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Is Helping in a Physio lab a form of leadership?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by premed21, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. premed21

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    I was wondering if helping out in a physiology lab section for a semester is a form a leadership or does that count as volunteer or something? An option that the biology dept. offers is that we can take units to assist the students in the lab class if we took that course and did well.

    By assisting, I mean to say we are not actually teaching the lab class (a master student teaches the class). We simply help out the students in the lab. Is this a form of leadership? Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. funkymunkytoes

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    If you are leading, then it is a form of leadership. From my estimation, you seem to be leading.
     
  4. WhizoMD

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    don't think it'd be considered leadership really, since you wouldn't actually be teaching the class.
     
  5. paramedtech

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    I think it is a form of leadership as you will be helping students in the lab and I assume you will help them with techniques and assignments therefore it should be considered a leadership EC
     
  6. Dr Lyss

    Dr Lyss Professional Student
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    if you want it to be leadership you can describe it like that in your ECs. I would probably put it closer to tutoring or advising.
     
  7. Lukkie

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    not sure if you went to UCLA but we have a similar program called "UA" (undergraduate assistant) where a grad student handles the lab whereas an undergrad helps out with whatevers needed, like helping students.
     
  8. premed21

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    Isn't tutoring a form of leadership as well? What is tutoring classified as if it is not a form of leadership, is it "community service?" Because I am not actually helping out in the community, I am helping out in the school for the students. Or is it a non-clinical volunteer experience? Can you please tell me the difference between how "tutoring" is classified versus how "leadership" is classified? Seems like tutoring can be a leadership.
     
  9. Dr Lyss

    Dr Lyss Professional Student
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    well honestly it is how you view it and interpret the meanings. As I understand it, a leader is someone in a position of responsibility that is often distinguished (such as president of a club, or a selected member of a council, or being chosen as a speaker for an event). From the way you described it as "helping out" a teacher in a lab section I would put that under academic community service. The community being your college classmates and the service being your extra help... but again this is how I would do it. If you want to stretch it you can.
     
  10. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    There are several categories of "experiences" and they are not mutually exclusive: e.g.
    Leadership,
    Teaching/Tutoring
    Paid Employment, Military
    Paid Employment, non-Military
    Community, non-clinical
    Community service, clinical

    There are some other, that I don't recall at the moment.

    Teaching can be paid work or it can be volunteer.
    A person in the military could have a leadership role (and an officer is almost by definition a leadership role)

    The point is, you have to find the category that best fits what you want to convey about the experience. Frankly, I don't find teaching/tutoring to be a leadership activity. To me, leadership would be having a supervisory role other other tutors or teachers. Leaders also chair meetings, make decisions on behalf of the members of an organization and communicate those decisions to the members and to the public, etc.
     
  11. premed21

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    Thanks for the advice. So even though I meet with the lab TA and the professor every week to discuss the schedule of what we are doing in the lab, and preparing for the students in order to help them learn, it is not a leadership?

    I understand that it all depends on how I convey the experience, so I guess my new question is, has anyone helped out in a lab and described it as a leadership role, or is this possible to do?
     
  12. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    Do you run those meetings? Are you leading that group (professor, lab TA & you)?

    It seems that this better fits as "teaching/tutoring" or "employment, non-military".
     

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