Is it really worth the amount of schooling to become an optometrist?

Discussion in 'Pre-Optometry' started by Hart1086, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. SDN is made possible through member donations, sponsorships, and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. Hart1086

    Hart1086 5+ Year Member

    20
    1
    Dec 25, 2010
    I'm a junior in college and a Pre optometry major. I've read a lot on this forum about how the job opportunity for optometrists is declining and the difficulty in getting a full time job. Is it worth the amount of schooling to attain the title as on optometrist?


    Someone give me some advice !!! i need help.....
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. physicslover

    physicslover 5+ Year Member

    333
    0
    Dec 20, 2009
    I graduated recently and am in the work force now, in an entry level office job..which is sadly what I could obtain with my B.Sc. and it really reaffirmed my ambitions to become an optometrist! SO YES IT IS WORTH IT, to me anyways! Working in an office, being micromanaged by EVERY LEVEL, having people tell you how to write the date to every little thing you do, really frustrates and is not enjoyable.

    Sorry, I'm just kinda venting, but if you it's really that much of an effort for you to go through another 4 years of schools, you should probably write a pro/cons list. To me, it is definetely worth it.
     
  4. JMaui

    JMaui

    52
    0
    Dec 13, 2009
    West Coast
    As with any other profession, there are people that succeed and people that struggle through finding a job. I'm not sure how much research you have done or talked to any ODs that are in practice.. but I have seen many new grads find jobs okay. After a couple of years, they will find "better" jobs (as in non-commercial) and go from there.

    I guess what I would advice is to look within yourself. Do you really want to be an optometrist and why? Have you given any other health professions any thought? Why not?

    One thing you will have to do before you start applications is shadow optometrists. I think that it was a great learning experience. I also shadowed other health professions and decided from what I saw that optometry was right for me.

    So is going to optometry school worth it?

    It's worth it to me, but only you can decide for yourself if it will be worth it for you.

    Also, what is the problem that you have with optometry school? Is it the 4 years or the tuition?
     
  5. Hart1086

    Hart1086 5+ Year Member

    20
    1
    Dec 25, 2010
    Thanks for replying!

    Jmaui- Time and money isn't really as big of an issue as the value of the title of being an optometrist.

    I just wanted to know for the amount of time and effort I will be putting into becoming an optometrist that it will be worth it when I get out of school. I'm mainly talking about job opportunities/salary.

    I've seen people on this forum and some articles saying that there are too many optometrists and they're having trouble finding work.

    It just has me concerned and second guessing the career I've wanted to pursue my whole life..... Thats how the question '" is it worth it?" came about.
     
  6. thecgrblue

    thecgrblue Enjoyin' the journey 2+ Year Member

    795
    11
    Jul 6, 2009
    You need to find the answer for it yourself. Online forums are hardly an accurate survey of the overall professional satisfaction. My father-in-law was an accountant, made $300k+/year and hated his job, but did it b/c it helped provide for his family and allowed him an early retirement. My Dad has been an engineer for 30 years and disliked his job for the last 10. So, find something you like and go from there.

    As far as the oversupply...could be, just requires you to use some brain power, elbow grease, and a whole lot of networking to make your way. Try searching 'dentist oversupply' and you'll be surprised to find a few pages where dentists (god forbid) feel their areas are saturated. I've been to poor dentists and I've been to rich dentists, its all about how they work their practice.

    I'd say this, get all the education that is available to you. These days a bachelors degree in most fields means about as much as kindergarten graduation
     
  7. Hart1086

    Hart1086 5+ Year Member

    20
    1
    Dec 25, 2010
    thecgrblue- Thanks for replying.

    are you an optometrist?

    if so. what was your starting salary right out of school?
     
  8. thecgrblue

    thecgrblue Enjoyin' the journey 2+ Year Member

    795
    11
    Jul 6, 2009
    Nope, going to school in August. (FYI, not the greatest of tact to ask people what their salaries are)

    I was told at during an interview day that its not uncommon for a new grad to generally earn somewhere between $70k-100k.
     
