Is it OKAY to like 2 PROFESSIONSS???

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bootylicious

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So, I have been juggling between D.D.S. and M.D. I have been shadowing doctors in both professions and seem to not dislike anything. I am a third year, so I don't really have time anymore to think it over. I have also been part of a free clinic program where we go to Mexico and I just love the idea of helping underserved community. There are, however, some slight differences I have seen in both professions ( you may not agree, but your ideas are welcomed). First, I noticed that most patients who come in at a dental clinic have the happy-go-lucky attitude and seem to be happy visiting the clinic for check-ups or whatever reason it may be; while, on the other hand, patients that do go to general clinics do not bring the same attitude (well, at least for most patients and it is obviously acceptable to have that type of attitude in general clinics who seek medical help.) So, at the end of the day, I think I would prefer being in an environment where everyone seem to be excited and vibrant. And, it may seem that I am leaning more towards D.D.S. but these subtle differences do not fully explain which field I like most. I am utterly confused. PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!

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So, I have been juggling between D.D.S. and M.D. I have been shadowing doctors in both professions and seem to not dislike anything. I am a third year, so I don't really have time anymore to think it over. I have also been part of a free clinic program where we go to Mexico and I just love the idea of helping underserved community. There are, however, some slight differences I have seen in both professions ( you may not agree, but your ideas are welcomed). First, I noticed that most patients who come in at a dental clinic have the happy-go-lucky attitude and seem to be happy visiting the clinic for check-ups or whatever reason it may be; while, on the other hand, patients that do go to general clinics do not bring the same attitude (well, at least for most patients and it is obviously acceptable to have that type of attitude in general clinics who seek medical help.) So, at the end of the day, I think I would prefer being in an environment where everyone seem to be excited and vibrant. And, it may seem that I am leaning more towards D.D.S. but these subtle differences do not fully explain which field I like most. I am utterly confused. PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!

i only read the first sentence. but it seems that the future in medicine (at least some parts of it) will overlap with dentistry, particularly the facial region. i was talking a dentist last year and he said that in some patients (facial reconstruction) collaboration with doctors is needed. He also predicted that a combined MD/DDS degree is part of the future.
 
Is it OKAY to like 2 PROFESSIONSS???


NO, it is not OKAY to like 2 PROFESSIONS. What are you thinking!??! :eek:
 
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Disinence... so, is your friend going for M.D.????
 
First of all, I'd argue that most people are NOT happy-go-lucky about going to the dentist. I don't know if your guy pumps his waiting room with laughing gas or something, but for most of us, going to the dentist is hell.

Returning to your question, though--Medicine is a much more diverse field. MDs can have tons of different kinds of practices in tons of different fields. In med school, you'll get exposure to many different specialties, practice settings, and patient populations. You'll have a chance to find your niche and pursue it.

Dentistry, on the other hand, is an extraordinarily narrow field. If you decide to go to dental school over medical school, you better be 100% married to the idea of being a dentist for the rest of your life.

IMO, I don't think you've gotten enough exposure to medicine (it's very hard to.). You might want to see if you can work with a broader mix of MDs (e.g., a pediatrician).
 
Thank you, Boris. Well, at least in my situation, the dentist I'm shadowing seem to have a very out-going personality and seem to have that "laughing gas" as you may call it. So, it seems that it is possible to create a happy and healthy environment. YES, I believe that most people might not be cheerful going to the clinic, but a dentist or anyone can change that - personality types can often influence the environment (for instance, if your a sad and boring dentist then patients might even try to avoid you). Anyways, these are just my opinions. Also, I've been wanting to get more exposure but it is hard to find doctors who are willing to have a mentee following them around.
 
I believe you have to go DDS/DMD first then you earn your MD during OMFS residency.

Actually, I don't think you do, I think the MD is optional as I had my wisdom teeth cut out by a DDS who was an OMFS and I asked him this same question. He said that the MD for him was only one more year I think and he said for his goals it just wasn't necessary. But, I'm no expert.
 
Actually, I don't think you do, I think the MD is optional as I had my wisdom teeth cut out by a DDS who was an OMFS and I asked him this same question. He said that the MD for him was only one more year I think and he said for his goals it just wasn't necessary. But, I'm no expert.

