Is it possible to get admission in MD after passing FPGEE and NAPLEX?

NPF.Pharmacist

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Hi,
I am a foreign pharmacy graduate, who have passed NAPLEX. Now, I am looking for a job. I am a bit confused. Should I go for specialty or MD? My own interest is to be an MD. However, I don't have enough money. So I am going to wait for 2 or 3 years to raise funds. What should I do? I want to provide the close patient care. My financial condition wasn't good. So I had to get to a pharmacy school. Now there is no one to feed or support. I am a free person. My aims are clear. However, I need to know about the path.

Let's say, I start my medical school at the age of 27. When would I be able to pay my debt if I am lucky to get an admission?
What are my options other than MD? Board certifications?
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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No, I never meant like this. I just wanted to know about my options.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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those tests won't mean anything to medical admissions......gpa and mcat are what matter
Okay, I understand. Open linkedin and you are going to see zillions of people with Pharm.D. and M.D.
My questions is I am a an international student. So what is my pathway for the MED school. I have to get a good score in MCAT. What else?
 

Mad Jack

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You have to have at least 60 credits at a U.S. university for most schools to seriously consider you, as well as all of the MCAT/med school prerequisite courses taken at a U.S. school. Generally you also have to be a U.S. citizen or have a green card.
 

BidingMyTime

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Let's say, I start my medical school at the age of 27. When would I be able to pay my debt if I am lucky to get an admission?
What are my options other than MD? Board certifications?
Do you currently have any debt? Depending on what school you go to, whether you get scholarships, etc., medical school can easily add $200,000-$300,000 debt. How quickly you pay that off will depend on how frugally you are willing to live.
Your path to medical school admission will be the same as anyone seeking to go to medical school. The MCAT is necessary, you will need to have all the prerequisites (whether or not they would count if taken in a foreign school will probably depend on the school you are applying to, as well as the foreign school that you took them at.) The fact that you foreign credits were transferrable for you to be eligible for the NAPLEX, I would take as a good sign that you they may count for your medical school prerequisites. Medical schools also like good letters of references, experience job shadowing a doctor or otherwise working with a doctor, anything that shows you have a good character. Your best bet is probably to talk to some medical schools admissions directly, to find out what they would want, from a candidate in your situation.
Many pharmacists have switched careers to become doctors, it is certainly possible if that is what you want to do.
Board certifications in pharmacy are always an option, they generally aren't going to get you more pay, but may be helpful in getting a job that gives you more job satisfaction.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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Do you currently have any debt? Depending on what school you go to, whether you get scholarships, etc., medical school can easily add $200,000-$300,000 debt. How quickly you pay that off will depend on how frugally you are willing to live.
Your path to medical school admission will be the same as anyone seeking to go to medical school. The MCAT is necessary, you will need to have all the prerequisites (whether or not they would count if taken in a foreign school will probably depend on the school you are applying to, as well as the foreign school that you took them at.) The fact that you foreign credits were transferrable for you to be eligible for the NAPLEX, I would take as a good sign that you they may count for your medical school prerequisites. Medical schools also like good letters of references, experience job shadowing a doctor or otherwise working with a doctor, anything that shows you have a good character. Your best bet is probably to talk to some medical schools admissions directly, to find out what they would want, from a candidate in your situation.
Many pharmacists have switched careers to become doctors, it is certainly possible if that is what you want to do.
Board certifications in pharmacy are always an option, they generally aren't going to get you more pay, but may be helpful in getting a job that gives you more job satisfaction.

I have no debt. I plan to raise at least 150-200K before joining the med school. I would raise this money from my pharmacy jobs. It might take 3 years. My life style isn’t luxurious. I have the health insurance as well. Right now, I am of 24 years. That is why I am planning to step in at the age of 27. I would have enough money as well as a chance of green card. On the other hand, I can carry on my pharmacy job (as a part time).
I have a 12 year education prior to Pharm.D. in my country that is equal to high school in the USA. In SSC, I had mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry and English. In HSC, I had biology, physics, chemistry and English.
I love medicine. However, because of financial issues at that time, I had to select pharmacy school. I raised the all money for pharmacy school. There was no aid for me. I did myself. My determination to the cause would help me to build a good letter.
Right now, I am on the work visa.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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You have to have at least 60 credits at a U.S. university for most schools to seriously consider you, as well as all of the MCAT/med school prerequisite courses taken at a U.S. school. Generally you also have to be a U.S. citizen or have a green card.
I have a 12 year education prior to Pharm.D. in my country that is equal to high school in the USA. In SSC, I had mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry and English. In HSC, I had biology, physics, chemistry and English.
 