  9. thiaeyemd

    thiaeyemd New Member 10+ Year Member

    173
    6
    Jun 16, 2005
    I think if you are going to do something like optometry you have to look hard at the upsides and downsides.

    pluses
    easy life
    ok salary 75 to 150k
    easier school

    negatives
    not a lot of respect from the medical community
    having to sell stuff (ie glasses)

    I think optometry is trying to make itself more legit but it has a long ways to go. In the future it may be better. Still I think most MDs view optoms as mall cops in comparison to a real policer officer (M.D). My wife is an OD so I know. I am an MD. There is a lot of retail in being an OD. If you want to be a true "doctor" I would do the real deal.
     
  10. Bioflare

    Bioflare I'm on a boat!

    116
    0
    Dec 14, 2010
    I think that view is kind of shallow, it might be just that analogy is quite bad at representing the differences between specialists. Since an optometrist is a specialist in eye health (diagnosis and treatment) other than ophthalmologists. And in no way do I think becoming an MD is an easy task. But from your words its seems like you fit in that group of most MD's.

    The negatives seem just to stem from the culture, most of those aren't true.
    Medical respect only pertains to your own ego, if you believe you are doing good for people this shouldn't matter at all. Many optometrists don't sell glasses, that's what you have opticians for =), its a very good partnership.

    I would agree with the pluses though, I know Med School is tough and the hours that a doctor is required to work is extremely high. This can tax relationships and social life depending on what you choose to do. Optometrists can dictate how much they work and from that how much they make. If you're working for let's say commercial companies like Walmart, you'll generally earn less than if you had your own practice. But there is no limit to how much you could earn (think managing an operating multiple practices) at the end of the day its up to you.

    If you care about your earnings then there are many other professions that can earn you a higher average income. But it always comes back to how much drive you have. Either drive to earn money or help people (I'm hoping its the latter =P) will guarantee a decent living with as an optometrist.

    GL :D
     
  11. Retinopathy

    Retinopathy

    36
    0
    Jan 1, 2011
    Please don't tell me you tell your patients, colleagues, children, relatives, friends, and acquaintances that your wife, an OD, is not a true "doctor"...

    Your analogy doesn't sit well with me. Mall cop instead of police officer? :thumbdown:
     
  12. hoops123

    hoops123

    142
    0
    Jan 6, 2011

    that is a very narrow minded approach, maybe you should spend a few days with your wife at work, if she is an OD.
     
  13. thecgrblue

    thecgrblue Enjoyin' the journey 2+ Year Member

    795
    11
    Jul 6, 2009
    I know this may be difficult to comprehend, but not everyone in the world wants to be an MD. I can make up ridiculous generalizations too!!!

    I think most MDs are pompous weiners that spend most of their day looking around for the next person to belittle so that they can reassure themselves that those thousands upon thousands of hours of school gain the respect that they feel they should have. MDs don't respect DOs, MDs don't respect caribbean MDs, MDs don't respect dentists, MDs don't respect your mom, MDs don't respect ODs....etc etc etc.

    I'd rather be a mall cop than douche-bag. Hopefully for the sake of your marriage you don't come home and say "Hey honey, how was your day of being a fake doctor?"
     
  14. lsmc888

    lsmc888 2+ Year Member

    132
    0
    Jul 2, 2010
    honestly, why did you even post this
    it was very disrespectful and obviously a biased opinion considering that you are an MD. and if you are an ophthalmologist, then good for you but if we did the "real deal" it would not even be guaranteed that we would get to be the kind of doctor that we want, whereas, if we already know we want to be an optometrist, we don't need to go through med school to do it.
     
  15. Moptometry

    Moptometry

    67
    0
    May 9, 2010
    I had the same question as well, and my dad told me: Learn as much as you can while your are young and have the opportunity cuz NOBODY can take your knowledge away from you.It is always yours.So it doesnt matter how much you spend or how many years you study for, education is always worth it. Becoming an optometrist is not easy nor is it cheap, but then how many people can provide the service you can provide? Not many. and Ps. if it was not worth it people would not spend 150K just for a title. :D

    p.p.s. The above posts are actually hilarious. M.Ds are not God, and they are not better than anybody. Lets see if a MD can refract better than an OD. :smuggrin:
     
  16. Meibomian SxN

    Meibomian SxN 7+ Year Member

    705
    2
    Feb 2, 2008
    Guess what general surgeons think about ophthalmologists....
     