Using the traditional path for OMFS, you definitely need the DDS/DMD first. Then you can enter either a 4 year or 6 year OMFS residency. The 6 year ones include years 3 and 4 med school and will give you the MD.
 
First of all, I'd argue that most people are NOT happy-go-lucky about going to the dentist. I don't know if your guy pumps his waiting room with laughing gas or something, but for most of us, going to the dentist is hell.

Returning to your question, though--Medicine is a much more diverse field. MDs can have tons of different kinds of practices in tons of different fields. In med school, you'll get exposure to many different specialties, practice settings, and patient populations. You'll have a chance to find your niche and pursue it.

Dentistry, on the other hand, is an extraordinarily narrow field. If you decide to go to dental school over medical school, you better be 100% married to the idea of being a dentist for the rest of your life.

IMO, I don't think you've gotten enough exposure to medicine (it's very hard to.). You might want to see if you can work with a broader mix of MDs (e.g., a pediatrician).

than get a tooth drilled. Dentists freak me out. Docs are fine and so are needles but no drills. Creepy.
 
Thank you, Boris. Well, at least in my situation, the dentist I'm shadowing seem to have a very out-going personality and seem to have that "laughing gas" as you may call it. So, it seems that it is possible to create a happy and healthy environment. YES, I believe that most people might not be cheerful going to the clinic, but a dentist or anyone can change that - personality types can often influence the environment (for instance, if your a sad and boring dentist then patients might even try to avoid you). Anyways, these are just my opinions. Also, I've been wanting to get more exposure but it is hard to find doctors who are willing to have a mentee following them around.

I don't know...usually my dentists are pretty friendly, but I hold a small grudge against them in the back of my mind as they approach me with sharp metal objects that supposedly go in my mouth. You can be cheerful all you want, but do people really get excited when they hear they need to pull out their teeth?

Maybe I'm just not thinking too highly of dentists right now because I have to get my wisdom teeth pulled out soon. I know it's normal and almost everyone does it at some point or another, but when I first heard about needing my teeth pulled, I decided that the dentist was lying and just wanted to unleash some sadistic streak on an unfortunate innocent patient that only wanted her teeth cleaned. :(
 
Focus specifically on what physicians and dentists do every day. Although a surgeon and a dentist may have similar tasks, other physicians' tasks are unlike that of dentists. My dentist says "Hi" to me and then spends the rest of the time working on my teeth. I consider dentistry to be a less interactive profession than medicine (except for surgeons, of course). Maybe you need to choose a few medical specialties that you like, and then compare those to dentistry.
 
Actually, I don't think you do, I think the MD is optional as I had my wisdom teeth cut out by a DDS who was an OMFS and I asked him this same question. He said that the MD for him was only one more year I think and he said for his goals it just wasn't necessary. But, I'm no expert.
True....it's not required, but I don't see any point in not doing it.
 
It seems that you don't want to be a DDS/MD (most of whom, I suppose, treat head & neck cancer and other ENT type problems) but that you are interested in primary care dentistry or primary care medicine.

You may want to consider whether you have the manual dexterity and spaitial relations skills to be competitive for dental school. Have you compared the MCAT and DAT to determine if one or the other is a more realistic goal?
 
Case western has a unique program that offers a MD/DDS degree...
here is the link... I'm applying to it b/c I'm in the same boat as you are....

http://dental.case.edu/

Blessings
 
My understanding behind Case's joint degree is that they want to create rural docs who can also do dentistry. Like a "one stop shop" kind of deal, where the same person can serve as many needs as possible in a small community. Sound kind of cool, but also kind of unfocused.
 
Well, DAT seems more realistic because it doesn't have a Physics section as opposed to MCAT having the real-deal in terms of testing your science background (Chemistry, PHYSICS, and Biology). I enjoyed O-Chem because it was very visual and I truly liked that concept, so that may be advantageous in DAT (and possibly MCAT for the OChem portion). But, I haven't really started studying so I cannot really judge on how bad/well I'll do in those tests.
 
my parents are dentists, and i wasnt sure about this same thing!!

well there is a DMD/MD program in case western i think (5 year program tho) and u get ur DMD degree and MD degree

how sweet is that??
 
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