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I have a 12 year education prior to Pharm.D. in my country that is equal to high school in the USA. In SSC, I had mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry and English. In HSC, I had biology, physics, chemistry and English.
SSC? HC? It isn't clear to me whether you have taken US coursework or not.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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SSC? HC? It isn't clear to me whether you have taken US coursework or not.
No it is a foreign education system( India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc.) . It is equal to High School of USA( HSC certificate of our system).I was reading a few articles. For a foreign student, universities or colleges ask for transcripts and MCAT. I have a Pharm.D and I am going to build a strong background in clinical medicine before I jump into school. So having a Pharm.D. would help me or not?
 
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Mad Jack

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You need to have the prerequisite courses taken in the United States or your app will go right in the trash. @Goro @LizzyM or @gyngyn could elaborate on it better than I could, but basically we don't know how the rigor of your home country's courses compare to US coursework so you need to take some courses here to prove you have what it takes. Your courses were also in the equivalent of high school- only college level coursework is accepted as prereqs regardless.
 

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Concur. Basically, whatever you did in the old country doesn't count. You're going to have to start fresh.


You need to have the prerequisite courses taken in the United States or your app will go right in the trash. @Goro @LizzyM or @gyngyn could elaborate on it better than I could, but basically we don't know how the rigor of your home country's courses compare to US coursework so you need to take some courses here to prove you have what it takes. Your courses were also in the equivalent of high school- only college level coursework is accepted as prereqs regardless.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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Concur. Basically, whatever you did in the old country doesn't count. You're going to have to start fresh.
Okay. I got it. How should I take this start? I also need to have a job so that I can save money for MD. Any suggestions.
 

Goro

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Enroll in a local university. Community colleges will have cheaper tuition, but not all med schools accept pre-reqs from CCs. Given that you're a non-traditional student, they may cut you some slack though.


Look at books like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Med-School-Rx-Getting-Doctoring/dp/1607148358

Shill alert: Dr Hartwig is an old chum of mine.

Work on getting your green card too, if you don't have it already.
Okay. I got it. How should I take this start? I also need to have a job so that I can save money for MD. Any suggestions.
 
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one thing to add, if you are an international students, you will have almost zero chance to get in any medical schools in US (I said almost zero, not zero!)
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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one thing to add, if you are an international students, you will have almost zero chance to get in any medical schools in US (I said almost zero, not zero!)
Oh, why is that?
Even if I have spent 3 years at the United States as clinical or community pharmacist.
 
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Oh, why is that?
Even if I have spent 3 years at the United States as clinical or community pharmacist.
had experience myself and many of my fellows for pharmacy schools, and have seen statistics of medical school matriculants. But once again, it's not a zero chance.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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had experience myself and many of my fellows for pharmacy schools, and have seen statistics of medical school matriculants. But once again, it's not a zero chance.
So you are a pharmacy student? Foreign pharmacy student too?
 

LizzyM

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Many medical schools limit admission to US citizens who are residents of their state (meaning that they've lived in that state for a minimum number of years, paid taxes, etc). Some schools will accept students from other states and some will admit international students but there is a strong preference toward applicants who have a green card.

Medical school admission requirements usually include a minimum of 90 credits taken in the US or Canada. This is about 1350 hours of classroom instruction. This must include biology, chemistry, organic chemistry and physics with laboratory instruction. New requirements are popping up that include English, behavioral science (psychology/sociology), biochemistry and statistics.

The MCAT is required. This exam covers the material in the required coursework as well as reading comprehension and critical thinking.

Overall, about 43% of applicants to medical school are admitted in a given year. It is not easy to be admitted to med school even if you meet all of the admission requirements because there are far more applicants than seats. I suspect the proportion of international applicants who gain admission is even lower than 43% but I don't know for sure.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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Many medical schools limit admission to US citizens who are residents of their state (meaning that they've lived in that state for a minimum number of years, paid taxes, etc). Some schools will accept students from other states and some will admit international students but there is a strong preference toward applicants who have a green card.

Medical school admission requirements usually include a minimum of 90 credits taken in the US or Canada. This is about 1350 hours of classroom instruction. This must include biology, chemistry, organic chemistry and physics with laboratory instruction. New requirements are popping up that include English, behavioral science (psychology/sociology), biochemistry and statistics.

The MCAT is required. This exam covers the material in the required coursework as well as reading comprehension and critical thinking.

Overall, about 43% of applicants to medical school are admitted in a given year. It is not easy to be admitted to med school even if you meet all of the admission requirements because there are far more applicants than seats. I suspect the proportion of international applicants who gain admission is even lower than 43% but I don't know for sure.
You are right. But you see there are so many pharmacists with MD degree. How do they do then? Did they opt for college education of 4 years after the pharmacy? There are people who have majors in math, business, accounting, etc., and now they are in MD school or doing residency? That is little shocking to me.
 