  17. thecgrblue

    thecgrblue Enjoyin' the journey 2+ Year Member

    795
    11
    Jul 6, 2009

    thiaeyemed
    : Now look here, my good man!
    Everyone Else: We don't want to talk to you no more, you empty headed animal food trough whopper! We fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of eldeberries.
    thiaeyemed: Is there someone else up there I could talk to?
    Everyone Else: No, now go away or we shall taunt you a second time-a!
     
  18. emtwannabe

    emtwannabe

    12
    0
    Feb 3, 2012

    Well said!!!
     
  19. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member


    There is nothing in thaieyemd's post that isn't true. If it makes you feel bad that ODs get no respect in the medical community, then you should reconsider professions. Why is that today's youth have been conditioned to disregard anything that doesn't "agree" with their viewpoint? The only thing I'd change in his post is to say that "not a lot of respect" is a kind way of saying "zero respect" in the medical community. Optometrists are regarded as 3rd class citizens by most ophthalmologists and other MDs and in many cases, it's totally justified. I know some ODs who absolutely should not be practicing, but they keep on going because they can't afford to retire.

    If you don't want to go to med school, for whatever reason, don't come into optometry and expect it to be an easier, less stressful version of the same thing. Any stress you save at the front end will be returned to you when you realize the profession you dedicated yourself to has no future and is in the process of dying away.
     
  20. blaba

    blaba 2+ Year Member

    47
    0
    Jun 2, 2009
    The amount of schooling should be no concern imo. It's the money lebowsky. Costs keep going up past well over 200k+ and interests now accrue while you are in school.
     
  21. optoapp2012

    optoapp2012 2+ Year Member

    312
    9
    Oct 10, 2011
    Berkeley, CA
    That's a total fabrication that optometry is a dying profession. It's changing, for sure. But optometrists will continue co-managing laser correction patients and pre/post op cataract patients; performing vision therapy for children; teaching low vision patients how to manage with decreased vision; refracting the vast majority of patients; treating conjunctivitis; etc.

    I agree that there is a lot of animosity between ODs and DOs...but just because there are some terrible optometrists out there doesn't mean every one of them has lost the medical community's respect. I think it depends a whole lot on the MD's and a whole lot on the OD's. I work for some optometrists right now that absolutely love their jobs and have excellent relationships with several ophthalmologists' offices where we frequently refer patients back and forth. No use in perpetuating the terrible relationships by badmouthing one another. Both professions serve very necessary functions and the lines between opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists will constantly be blurred and shifting...deal with it.

    As for optometry and is it worth it...the only way you can answer that is to shadow a variety of doctors. You have to witness firsthand the ups and the downs. I had my doubts when I shadowed one OD who couldn't stop complaining about the insurance system. Yes, it sucks for all medical professionals. But the ODs that I work for now just have a different attitude toward everything, even though they deal with the same insurance frustrations. They love their practice and enjoy being optometrists. They each worked in commercial practices for a couple years right out of school and then opened up a brand new practice together. They've been in business for 13 years now and the practice is growing in profit every year and getting busier every year. And they practice in a nice area near downtown of a major metropolitan city. I think the saturation problems mostly affect practices in large cities - so going to a smaller, but growing community usually stands the best chance of becoming a profitable practice. Optometry schools will teach you how to evaluate a community for success. I think what makes my employers so successful is that they choose to carry very exclusive eyewear lines so that we are one of only a couple or the only place in the city to have a brand (Chanel, Prada, Bevel, Emilio Pucci, Robert Marc, Lunor, David Yurman, etc.). That allows them to remain competitive even in a big city. So knowing how to evaluate where you want to open a practice is important. There will always be job opportunities upon graduation so long as you are open about where you go for that job.

    All the best!
     
