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is it hard to find a residency?

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by Lisochka, Apr 13, 2007.

  1. Lisochka

    Lisochka Senior Member

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    Is it hard to find a residency and then fellowship?
    Is there statistics somewhere on that issue?
    Thank you guys in advance :)
     
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  3. dynx

    dynx Yankee Imperialist

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    They are very easy to find. They hardly ever move and there are lists of them published. Last year, 100% of people were able to locate at least 10 residency programs.
     
  4. Tired

    Tired Fading away

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    Yes, there is statistics somewhere on this issue.

    You're welcome.
     
  5. aProgDirector

    aProgDirector Pastafarians Unite!
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    People aren't being very helpful, because your question is almost too vague to answer.

    The answer is, "it depends". Id depends on whether you go to med school in the US, and what specialty you want.

    Essentially all US medical grads can get a residency, unless you screw up big time in medical school.

    Some fields have many more spots than applicants (like family medicine). Some have many more applicants than spots and are very competitive (opthal, derm, radiology, surgery, etc). What's hot and what's not can change.
     
  6. skypilot

    skypilot 2K Member

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  7. radonc

    radonc Senior Member

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    finding a residency is the easy part...getting in is a whole different story.
     
  8. mig26x

    mig26x Senior Member

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    you can start by going to FREIDA. Its a very good web page that gives you info on residency programs by state and specialty.
     
  9. Lisochka

    Lisochka Senior Member

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    Thank you so much for your reply
    by "freida" you mean this:
    http://freida.org/

    may be it is .net or .com?
     
  10. Lisochka

    Lisochka Senior Member

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    guys, thank you so much for your answers.
    I apologize that I was vague in my question....
    And yes, I did mean "to get in" instead of "find" (In my language, when we say "to find" it means "to get in". Sorry :) )
     
  11. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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  12. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    As others have noted, "getting in", finding or matching into a residency and/or fellowship has so many variables:

    - the competitiveness of the field
    - the competitiveness of your application (which would include things like your USMLE scores, in-training exam scores, letters of rec, evals, etc.)
    - the competitiveness of a particular program

    Every year in September, JAMA produces a Medical Education issue which gives a lot of data tables about residencies. You might find it interesting to look at last year's edition as well as the AMA links above for students.

    In another post you mentioned a few things that I wanted to comment on:

    - you mention wanting to heal, but not really wanting to work with patients
    There are fields, most notably Pathology and Radiology, where you work
    closer with other physicians than patients. A career in Translational
    Research may also be an option

    - you don't want to have to worry about malpractice, paperwork, etc.
    In the old days we could recommend an academic practice for someone
    who didn't want to deal with the business end of medicine. While it is
    generally the case that if employed by a hospital you don't have to
    worry about the malpractice (paid for you by the hospital) and the
    business end, you cannot be ignorant of the financial part of medical
    care. You must be knowledgeable about billing, what certain tests costs
    (especially if your patient is paying out of pocket) and you have to
    do paperwork...in any field.
     
  13. docB

    docB Chronically painful
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    All excellent points. I would add a slight clarification that while as an academic you might not have to worry about paying for malpractice insurance you will have to worry about getting sued for malpractice.
     
  14. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Thank you for adding that; of course, you cannot escape malpractice unless of course, you don't practice (and even then, if you ever did you need some tail coverage).
     
  15. Lisochka

    Lisochka Senior Member

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    thank you so much!:)
    Kimberly, big thanks to you!:)
     

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