are on same boat. I had no other choice but CC after high school. I took all the pre-reqs required by a state school that I wanted to transfer to except Physics, Biochem and Genetics. I also took A&P, Microbiology at CC but retook upper div micro after transferred. I ended up having roughly 70 CC semester units and 55 units at university by the time I applied. I guess the most important thing is to do well at 4-year and keep your Gpa as close as that from CC (assuming your CC gpa is high).
 

Toothbrush Brother

2+ Year Member
Feb 1, 2015
57
58
Status
Pre-Dental
Upper level and advanced would be stuff like Microbio, Biochem, Anatomy, Physiology, and etc. Honestly I would recommend only taking non-science classes at CC and all your science classes at a University.
 

customx

7+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2009
1,245
478
Status
Dental Student
Don't let everyone here deter you. I took a year of bio, chem, ochem, physics, 2 quarters of A&P and a quarter of micro all at a CC. The only two prereqs I took at a 4 year school was biochem. I was able to get interviews at Michigan, UW, UNLV and a few other schools. Yes, there are some schools that don't accept CC credits, so don't apply there. As long as you have solid grades with a competitive DAT, you should be fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: caloc and xkc9126x
Nov 22, 2014
1,574
805
Status
Non-Student
Dental schools don't want to see "easy". Dental school is hard and they want to see that you can keep up. Yes, you will hear a few people that did all of their "hard" classes at a CC but keep in mind, you are already applying in a competitive pool and taking all of your science classes at a CC is going to be more of a hindrance. Also keep in mind that dental schools change their requirements and in 4 years, those CC credits might not be accepted anywhere, who knows.

If you are going to a CC to save money, really price out your 4 year costs. You may find that going the CC route costs you more, especially if your credits don't transfer. Also keep in mind, there is a limit as to how many credits all dental schools will accept from a CC so you might be over that limit with your plan too.
 

447113

Guest
Jan 24, 2012
609
114
Saw a few threads that said going to a community college then transferring is a bad idea because CC looks really bad for Dental schools. They advised not to take any science classes there or as few as possible and even then you're taking a risk. Is this true? My plan was to take as many science classes as possible to get those easy grades before transferring and I'm starting to have second thoughts....
I'd appreciate any experience, thoughts, and tips you'd like to share on this matter.
Of course if you go to a CC and get good grades, then transfer to a 4 year university and get poor grades, and your DAT reflects that, it will hurt you. But if you transfer to a 4 year university and do well taking upper level science courses, and your DAT reflects that, then it won't matter.
 

bilbany12

2+ Year Member
May 9, 2015
128
49
Status
Dental Student
Well, here's my 2 cents:
I did all my chemistry, biology, physics, microbiology prereqs at a CC. I got my associates at a CC. I've now started my junior year at a university.
Two weeks ago I finished my DAT with a 22AA and a 29OC. Therefore, I know my education is credible; but as everyone else has said, that's not how dental schools see it.
Comparing CC to University, I definitely had it easier at CC. You have better relations (more personal) with teachers, you have more time to study (there's less b.s., like no lab quizzes), and you can make CC work around your schedule. I loved CC!
Granted, I do wish I went to a university from the start to be more competitive. But if you go to a CC, you can still be competitive. You'll just have to show outstanding accomplishments ontop of CC credits.
 
  • Like
Reactions: xkc9126x
Sep 17, 2015
58
10
Status
Pre-Dental
What if:
• you went to a 4-year, did horribly
• Spr'12 - transferred out to CC and did really well (3.9), didnt complete degree tho
• then Fall'15 - transferred back into 4-year for junior year (currently taking bio and major courses so idk my gpa yet)

But i've working at a dental office for the last 2 years - applied for the receptionist position, then quickly adapted and learned to do credentialing, billing, basic assisting when we are short of hands with too many walk-ins), and became assistant office manager while doing the above duties - I plan on staying in the practice until dental school comes around (crosses fingers)

-- does this raise a red flag...or help my application a little bit?
 
Last edited:

Kittenz

Class of 19'
5+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2014
282
200
Status
Dental Student
Merely attending a CC is not going to break you. I did 2 years of CC and took around half of my pre-reqs there and was given interviews to 18/18 schools I applied to. I only needed to avoid applying to Tufts and BU.

However OP, your mentality of assuming you'll do well just because the classes are in a CC is arrogant. Not only is it arrogant, but it will be a devastating blow to your ego if you don't perform well in those classes.

My advice for anyone with their head on their shoulders that is planning/currently/or has taken CC courses is to have consistent (positive) grades between the CC and the 4 year university you'll transfer to. In the event that it's been an uphill battle, keep moving forward and aim for an upward trend. They're different environments and that alone can cause someone to slip.
 
  • Like
Reactions: xkc9126x
Nov 22, 2014
1,574
805
Status
Non-Student
What if:
• you went to a 4-year, did horribly
• Spr'12 - transferred out to CC and did really well (3.9), didnt complete degree tho
• then Fall'15 - transferred back into 4-year for junior year (currently taking bio and major courses so idk my gpa yet)

But i've working at a dental office for the last 2 years - applied for the receptionist position, then quickly adapted and learned to do credentialing, billing, basic assisting when we are short of hands with too many walk-ins), and became assistant office manager while doing the above duties - I plan on staying in the practice until dental school comes around (crosses fingers)

-- does this raise a red flag...or help my application a little bit?
An upward trend in grades is generally a good thing. What is your current overall GPA? Your first 4 year school experience will count toward that so now that you are back at a 4 year school, you need to nail your grades, A's preferably and get your oGPA as high as possible.
 
Sep 17, 2015
58
10
Status
Pre-Dental
An upward trend in grades is generally a good thing. What is your current overall GPA? Your first 4 year school experience will count toward that so now that you are back at a 4 year school, you need to nail your grades, A's preferably and get your oGPA as high as possible.
How and where can we find out our overall GPA? Is there a formula to calculate it? I just transferred this semester, so my GPA reseted back to 0.00 on my degree audit..
 
Nov 22, 2014
1,574
805
Status
Non-Student
How and where can we find out our overall GPA? Is there a formula to calculate it? I just transferred this semester, so my GPA reseted back to 0.00 on my degree audit..
You can get a general idea but taking your grades from all of the post-secondary schools attended, including any college level classes taken in high school. There is a link at the top of the forum for dental school admissions info from Doc Toothache and in that shows how to calculate your exact GPA. If you had a 3.0 at the rest of your schools, that would be your overall GPA until you get grades in now.
 

cacajuate

5+ Year Member
Aug 27, 2012
1,398
1,435
Status
How and where can we find out our overall GPA? Is there a formula to calculate it? I just transferred this semester, so my GPA reseted back to 0.00 on my degree audit..
Your previous class will still count regardless that your new uni starts you at a 0.0.