  22. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    [​IMG]
     
  23. Shnurek

    Shnurek Banned 2+ Year Member

    2,335
    8
    Apr 10, 2010
    NYC
    Yes, it is worth the years if you don't take out 200k in 6.8% debt and work in a saturated big city so that you will end up paying it back for the next 10, 20, 30 years. I feel I may have to turn into KHE on these forums except with my own added twist.

    How to be successful with an OD: Go rural and get on medical panels.
     
  24. percyeye

    percyeye 5+ Year Member

    19
    3
    Aug 2, 2011
    The way I figured out whether I really wanted to pursue Optometry was to work in a field not like Optometry. I soon learned I loved everything about Optometry and health care. It must depend where you live and the state of economics there because I've heard nothing but great things from Optometrists where I'm from.

    As for the Ophthalmologists and Optometrists through my own experiences working in clinics where both were present I've seen nothing but respect and professionalism toward eachother. They liked having the Optoms to refer the patients to them, after surgery they'd refer the patients right back to them.

    And it is true not everyone wants to be an M.D., I just don't want the life of those long of hours and high stress days.
     
  25. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    Shnurek, this is the problem - many of you guys have the delusional belief that after shadowing an OD or two, reading some threads on SDN, and spending a couple of semesters in an OD program, that you've got it ll figured out. You're not an OD. You have no idea how much you don't know. When I was a first year, I could have written some of the posts you've made. I had absolutely no idea what I was talking about because I had no way of knowing. You will one day, but right now you don't.

    If you think you can avoid the pitfalls that are developing by moving out to the sticks, you're going to be disappointed when you realize that they followed you. Moving into a rural setting might (emphasize might) help you avoid some of the saturation issues that plague ODs in denser populated areas, but it can't avoid all of the down-stream problems that oversupply has created and continues to feed. Those problems will exist and continue to worsen whether you're in rural Wyoming or the middle of NYC. I won't even get into the difficulties of someone from an urban area moving to a rural community. You're most likely not going to be welcomed in with open arms. People will likely view you with some suspicion, even if it is not outright unfriendliness. If you think you'll move into some small town in the middle of nowhere, setup a practice, and have patients flocking into your door, you're in for a surprise.

    You can keep telling yourselves that everything is great - I'll go rural, I'll start my practice at the top of a redwood tree in Muir Woods, I'll do this or that....but at the end of the day, you're entering optometry. It's the same optometry that all of us practice in and unfortunately, optometry is what optometry is - no amount of imagination can change that.

    There's nothing wrong with moving to a rural setting and trying to get listed on as many medical panels as possible, but it's not going to save you from what optometry is fast becoming.

    You guys all think that because you "see" successful, happy, established ODs out there in practice, that you can therefore achieve the same result after graduating. You don't understand that many of those same doctors will quietly admit that they could not get to where they are now if they graduated in the last few years. The world was a much different place when older ODs graduated. There's nothing more sad than hearing a pre-op or OD student say "Well, I saw my home town OD's office and how great it was and I thought, I could totally do this..." You guys just don't see the truth for what it is. No one is blaming you - there's no way you could know. Everyone and their cousin has lied to you from the get go. Those of you who choose an OD will see eventually, but it will be too late.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  26. Satstill

    Satstill

    21
    0
    Feb 4, 2012
    Maybe we can work for hospitals, VAs, military, universities or even pharmaceutical companies. I personally dislike working in private practice and commercials. However, private practice is potentially much more rewarding.
     
  27. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    Indeed, a few of you can. The problem is, there will be over 2000 new ODs being added into the system every year with only about 400 retiring. Let me say that again. There will be over 2000 NEW ODs entering the system every year, with only a few hundred retiring.

    Undoubtedly, a few of you will be able to burrow your way into a hospital setting somewhere, maybe a VA or even (gasp)...one of the coveted, mythical Kaiser FT positions that we sometimes hear of. The other 1980 in each class will end up at Walmart or a comparably awful analog, decimating private practice in the process and growing the commercial side of the profession. Then one day, in the not-too-distant future, private practice optometry will be virtually extinct, just like pharmacy, and most of you will be working at CVS or Walgreens.

    Sorry, but that's the way it is....
     
