MHA Is it possible to get in grad school ( health care admin ) with low GPA 2.14 ( MD)

OP
dufferdexter
Oct 13, 2014
5
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
A GPA that low is going to make things pretty damn difficult, dude, tbh.

I'm assuming that since you provided your hs GPA and not an undergrad GPA that the med school didn't require it or something.

Okay, so, a 2.14 is well below most programs' GPA floors (typically 3.0, but they often reach below for high GRE or very experienced candidates). It is probably too low for many schools to even consider (think UMN, UM, UNC, JHU, etc...). With that said, you seem to have good experience, and the MD aspect will be a positive too. You can try your luck at some schools and hope someone falls in love with your app and invites you to interview, at which point you'll control your own destiny. However, you'll need to absolutely kill everything else in your app (amazing SOP, great LOR, great GRE (if you need to take it)) and get the app in ASAP. Even with that, expect a very "random" process and know that there's a real chance you'll strike out.

Per a thread on Gradcafe and my experience with admissions, I'd also recommend taking several years off to work (2 at least, probably more like 4-5). The more distance you put between yourself and that GPA, the less impact it tends to have (admissions folks understand that a 30yo MD probably shouldnt be judged by a GPA from 6 years ago).
Thanks mate. Still I am thinking of applying to mid tier universities like St Mary's uni of Minnesota or 3rd tier like ULV (minimum recommended GPA is 2.5 there in both of them ) and if possible later transfer. Or may be some national universities like VIU OR calUMS ( required GPA 2.0-2.5 ) Yeah low GPA is making is pretty hard . I did pass the licensure exam in my country .
 
Jan 25, 2014
180
71
Atlanta, GA
You should consider taking some graduate level courses at a local college. That way you can show admission committees that you're able to excel in graduate level coursework, and that your undergraduate grades are not reflective of your academic potential. I would say that you should work for a few years and take some courses that are related to public health, particularly one's that allow you to display your ability to understand and master both quantitative and qualitative skills.

I hope this helps!
 
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Jan 27, 2014
155
62
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I agree with taking some graduate level classes to prove you can do well. Also, I would recommend killing the GRE (like get close to a perfect). Also provide a supplemental essay explaining your low GPA. If you do all of this, you may have a shot at some of the good programs. If not, then I would recommend working for a year or two. they do tend to value work experience over grades.
 
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OP
dufferdexter
Oct 13, 2014
5
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
Thanks guys.. yeah I been considering taking GRE ( in biology) this coming April . but before that I wanna give it a shot with SOP, LOR , work experience .. about gaining more work experience . I got 4 years of teaching English at high school (part time ), 1 year as foreign consultant in administration department of an institute, 3 months volunteer work in Sichuan ( earthquake effected remote areas), 1 week volunteer work in Beijing ( floods in 2012, that's when the accident happened) , 1 year of clerkship ( excellent feedback from doctors on LOR) , intern at medical laboratory ( not sure it can be counted as my dad is a pathologist and I just went with him to lab and helped him out there).
I wonder if I need to gain more work experience and if yes (any recommendation other than practicing at a hospital as physician ) ?
 
OP
dufferdexter
Oct 13, 2014
5
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
I agree with taking some graduate level classes to prove you can do well. Also, I would recommend killing the GRE (like get close to a perfect). Also provide a supplemental essay explaining your low GPA. If you do all of this, you may have a shot at some of the good programs. If not, then I would recommend working for a year or two. they do tend to value work experience over grades.
I am confused about providing a supplement essay . i mean should I give a little bit explanation in my SOP or its better to provide supplement essay ?
 
OP
dufferdexter
Oct 13, 2014
5
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
you'll get different advice but I've always recommended you do a supplemental essay if it doesnt fit naturally in your SOP.

Also, only do it if there is a legit reason for the gpa.
Thanks mate..
Btw I just mentioned the reason in two sentences in my SOP and put emphasis on what did I do about it .. didn't want to appear like I am trying to give excuses or whining about it ..lol .
 
Jan 25, 2014
180
71
Atlanta, GA
Hi @dufferdexter ,

Just to clarify, if you're able to properly provide evidence that there's misrepresentation in your academic records that are offset by test scores or other academic-related indicators of success, then It should not come off of as an "excuse". As long as you're not blatantly trying to gain pity from the admission counselors, and you're able to show growth and how your challenges set you back but did not hold you back. That's why I would recommend taking a few graduate level courses or killing your GRE/GMATs/other standardized admission tests, to show them that you're able to handle graduate level coursework and be successful in their program.

I know someone who had a bit higher GPA (mid 2.0s) than you though it still was considered lower than average for their graduate program. They were able to get near perfect scores on the GRE, had solid experience in the field (not even work experience, just like internships and class projects/capstones), and had a compelling SOP. Despite their GPA, they were still able to gain admission to a few programs, including two Ivy league programs.