Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Is it worth it?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by RichieTemp, Feb 3, 2002.

  1. RichieTemp

    RichieTemp New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi everyone,
    I am a junior and am planning to go to med school. I already have taken the Mcat's (scored a 35) and have a reasonably high GPA. I've been speaking to a couple of my friends in med school and they've been telling me that you have to pretty much memorize entire books with all the details. Is this true for all med schools or does it vary from school to school?

    One of my friends has semi-photographic memory and is finding it alright. However, the other (who is a slower reader and memorizes by repetition) is really struggling.
    I too am a slow reader, so i would appreciate any advice from current medstudents in a similar position. Basically, I am trying to figure out if it is doable for someone like me, and if so is it worth it&gt;? <img border="0" alt="[Pity]" title="" src="graemlins/pity.gif" />
     
  2. Amy

    Amy
    Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,002
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    It is definitely doable. My memory isn't great, but I'm getting through med school just fine. As long as you keep up with everything, it's not a problem. If med school is something you really want, then go for it! You may have to study more than some of your classmates, but if you're dedicated to it, you'll be just fine.

    Good luck!! :)
     
  3. snowballz

    snowballz Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2001
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    1
    What the hell is a semi photographic memory and why does everyone claim to have one?

    Alicia
     
  4. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    From your MCAT score and grades, I'd say you're intelligent and can make decisions. What you will need to succeed in medical school is to develop and stick to a schedule of reading and studying. Will you have to do more than your friends with photographic memory? Yes. Does that mean it is not doable? No. You will just have to work harder than those guys/gals with photographic memory for the same result. Is this fair? No. But such is life. Good luck in med school. Work Hard! You will do fine.

    MS-IV
     
  5. Vader

    Vader Dark Lord of the Sith
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,066
    Likes Received:
    14
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    In medical school, you will be required to learn volumes of information. Succeeding is more about studying regularly and going over material again and again until you get it. Very few people have the ability to open a textbook at the last minute and assimilate all the information they need. The vast majority need repetition, which you get from lecture, assigned reading, small groups, PBL (if that's part of your curriculum), independent study, and watching "ER". Ok, maybe not the last one... :D The bottom line is that if you get admitted, you already have what it takes to succeed. Doing well is dependent upon how much effort you put into studying.

    BTW, you might consider P/F schools if you are worried about competing for grades. Believe me, it does take the pressure off. :D
     
  6. Fanconi

    Fanconi Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2001
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    1
    I agree with our radiologist-to-be up there. Go to med school if you want to be a doctor. That's all there is to it.

    Don't worry about how hard you have to work. EVERYBODY has to work hard. And, yeah, no matter how brilliant you are, med school is gonna SUCK at times. It's the nature of the beast.

    You will be tested, not only in class but also on a personal level. You will doubt many times that you made the right deicision by going to med school. I don't think I'm being a cynic here, either. Those feelings of frustration and doubt are pretty universal.

    But screw it. If you want to be a doctor, be a doctor. You can do it.
     
  7. Trek

    Trek Grand Uranium Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2001
    Messages:
    1,722
    Likes Received:
    1
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by snowballz:
    <strong>What the hell is a semi photographic memory and why does everyone claim to have one?

    Alicia</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Now that's beautifully eloquent. --Trek
     
  8. MacGyver

    MacGyver Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2001
    Messages:
    3,759
    Likes Received:
    5
    Not that this is really relevant to the topic, but several of you have mentioned photographic memory.

    My understanding of "photographic memory" (i.e. true eidetic memory) is probably a lot different than the term you are using.

    While there are many people with "good" memories, a true eidetic is so rare that some scientists would argue that it doesnt really exist.

    The reason its called photographic is because it implies exact reproduction of the target material.

    Its kinda like the following hypothetical:

    Suppose you are given an aerial picture of a forest (perhaps 50 feet above the treeline) containing maybe 100 trees.

    Now, suppose you are given around 2-5 minutes to look at the photograph with no materials available for copying or even writing down anything. After that time period, the photograph is taken away from you.

    Now get this: a true eidetic (photographic) memory would be able to reproduce an exact duplicate of the picture, INCLUDING EVERY SINGLE LEAF ON EVERY TREE VISIBLE IN THE PICTURE.

    I think that gives you a good idea of just how good a photographic memory really is and also makes clear that it is probably next to impossible that any of us has come into contact with such a person.
     
  9. watto

    watto Sleek White Pantsuit
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2000
    Messages:
    883
    Likes Received:
    59
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by MacGyver:
    [QB]My understanding of "photographic memory" (i.e. true eidetic memory) is probably a lot different than the term you are using. QB]</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">MacGyver, you always seem to be the board iconoclast. I think you could get a job as a fact checker for a decent newspaper. I say that knowing you will probably try to prove me wrong, even on that point!
     
  10. UCLA2000

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2001
    Messages:
    2,314
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    One of the psych classes that I took involved a few studies of people with photographic memories. They found one woman in particular who looked at a picture which was computer scanned. It was then somehow transferred into dots. Half of the dots were removed so that only half of an image was present. When superimposed however the entire image would appear.

    Anyways, the woman was showed half of the dots on one day, and then the next day she was shown the other half. They found that she was able to discern what the image was...
     

Share This Page