  28. 319671

    319671 2+ Year Member

    551
    0
    Mar 21, 2010
    i agree with the first half of this.
     
  29. love4eyes

    love4eyes

    77
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    Hello Jason K. Can I ask where (sources) are you getting this figures (bold words above) from? I would like to learn more about the issue. Thanks.
     
  30. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    There are no methods to tabulate exactly how many graduates enter practice each year and there is no way to tell exactly how many ODs retire, but there are estimates. Up until a few years ago, we had 17 schools of optometry pumping out about 1300 graduates each year. Over the past decade or so, there have been increases in both school class sizes and the number of schools themselves. We now have new OD programs started or scheduled to start in:

    California
    Arizona
    Massachusetts
    Virginia
    Texas
    Nevada (slated for development)

    That brings us to 23 schools of optometry, and that's not counting any more programs that will sprout up in the near future. In my estimation (and the estimation of many other ODs who are looking at the situation), we're looking at 2000, or at least very close to that number in the near future. The number of grads entering practice will soon exceed 2000 per year and many of those grads will have nowhere to go but commercial, garbage optometry. That feeds commercial optometry, which then feeds the AOA, which then lies to potential students so they can lure more people into their member base, which then feeds more commercial optometry.....and the cycle continues.

    As far as the retirement data, it varies depending on the source. The numbers range from 350 to 550 depending where you look. There are many ODs in practice who would like to retire, but can't since they don't have enough money to do so. The result is, they work far longer than they might otherwise.

    However, let's be positive and shave 500 from the grad estimate and cut the retirement number in half. You still end up with a net plus of 1250 ODs per year. There is simply no way that even a majority of those grads can find decent work. Some will. Most won't, and those that don't will further contribute to the sinking of the profession by expanding commercial optometry as it takes over private practice, forcing it out of existence....just like pharmacy.

    What all of this boils down to is that there's just no place for the thousands of new grads that will be entering the profession in the next few years. There is nowhere for them to go unless they feed into commercial optometry. Private practice optometry is NOT expanding. It's shrinking. There can only be one result from that trend, which is sure to continue. The profession is being irreversibly converted over to a commercial model, which is what all of you are buying into. You just don't know it yet.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  31. love4eyes

    love4eyes

    77
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    Good morning/afternoon,

    Alright Jason K, thanks for your input above. However, if it's really becoming a problem (the shrinking of private practice), what are current optometrist (like yourself) or current students doing about the said issue to aid the future of optometrist?

    You seem to have a passion with words, why not use it to the benefit of the profession rather than over exposing Pre-Opt students about ALL the pessimistic/negative view of going into optometry?
     
  32. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    Most of the profession is doing absolutely nothing. You guys see those successful, established ODs out there and think you can do what they have done. In their own minds, many of them are thanking their lucky stars they came out of school when they did since they know, full well, that you guys don't even have a chance at what they have. Why are they not out trying to save the profession for you? Why should they? Do they owe you something? They're busy trying to make ends meet for themselves. I'm not justifying the fact that optometry has stood by while the rug was pulled out from under us, but that's the reality of why there's been no action. People just figure someone else will take care of it. When that happens, nothing happens.

    There are some ODs who are trying to fix things. Unfortunately, the forces that they're up against are blocking them at every turn. The AOA is acting like a childish high school freshman, insisting on board certification despite the fact that about 98% of practicing ODs think it's a total mistake. Does that matter to the AOA? Nope, it will make them a ton of money so it's "full steam ahead." The American Optometric Society was formed in an effort to help the future of the profession, but it's too little too late. They won their lawsuit against the ABO (and the AOA indirectly), but that win is a drop in the bucket. The problem is too far gone. So, why is board certification import? Well, that's the problem - it isn't important at all with regard to the integrity of the profession, although the AOA would have you believe otherwise. When our central arm of action (The AOA) should be out fighting the good fight for us on our behalf, they're instead in a peeing contest, essentially with practicing ODs, about their need to pay thousands of dollars to take an exam that proves they know what they've already proved they know. Instead of dealing with the real issues that face the profession and its future, they're toying around with nonsense because they want the cash-flow from exam fees.....and boy do they need it.