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LizzyM

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You are right. But you see there are so many pharmacists with MD degree. How do they do then? Did they opt for college education of 4 years after the pharmacy? There are people who have majors in math, business, accounting, etc., and now they are in MD school or doing residency? That is little shocking to me.
There may be pharmacists who obtained their pharmacy degree in the US and did the prerequisites for medical school concurrent (as part of their pharmacy training) or after completing the pharmacy degree. The key is education in the US. The other possibility is pharmacy degree and medical school abroad and then come to the US to complete a residency, pass the required exams and be licensed in the US.

When you have a pharmacy degree from abroad it isn't possible to get the MD unless you have several years of coursework done in the US. IN some cases, I've seen applicants from abroad who did a PhD in the states rather than 3 years of undergrad classes.

MD schools in the US welcome a wide variety of people with undergraduate degrees in many different subject areas including math, philosophy, economics, anthropology, etc.
 
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This is the most confusing thread I've ever read. Seems like OP is confused as are people responding to him/her because its unclear what the question is. Look, there aren't a ton of M.D., PharmDs. Do you know how much school and training your talking about here? If your not legal resident your going to have a hell of a time getting in...plain and simple sorry. If you still want to give it a shot make sure you have the prereqs done, which will probably require you go back to college to obtain those. GL
 
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whatbout2morrow

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OP is from a region where high school graduates directly enter professional programs such as medicine, pharmacy, etc.

Pharmacy education in the US, for the most part, involves at least 2 years of undergraduate level education before entering a 4 year PharmD program (many complete bachelor's degrees before entering pharmacy school here).

Depending on the individual school, 60-90 credit hours of US undergraduate coursework is usually needed to apply to medical school in the US. Most applicants will complete a bachelor's degree before entering medical school. The bachelor's degree does not have to be in a biology or health related discipline.

Many medical schools specify that you must complete 60-90 credit hours and all of the medical school pre-requisite classes (physics, chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, calculus, statistics, english, biochemistry, etc) in a US institution order to have an accurate way to compare your academic performance with other applicants.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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OP is from a region where high school graduates directly enter professional programs such as medicine, pharmacy, etc.

Pharmacy education in the US, for the most part, involves at least 2 years of undergraduate level education before entering a 4 year PharmD program (many complete bachelor's degrees before entering pharmacy school here).

Depending on the individual school, 60-90 credit hours of US undergraduate coursework is usually needed to apply to medical school in the US. Most applicants will complete a bachelor's degree before entering medical school. The bachelor's degree does not have to be in a biology or health related discipline.

Many medical schools specify that you must complete 60-90 credit hours and all of the medical school pre-requisite classes (physics, chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, calculus, statistics, english, biochemistry, etc) in a US institution order to have an accurate way to compare your academic performance with other applicants.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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This is the most confusing thread I've ever read. Seems like OP is confused as are people responding to him/her because its unclear what the question is. Look, there aren't a ton of M.D., PharmDs. Do you know how much school and training your talking about here? If your not legal resident your going to have a hell of a time getting in...plain and simple sorry. If you still want to give it a shot make sure you have the prereqs done, which will probably require you go back to college to obtain those. GL
I am a legal resident. I am also paying tax. So prereqs are needed. I have to go to college first. How is it possible? I can do job with college. I don't think my boss would allow me.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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There may be pharmacists who obtained their pharmacy degree in the US and did the prerequisites for medical school concurrent (as part of their pharmacy training) or after completing the pharmacy degree. The key is education in the US. The other possibility is pharmacy degree and medical school abroad and then come to the US to complete a residency, pass the required exams and be licensed in the US.

When you have a pharmacy degree from abroad it isn't possible to get the MD unless you have several years of coursework done in the US. IN some cases, I've seen applicants from abroad who did a PhD in the states rather than 3 years of undergrad classes.

MD schools in the US welcome a wide variety of people with undergraduate degrees in many different subject areas including math, philosophy, economics, anthropology, etc.
Okay, I have to carry on my education too or go to college.
 
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Sorry, I lost you here. Would you explain?
I used to be an international students who were pursuing pharmacy career starting from 2008. Got my US citizenship throughout US military and now I'm on medicine route.
 

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I am a legal resident. I am also paying tax. So prereqs are needed. I have to go to college first. How is it possible? I can do job with college. I don't think my boss would allow me.
Preference is for those with citizenship or green card. You mentioned that you are on a work visa. Hence you will probably be lumped in the same category as international students. And very few international students get into medical school here.

Go to a college and speak to an advisor. The system is much different here from that in southeast Asia. They might be able to find something that works with your schedule.
 

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Preference is for those with citizenship or green card. You mentioned that you are on a work visa. Hence you will probably be lumped in the same category as international students. And very few international students get into medical school here.