    At the core of the problem is the simple fact that we have done ourselves in by not regulating our numbers intelligently. We've created a system like pharmacy in which we have way to many practitioners and the excess simply went into the part of the profession that would eventually drown it out of its initial form. Look at pharmacy now and you'll see what optometry is likely to become in a decade or so - almost entirely commercialized and more and more automated.

    Some of us are actually trying to cut the problem off at the knees by informing would be suckers into the scam. If students were aware of the realities that they only become aware of after several years in practice, the problem might never have taken off. I can't tell you how many ODs I've heard utter the phrase "Man...if I knew then what I know now....."

    Most students these days are hoping to pursue a career in private practice. That's precisely why I'm here. I got sick and tired of interviewing students who said "I plan on opening my own office when I get out of school....or I really want to open a group practice with several of my friends...." Students are not able to do those things as they once were, they just don't realize it. If everyone was on here saying "I really want to work at Sam's Club," then I wouldn't be on here warning you about the future. The reality is, students want to go into private practice and unfortunately, it's not going to be around in significant numbers for much longer. I'd give it 10 years before we look just like the PharmDs.

    You've got at least one student on here talking about how "All you have to do is go rural..." Sorry, friends, that might help a few of you out partially, but there will be thousands upon thousands of you coming out of school in the next few years.....and you'll all need to find a place to land. There won't be enough room for you. That's the reality. So, where will you go? You'll go into the nearest Walmart/Sam's/Costco/America's Best/Pearle Vision etc, etc and you'll take as many hourly IC positions as you can get. A few of you might find your way into a low-paying, but respectable PP position, but the rest will all follow the inevitable path of commercial crap.


    If you'd stop and think for a second, you'd see that what I'm doing is about the only thing an individual OD can do - warn students about what they're about to get conned into. It's high and mighty to say "Why not just go out there and make a difference?" Well, that's like telling a Palestinian-American to go make peace in the middle east. It's just not going to happen. Take the warnings from the "negative" ODs on here and do with them whatever you please, but as I and others have said before.....don't say someone didn't warn you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  33. q1we3

    q1we3 5+ Year Member

    467
    2
    May 10, 2011
    For the next 4 years, there will around 1650 graduates from the 20 schools. The newer schools won't be putting out any graduates till then but yes eventually there will be 2000 graduates per year. You did not factor in international students, mainly Canadians. Schools like Pacific, NECO, PCO, ICO etc. have many Canadians who won't be practicing in US. Plus, the population will keep rising and aging so it can accommodate few more graduates but not many.

    So, I would say the surplus of ODs would be around 800 for the next few years, which is still way too much. Now if you think there are around thousand PP jobs out there every year looking to hire you, then you are completely ...... However, there are jobs from Lenscrafters, Costco, Walmart etc. where most graduates will be working. As matter of fact, ICO have started to realize that and are offering optional clinical rotation at Lencrafters. Now tell me why would they do that? They are preparing you for commercial because that is the future for 70-80% of the graduates. Soon, UC Berkeley will be offering rotations at America's Best.

    Everyone entering this field should know these FACTS so they can make a sound decision. Optometry is next in line to go 100% commercial just like pharmacy, we are not there yet but will be in few years. Anybody with half a brain can see that. If you don't see yourself working in commercial setting then I would suggest you reconsider.
     
  34. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    Most Canadian students who come to the US to study do not return to Canada to practice. There a several reasons for that trend, but out of the 6 Canadians in my graduating class, a grand total of .....zero...went back to Canada. I know other programs have similar trends, although some students do make it back.

    The surplus is far greater than 800, unfortunately. Yes, the US population will increase steadily, but you're assuming that we're at level ground right now. We're not. Any amount of population increase could be EASILY absorbed into the current (and actually previous) OD supply without any trouble. Just look at the average OD output and you'll see that. It's about 1.1 patients/hour for the average private OD. We can see far more than that comfortably, but we just don't have the patients to do it since there are too many of us.

    This is BEYOND terrifying. Once the schools start sending students to America's Best....it's all over.

    Very smart advice. Unfortunately, there are many of your counterparts who do have brains....and still don't see it.
     
  35. Caerulus

    Caerulus

    14
    0
    Dec 30, 2011
    I am interested in moving to and working in the US after attending optometry school there (I'm from Canada). However, from what I have read, it seems that it is hard to stay in the states because the paper work/money involved in sponsoring a Canadian for working Visa is annoying for the employer.

    May I ask if you know how your classmates did it?
     
  36. Jason K

    Jason K 2+ Year Member

    I honestly don't have specific details on how they did it, but I know three of them married US citizens, which takes care of the problem. The other two that work are in faculty positions, and the 6th never practiced. She "retired" to another profession soon after graduation.
     
  37. Shnurek

    Shnurek Banned 2+ Year Member

    2,335
    8
    Apr 10, 2010
    NYC
    lol
     
  38. eyegirl89

    eyegirl89

    46
    0
    Nov 21, 2011
    If you agree with what Jason says, why is your status "pre-optometry" and why are you planning on going to optometry school?
     
  39. Shnurek

    Shnurek Banned 2+ Year Member

    2,335
    8
    Apr 10, 2010
    NYC
    That person has a 2.63 GPA and is going to IAUPR. Enough said, just ignore.
     
  40. love4eyes

    love4eyes

    77
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    Points taken.

    Yea, one of the doctor I had the opportunity to have shadowed told me (as I understood it as), "we (private practice) are a dying breed/practice." I took it lightly that day; however, I am now realizing what he meant by it after immersing myself with SDN and shadowing/talking with other PP ODs. It's just that I have never look at that perspective (the rising of the corporate / dying of the profession) in a country-like place such as where I am. For one, we have limited corporate establishment (ex: Walmart and Costco only); therefore, PP truly thrive in our place and they are highly respected. So far from what I've witnessed, all three PP I had shadowed are very healthy (traffic of pts, technological advances in their machines [one even have OPTOS, like whoa], the number of employees they have [like really, you need 5]). I guess OD PP here have a healthy competition and are very close/respected by each other.

    But thanks for giving your input in the board (and to other ODs as well). It truly gave me an idea about the current trends. However, I have personal foundations as to why I am pursuing this route. I can't wait to become an OD. :)
     
  41. blaba

    blaba 2+ Year Member

    47
    0
    Jun 2, 2009
    Ah, the smell of blissful ignorance. If your foundations are so personal, would you mind sharing them with admissions? Of course you wouldn't. The BS is overpowering.
     
  42. love4eyes

    love4eyes

    77
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    Are you referring to me, blaba? If you are....

    With the admission of the school, why not? Isn't one of the famous question: Why optometry? (why did it appeal to you?) Will I share that on this public forum, NO!
     
  43. blaba

    blaba 2+ Year Member

    47
    0
    Jun 2, 2009
    You are acknowledging the huge problem of debt, but dismissing it at the same time citing personal reasons? Well gee, on second thought, personal reasons is pretty much codename for "I like optometry." And that's it.
     
  44. q1we3

    q1we3 5+ Year Member

    467
    2
    May 10, 2011
    Are you putting down any collateral or co-signing for this individual's loan? Why is it bothering you so much if this person takes out a loan to go through optometry school? It is not going to affect you one bit, you won't be making any payments on his/her behalf.
     
  45. love4eyes

    love4eyes

    77
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    In following my post (only the selected quote from JasonK) from this thread, I was merely tackling the subject of "SATURATION" of ODs and "The transition to becoming corporate."

    Is this the gesture that made you think I was acknowledging the huge problem debt:
    But thanks for giving your input in the board (and to other ODs as well).

    FYI, I was just simply generalizing the idea of OD's taking there time to post on this site (esp, JasonK). Honestly, I wasn't paying attention to what some are talking about in here. A post from JasonK caught my attention and I want to find more about it.

    Yea, they were talking about those on the earlier part of the thread; however, try analyze where I came in and the type of questions I asked. :idea:
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  46. bnleong

    bnleong 7+ Year Member

    107
    0
    Dec 18, 2008

Share This Page