Go to a college and speak to an advisor. The system is much different here from that in southeast Asia. They might be able to find something that works with your schedule.
This. Legal resident doesn't mean ****. I know a girl with a Pharm.D from a US school, undergrad from a US school (both extremely well known schools, very good) and a 4.0, multiple leadership opportunities, etc. She didn't get in anywhere because she was not a permanent resident or citizen. Not one place.
 
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I used to be an international students who were pursuing pharmacy career starting from 2008. Got my US citizenship throughout US military and now I'm on medicine route.
You worked for the US army and then perused for med school? Did you get your prereqs ?
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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This. Legal resident doesn't mean ****. I know a girl with a Pharm.D from a US school, undergrad from a US school (both extremely well known schools, very good) and a 4.0, multiple leadership opportunities, etc. She didn't get in anywhere because she was not a permanent resident or citizen. Not one place.
Okay, first get the green card then think about a med school.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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Preference is for those with citizenship or green card. You mentioned that you are on a work visa. Hence you will probably be lumped in the same category as international students. And very few international students get into medical school here.

Go to a college and speak to an advisor. The system is much different here from that in southeast Asia. They might be able to find something that works with your schedule.
Okay, I am in Chicago. I need to get to a college first for the prereqs. Job with prereqs is gonna b tough
 
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You worked for the US army and then perused for med school? Did you get your prereqs ?
Yeah, I did most of them while in CA and finished while in the army.
 
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NPF.Pharmacist

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Great
Yeah, I did most of them while in CA and finished while in the army.
Great. How did you manage your job with studies? Would you guide me for this process? How about Career Changer programs? Should I avail them?
 
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Great

Great. How did you manage your job with studies? Would you guide me for this process? How about Career Changer programs? Should I avail them?
You go to school part time. You don't have to go full time.. Med school usually cut you some slack if you are a non trad student.
 

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the OP needs to learn the US system first as he/she seems to be clueless about what to do for US med school admission. The best way is to go directly to the sources for the answers to his/her questions, in this case by calling or scheduling an appointment to speak to an admission adviser at the medical schools he/she is interested in. Asking around on a web forum is more like a waste of time imho...

on a side note, it is very hard to get into a US med school as an international student but it is not very hard to get in as an illegal immigrant... go figure :)
 
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why dont you try the international MD school like the Duke NUS Singapore program?
This seems good. But do I need to go to college for this program or I can apply on the basis of my Pharm.D.?
Would I be able to do my residency in the USA after I get the degree?
 
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the OP needs to learn the US system first as he/she seems to be clueless about what to do for US med school admission. The best way is to go directly to the sources for the answers to his/her questions, in this case by calling or scheduling an appointment to speak to an admission adviser at the medical schools he/she is interested in. Asking around on a web forum is more like a waste of time imho...

on a side note, it is very hard to get into a US med school as an international student but it is not very hard to get in as an illegal immigrant... go figure :)
Lol, no way. I would follow the law. Yes you are right but I am just asking this for planning purposes. I am willing to go to college. I am willing to go to any state for my passion.
 

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Lol, no way. I would follow the law. Yes you are right but I am just asking this for planning purposes. I am willing to go to college. I am willing to go to any state for my passion.
For what you want to do, you def have a lot of work to do. I estimate it will take you 5 years minimum.
 
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You go to school part time. You don't have to go full time.. Med school usually cut you some slack if you are a non trad student.
And how much time do I need to pass this stage ?
2 year or 4 year program?
 

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And how much time do I need to pass this stage ?
2 year or 4 year program?
If you already have a PharmD in your homeland, you might need about 60 credits to be considered for US med school. That will take you about 3 years taking classes part time at night at a Community College.
 
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If you already have a PharmD in your homeland, you might need about 60 credits to be considered for US med school. That will take you about 3 years taking classes part time at night at a Community College.
Okay, what are the general criteria for such admission?
I am an international student for them too. Do I have to pass SAT?
 

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Okay, what are the general criteria for such admission?
I am an international student for them too. Do I have to pass SAT?
ok, you got me... if you continue asking questions like these, yes you have to take the SAT and/or repeat kindergarten... lol :)

now I seriously want to think that you are troll... b/c I do not think any pharmacist from any country would ask such questions for real... let alone a pharmacist who has just passed the NAPLEX... are you even a real pharmacist ??
 
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ok, you got me... if you continue asking questions like these, yes you have to take the SAT and/or repeat kindergarten... lol :)

now I seriously want to think that you are troll... b/c I do not think any pharmacist from any country would ask such questions for real... let alone a pharmacist who has just passed the NAPLEX... are you even a real pharmacist ??
Lol :) I would go for the board certifications then. It is better.